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Posted on September 26, 2012 1:14 pm
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Calina Irion
Calina Irion
Reps: 57
Know it all
Every class has one: a "know it all." Well, in class I had a student who thought she was the gift to the classroom and knew absolutely everything about everything. We were doing a pair share activity and she was completely insulting one of the students in her group who didn't really feel like participating. On one hand, the girl was being overly mean, but on the other hand the student wasn't doing what he was supposed to do. I was wondering if I should tell the student to calm down and not worry about the other student, or should I tell the unmotivated student to buck up and do the work? Either choice seems to have its draw backs and I can't really tell both of them to leave each other alone and do the work because then they will both be upset with me and not do the work.
 
     
     
 
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Solution 1
Posted November 4, 2012 10:17 pm

RyruNe
RyruNe
Reps: 86
I am finding that too many teachers and interns are assuming what will happen before they try anything. There is no telling that both students will be upset and then not do the work. However, they both need to understand their responsibilities as students in the class and act appropriately during lessons. As the teacher, it would be most effective to take each student aside, separately, and express to them what you expect from each of them. For the “know it all” it is best to just allow her to be who she is but explain to her that she is not the teacher and therefore it is not her responsibility to direct other students on what to do or how to work. She needs to understand that it is not polite to boss other students around or make them feel bad about how they work. Have a discussion with her about what you expect during group activities and how to treat other students. As for the other student, it is important that you speak to her about her participation during class activities and what you expect from all of your students regarding class work. If problems persist between the two then you should change the groups they are in to avoid future altercations.
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Solution 2
Posted October 2, 2012 3:25 pm

Ashlyn Eddinger
Ashlyn Eddinger
Reps: 121
You are right, either situation is going to have its down falls. I would personally talk to the group and make sure that each student is accountable for their own actions and work. In addition, I would also think about who I put in groups with this child. The "know it all" student needs to know that there is a right time and place to share their thoughts. For example, each day have the last 10 minutes of class be a time for students to share their thoughts and concerns of the day.
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Jenna Herberson
Jenna Herberson
Reps: 200
I agree, making every student accountable for their participation is going to be the best option.
  Posted on: February 24, 2018 6:29 am

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Solution 3
Posted October 2, 2012 3:27 pm

tebyXu
tebyXu
Reps: 114
I would address both problems. I would go over how we should treat our classmates to the mean student and I would go over the classroom rules about staying on task and putting forth effort to the other student.
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Solution 4
Posted October 2, 2012 3:01 pm

NeDema
NeDema
Reps: 113
I would be very careful who I would put this student with in group activities. It may not be a good idea to place her with an unmotivated student for it just gives that student an excuse for doing nothing. It might be better to have her with a student who is also outgoing and is not afraid to also contribute to the activity. You should also assign clear duties in each group so each student is responsible for a portion as to not allow her to take over.
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Solution 5
Posted October 2, 2012 3:11 pm

Courtney Morra
Courtney Morra
Reps: 118
If i were in this situation I would speak to both students separately. I would pull them both the side in private and tell them each what I told the other person so they do not feel singled out but so they understand what they are both doing wrong. I would tell the "know it all" that she is making the other student feel uncomfortable because she is being so harsh and she can worry about their job in the group and I will talk to the student about participating. I would them talk to the other student and explain to them that I told the other student that I asked the other student to do their job and that I would speak to them about participating more. I would explain to them that each person in the group has a job and they are responsible for that job and if they all do not do their jobs that it can affect their grades. I would also ask both students if they had any questions or concerns so that they will feel comfortable talking to me and coming to me again with any of their future problems.
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Solution 6
Posted October 2, 2012 3:42 pm

Justin Mortenson
Justin Mortenson
Reps: 108
Both students may need some amount of attention, and the one insulting the unmotivated one may need the attention immediately. I think it is certainly fine to ask her to calm down. You can ask her if she could try and help the student instead of putting them down. Either way, her behavior is undesirable and you need to communicate that to her as soon as you are aware of it. If you have class rules that address this behavior you may need to discipline the student who was insulting the other according to those rules.
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Solution 7
Posted October 9, 2012 11:08 am

amaJud
amaJud
Reps: 114
This is not something you can avoid, you need to talk to the student who thinks she is the "gift " of the classroom. I would talk to the student and ask her how she would feel if I treated her the way she was treating her classmates, and explain that maybe the other student was having a bad day. I would talk to her and let her know the next group she was going to get a job that didn't have as much work because I want her to notice how smart her classmates are. During the group work she is to write down one thing each group member did that was great, and one thing she thinks they could improve on. With this method the student will still be able to participate but she also will be able to work on being nicer to her classmates. I would also talk to the other student and ask why they are so off task? I would remind the student of the procedures in my classroom.
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Solution 8
Posted October 13, 2012 5:40 pm

vemybu
vemybu
Reps: 119
I would focus on each of the students. Start by telling the student who is slacking that if they want to receive points for the activity then they need to participate. Then turn to the other student and inform her that it is never okay to speak to someone that way and that if she wants to be a leader then she needs to be positive.
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Solution 9
Posted October 16, 2012 9:27 am

NaZyde
NaZyde
Reps: 115
The situation should be handled in a private setting. Both students should be talked to. I would also speak to both of the students parents, to see where this type of behavior is coming from.
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