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Posted on October 16, 2012 12:36 pm
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edaPab
edaPab
Reps: 147
Too many questions?
There is a student in class who asks way to many questions. Most of the questions are either pointless or useless. The other students in class are getting annoyed with all of her questions and laugh at her even when she just rasises her hand cause they know what is coming. What can I do?
 
     
     
 
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Solution 1
Posted December 9, 2012 6:21 pm

Shankeil Tarver
Shankeil Tarver
Reps: 116
If there is a student who always asking questions then let the class know that today they only need to ask questions that deals with what they are discussing and if they have any additional questions they could meet with her when class is over.
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Zafer Unal
Zafer Unal
Reps: 957
This is great!!
  Posted on: December 20, 2012 1:43 pm

erugyn
erugyn
Reps: 100
Great solution!
  Posted on: October 18, 2014 8:04 pm

Jenna Herberson
Jenna Herberson
Reps: 200
You don't want to discourage them from speaking, so this is great.
  Posted on: February 25, 2018 6:05 am

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Solution 2
Posted November 4, 2012 3:56 pm

RyruNe
RyruNe
Reps: 86
Even in college I deal with colleagues who do the same thing, question after annoying question and most of the time her questions do not pertain to anything we are discussing in class at that time. As the teacher, if I noticed this was becoming a habit of one of my students, and other students were being distracted, annoyed, or affected negatively by her incessant questioning, I would schedule to have a small conference with the student either after class or at a time when other students were not around. During this time, I would address the problem and ask my student why they felt the need to ask so many questions. If I am able to get to the root of the reasoning for asking so many questions, I could then suggest ways for the student figure out certain things on their own without having to constantly interrupt the lessons. I could also help my student distinguish between dire, necessary questions versus questions that could wait until after class to be asked. Then, together, we could decide on an appropriate number of questions the student could ask within a given time frame. Allotting only a certain amount of questions to be asked might also help my student think before raising their hand and learn the significance of saving questions for moments when they really do not understand something.
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Solution 3
Posted December 2, 2012 5:01 pm

Melissa Tolbert
Melissa Tolbert
Reps: 104
I have encountered this problem in my classroom before as well. I do believe in promoting students to ask questions because this is an incredible way for the teacher to get a better idea of how the student understanding material and just what is going on in their lives, but I agree that it can keep other students from learning. When questioning becomes a distraction I like to make a point to tell the students that we are only asking questions about the given topic. If the students have any other questions they would like the teacher to answer that is not related to the current topic, they could write those questions down and put them in a question jar. With the jar, the teacher would answer the questions for the student later in the day or week. I would make a point to tell the students a specific time or day that the questions would be answered so they are not consistently asking when. This would allow your time to be used more efficiently and give them an outlet.
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Solution 4
Posted April 18, 2013 6:49 pm

N Gunnin
N Gunnin
Reps: 95
I would recommend that teacher talk with the student after class. Discuss that the questions asked are off task and disruptive. Provide examples to the student of the "off-task" questions and have him/her agree on a way to resolve the problem. If the problem persists, remind the student with a signal that his/her question if off task, and continue instruction. If this still does not work, suggests that the student write down the questions on an index card which I will review at the end of class and respond to accordingly.
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Solution 5
Posted April 18, 2013 7:35 pm

resabu
resabu
Reps: 101
I would ask the student before they ask the question, is this related to what we are doing now? If the student says yes then I would allow them to ask the question. I would also tell them they can ask me the other questions at a later time.
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Solution 6
Posted February 24, 2015 6:58 pm

Victoria Horn
Victoria Horn
Reps: 201
I would bring the class to an attention that their is no such thing as stupid questions so that they don't laugh at the person. I would ask the child if it is a serious question when she raises her hand. If nothing works, then I would tell the child one on one that this isn't appropriate.
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Solution 7
Posted October 8, 2017 11:44 pm

ysyByg
ysyByg
Reps: 200
Having the student write down their questions maybe a better solution. A lot of the time, the teacher will answer the question later on within the lesson. If they still have questions after, maybe leave a few minutes at the end of the lesson for question time
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Solution 8
Posted October 4, 2015 1:30 pm

aPazat
aPazat
Reps: 102
I would the students a limited number of questions to ask. He would get poker chips to indicate how many questions he can ask for the lesson. Every time he asks a question, the teacher takes a chip. It will teach the student to chose his questions carefully.
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