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Posted on October 17, 2014 1:49 am
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 Purry
Purry
Reps: 108
EBD Behavior Issue
A male student in the 2nd grade is in a full inclusion classroom with a general and special education teacher. This student is very disruptive and has already been labeled EBD. He continue to disrupt the classroom by flipping over desk, chairs, throwing things, and being so disruptive the entire class has to stop. The teachers have had administration come into the classroom over ten times. Their response is always to try to calm the student down and provide positive discipline. His behavior may change for the moment but is never consistent. He should be placed in the EBD classroom but they do not want to move him in the middle of the school year.
 
     
     
 
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Solution 1
Posted October 17, 2014 1:59 am

XeQymy
XeQymy
Reps: 102
I have experienced a similar situation. With this type of problems, your options are limited. First of all, I suggest trying to find triggers that cause the behaviors and work from there. I also strongly recommend documenting everything. This will help you support your claims when considering the possibility of moving him or other accommodations.
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HyNusa
HyNusa
Reps: 80
Finding the trigger that causes the behavior may help the behavior die down completely, or at least help you be able to maintain the behavior.
  Posted on: October 17, 2014 5:15 pm

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Solution 2
Posted October 17, 2014 4:59 pm

Vypysy
Vypysy
Reps: 101
This is a common problem among teachers of EBD students. I agree that identifying what triggers this student is vital. From there it becomes necessary teach to him how to deal with stress and negative stimulus. Using reinforcement is another tool that teachers can use for this student. Positive reinforcement for good behavior will help encourage proper behavior. On the other end, discouraging negative behavior will help him see what is unacceptable in class.
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Solution 3
Posted October 17, 2014 5:11 pm

HyNusa
HyNusa
Reps: 80
I dealt with a similar situation last year, I had one student that would disrupt the whole learning environment. I documented his every move, and eventually he was placed in a different setting. I feel that it is better to change one studentís schedule and them have to adjust, rather than nobody being able to learn anything. I would call for a meeting with the IEP team after having documented for a few weeks to a month and decide as a team what is best for everyone involved.
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Solution 4
Posted October 19, 2014 3:55 pm

aGeVyQ
aGeVyQ
Reps: 104
A functional behavior assessment should be completed and then implement a Behavior Intervention Plan. In the BIP, it would include incentives that he could work toward when he exhibits the approapriate behaviors. I would also consider implementing a class token economy system.
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Solution 5
Posted October 17, 2014 12:00 pm

qyDyXu
qyDyXu
Reps: 106
This is always a tough issue to deal with. Other students in the classroom have the right to learn and not be constantly disrupted by one student. Talking to the EBD parent is always helpful. Parents want the best for their child. The parent may be willing to support you with the administration on moving the student even in the middle of the year. Explain the benefits of the move for their child.
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Solution 6
Posted October 17, 2014 11:25 pm

vyPety
vyPety
Reps: 105
First, you need to try and discover what is causing this student to be so frustrated. If it is this bad, I imagined there is already someone from the outside looking in, such as a school psychologist or a pediatrician. Next, try to build a relationship with this student. Gain his trust so he wants to perform for you. Some of the ways you can do this are by remaining calm when he throws fits, engaging in conversation with him, and giving him responsibilities such as passing out papers, picking up papers, cleaning up the classroom, etc.
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Solution 7
Posted October 18, 2014 6:23 pm

Heather Long
Heather Long
Reps: 103
Moving students to EBD classes in my county in the middle of the year is not uncommon where I teach. In fact, it's more common for it to happen as the data has been collected and evidence of behaviors have been shown. Build a trusting relationship with this student. Do not use the word 'bad' in the classroom. Write "honest notes" home--not good notes or bad notes, just honest notes. This helps students take responsibility of their actions. Ultimately, allow this student to be successful. Even if he is sitting in his seat--praise that! It sounds silly like, "Why would I reward something they should already been doing!" It's hard to get passed but you must change your mindset and allow this child to succeed at anything even if it is something he should already be doing.
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Solution 8
Posted October 18, 2014 9:17 pm

Leslie Studdard
Leslie Studdard
Reps: 101
No fully understanding who "they" are, I have thought of a solution based on "they" being administration. Have the behavior specialist from the county that you work in to come in and give you suggestions that will help this particular child.
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Solution 9
Posted October 18, 2014 11:27 pm

aMaDyS
aMaDyS
Reps: 99
I am able to identify what you are working with in terms of students with who has been identified EBD. I have come up with strategies that work well for me in assisting him academically and behaviorally. The first thing is I have small task or duties that I assign to him. For example, if we are taking notes during class, I will allow him to sit at my desk and click through the power point as his peers take notes. Also, I will give him opportunities to do something he enjoys if he has good behavior two to three out of the five days we are at school. So if he has good behavior, he is able to play games and listen to music on the computer. One day during class, after I calmed him down from a tantrum, I sat down with him and created a YouTube playlist that contained cleaned versions of some of his favorite songs (granted they did not contain sexual or violent lyrics).
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