TeacherServer.com
Home | How It Works | Stats
Login | Register
     
 
Topic Go Back
 
     
     
 
Case
Posted on November 16, 2012 2:00 am
Add to Favorites Add to Favorites

Yasar Bodur
Yasar Bodur
Reps: 614
Smelly Kid
I guess I am still considered a novice teacher because I have been teaching for four years only. I am an elementary school teacher who teaches in a mostly White suburban setting. Couple of weeks ago a new student joined my classroom. He and his parents recently moved from Eastern Europe. His father works at the local university as a music professor. I am not sure what his mother does. He is a wonderful child. Although he speaks little English, he tries to participate in class activities and to make friends with others in the classroom. Couple days after he arrived, I noticed a strange smell around him. I was sure that it was body odor. The other students in the classroom started noticing it too. They started making fun of him. I learned in my multicultural classes when I was at the university that not all cultures promote taking showers everyday, and that body odor is not considered a problem everywhere in the world. Now I have a big dilemma. If I tell my student about it, I might embarrass him. If I sent a note to his parents, I may appear disrespectful toward their culture. But the way he is treated in the classroom by the other students is becoming a real problem. What should I do?
 
     
     
 
Reply Submit a Possible Solution
Please read response(s) below (if any) before posting your solution.
 
     
     
 
Solution 1
Posted December 8, 2012 3:41 pm

Anna Washinger
Anna Washinger
Reps: 121
I have seen students make fun of another student for having body odor. It is so discomforting to see. I would start by sending a respectful letter home to the parents or ask if they were able to meet for a conference. Whichever method you choose, I would make sure to center the conversation or point around the child's well-being and feelings. Let the parents know that other children are making fun of their child because of his body odor, and even though that could be culturally acceptable from where they are from, you do not want it to affect the child emotionally because students are teasing him about it. I would then let them know how well he is doing in the class and how bright and willing to participate he is. Make sure to enforce that you would not want the teasing to affect that either.
Votes: +57 / -2 Vote Up This Solution Is Useful   Vote Down This Solution Is Not Useful  

Comments posted for this solution

Nicki Kinner
Nicki Kinner
Reps: 68
This is a great idea. The teacher wants to make sure that this could effect the student emotionally. Even though you want the student to embrace his culture on all levels it might be important to embrace some American cultures as well.
  Posted on: June 4, 2013 12:19 pm

Brittany Smith
Brittany Smith
Reps: 69
Great solution! I definitely think that getting the parents involved is the best solution. The teacher could also teach the entire class the importance of being clean if he or she is sure to do so in a way that does not single the student out. Whatever the teacher chooses to do, it must be respectful and carefully considered to ensure that the parents do not completely shut themselves off to the teacher or the situation, which could have devastating effects on their son.
  Posted on: June 4, 2013 3:25 pm

vezaMu
vezaMu
Reps: 85
I agree completely that it is very important to keep the conversation focused around the child's well-being and feelings. Great suggestions.
  Posted on: June 6, 2013 1:49 pm

LaChristen Boyd
LaChristen Boyd
Reps: 68
Yes a conference would be a good idea. However, what would you say if the parents refuse to change their ways because of their culture? Are you going to tell them that their child will continue getting picked on and it will be their fault. This is a very fragile situation especially when neither side is necessarily wrong.
  Posted on: June 4, 2014 8:45 pm

Megan Teague
Megan Teague
Reps: 55
Great idea! You can communicate to parents without disrespecting them. Letting them know that you are only concerned about his feeling being hurt. Educating them on why that situation is happening should be short and sweet and to the point.
  Posted on: June 6, 2014 7:56 pm

SaSyXu
SaSyXu
Reps: 105
I definitely agree that the focus should be on the child's feelings!
  Posted on: October 21, 2014 8:15 pm

aHeRaL
aHeRaL
Reps: 112
You bring up a good point to focus on the child's well being and feelings and not on the negative behavior in class. This hopefully helps to focus the conversation in a different light and helps keep the parents from becoming defensive or offended.
  Posted on: October 24, 2014 7:43 pm

aQazuV
aQazuV
Reps: 105
I agree that you should focus on the child's psychological well-being. No parent wants to hear that their child is being made fun of so I'm sure they will be accepting and willing help in order to protect their child. The child's academics are first priority and I think all parties will agree.
  Posted on: October 25, 2014 4:02 pm

NyVyTy
NyVyTy
Reps: 90
I think that a conference would be a good idea, but what do you do if the parents become offended at topic of the conference? What if the parents decide they're going to continue to allow the child to practice their beliefs? This was a tough situation. I think that before I called the parents in for a conference, reminding the students that different cultures hold different beliefs and we must learn to respect them all is very important as well.
  Posted on: October 26, 2014 5:51 pm

aheduX
aheduX
Reps: 112
I agree with you. I think that this is a great idea. The parents need to be informed with what is happening at school. Of course, I would be completely understandable if it had something to do with their culture. I would also address how the other students are handling the odor as well. I would point out that their student is a bright student and that I do not want this to affect his learning or become angry.
  Posted on: October 27, 2014 7:20 pm

ezasyp
ezasyp
Reps: 107
I think it is extremely important to keep in mind that the student could be affected by the situation at hand. I agree that it is important for the parents to understand the situation at hand. The parents need to realize that you are not being negative toward their culture, but you are concerned about the other students making fun of their child. I did not think about a parent conference. I think this would be an even better idea. I would just want the solution to be resolved quickly so the parents would have to be able to come in as soon as possible.
  Posted on: October 29, 2014 4:08 pm

Qureby
Qureby
Reps: 102
This is a really great solution. I liked that you focused on how the body odor is affecting the student's well-being while also letting the parents know that he is a bright student who is very willing to participate. I think the parents will be willing to work with you based on your efforts.
  Posted on: November 2, 2014 7:23 pm

GyJeWy
GyJeWy
Reps: 105
Great post! It's important to always let the parents know what their child does really well.
  Posted on: November 2, 2014 10:21 pm

jamasy
jamasy
Reps: 67
I believe having a parent teacher conference is a great idea but I would conduct it a little differently. I would present the facts of the situation and allow the parents to decide what to do instead of trying to persuade them one way or the other.
  Posted on: June 1, 2015 8:28 pm

yzaSeR
yzaSeR
Reps: 68
I agree that the meeting should revolve around their child's well being and how he is being treated in class. That way it is not necessarily a difference in cultures, but how their son is being treated in class.
  Posted on: June 3, 2015 1:37 pm

Chris Clark
Chris Clark
Reps: 70
I agree with you that a conference is necessary. Also, like you, I think that stressing your focus on their child's emotional well-being and academics is so important. That really sets the right tone for what could be a potentially uncomfortable discussion. If the parents do not want to change their hygiene habits, then have a discussion with them about what could be done to help the child feel respected in the classroom. Ultimately, I believe that it's going to be up to the parents to decide a course of action with which everyone is comfortable.
  Posted on: June 4, 2015 4:29 am

emuZuW
emuZuW
Reps: 69
I really like your solution. I think that it is well thought out and considerate of culture. However, you are addressing the major concern which is the child's well-being. Well done.
  Posted on: June 4, 2015 9:47 pm

Meagan Cook
Meagan Cook
Reps: 53
I love your idea of a conference. I would start with that and use the sandwich method to focus on the child's good and then touch on the odor situation.
  Posted on: June 4, 2015 11:10 pm

yteduM
yteduM
Reps: 77
I like your solution and think it is a good way to handle this delicate situation. Some solutions I have read say DO NOT get the parents involved but I personally think this is a matter that the child cannot help himself so parents need to be aware. Having a child picked on because of something that is normal in their society but not here is hard for the child and teacher to experience.
  Posted on: June 5, 2015 2:49 pm

HyZery
HyZery
Reps: 70
Thank you for the wonderful post! I agree with your approach of involving the parents and your focus on the well being of the child. I might start the conversation with how well the student is doing in the classroom and other positive comments prior to discussing the problem though.
  Posted on: June 5, 2015 5:14 pm

zyWyma
zyWyma
Reps: 70
I agree that the parents need to be contacted in some form and made aware of the situation. I also think that it is important to keep the focus of the conversation on the well being of the child. The only thing that I would do different from what you have suggested is to open with the positives about the student. This will help the parents fell like you are on their side and supportive of their child.
  Posted on: June 7, 2015 4:52 am

Katy Fitzgibbons
Katy Fitzgibbons
Reps: 71
Parents do indeed need to be contacted and made aware of the situation. I would meet with the parents first before approaching the student. This may be a situation that the parents wish to handle privately with their child; however, the teacher does need to make it known that he or she is willing to help in any way.
  Posted on: June 8, 2015 1:35 am

Brad McMahon
Brad McMahon
Reps: 71
I agree that the parents of the child should be contacted, but I also suggest that the students that are making fun of the student should be dealt with as well. These students cannot be allowed to bully the student, regardless of the reason.
  Posted on: June 8, 2015 4:30 am

Syjetu
Syjetu
Reps: 70
I like how you mention the teacher should make the topic about the students emotional well-being. Therefore, it does not seem as if he is being rude. Maybe the student finds that Americans stink and this could turn into a culture lesson!
  Posted on: June 10, 2015 2:45 am

deTusa
deTusa
Reps: 74
I had not thought about conferencing with the parents about the issue. That is actually a really good idea. That way the parents could present the issue to the student and they could figure out a solution together.
  Posted on: June 12, 2015 1:30 pm

Puzesu
Puzesu
Reps: 21
I agree with this. Good post. Also, maybe do a life skills lesson with the whole class and impose how important hygiene can be. Maybe he will go home and tell his parents of this or take it upon himself to shower and wear deodorant if he realizes it is a norm here.
  Posted on: June 13, 2015 6:50 pm

PumuMu
PumuMu
Reps: 203
I really like your solution, and I think it will be very helpful. I agree this is a problem and having a solution to this problem can help be a better teacher without having to deal with the bad stuff.
  Posted on: October 13, 2015 6:08 pm

Japuje
Japuje
Reps: 107
I agree that the teacher should discuss this directly with the parents through a meeting or by sending a respectful letter home. I would prefer the meeting over the letter that way you can more thoroughly explain the dilemma to the parents and show them you are there because you care about their child's well being.
  Posted on: October 19, 2015 4:13 pm

ehyNyn
ehyNyn
Reps: 109
I definitely think it is important to keep the child's well-being at the forefront of this problem. Kids can be mean, and, a lot of times, they are relentless. I believe you have an adult conversation with the parents and let them make up their mind as to whether or not to respond by beginning to emphasize bathing. This may be a situation that the parents do not realize that bathing is part of the American culture. At least, in my opinion, it is necessary to inform the parents of this.
  Posted on: October 20, 2015 11:36 pm

Kateline Vaughn
Kateline Vaughn
Reps: 106
That is a great solution. I think involving the parents shows them that you really do care about his well-being and want to protect him. Even though it can be uncomfortable, it is something that must be done.
  Posted on: October 26, 2015 11:13 pm

Amanda Robinson
Amanda Robinson
Reps: 98
I also agree that a conference would be a great idea. It is a way to meet the parents and express how well their student is doing but also address the situation at hand.
  Posted on: November 2, 2015 2:11 am

Reply Add a Comment
 
     
     
 
Solution 2
Posted June 2, 2014 9:21 pm

Laura Toft
Laura Toft
Reps: 71
Hygiene can be a sensitive subject but I think it's best to tackle this dilemma head on. You could do a mini lesson in health on bodily hygiene and have the students journal about ways they take care of their bodies. Drawing pictures or writing could show you insight on how he takes care of himself; then you could write back or have mini confrence with the child to discuss other ways to extend his normal routine. Talking to his parents is also an option. Asking them if the son has expressed any troubles with his classmates to then lead you in to a discussion would be a safe way to approach the problem. As long as you approach the situation carefully and show you're expressing the best interest for everyone I believe the problem can be addressed without hurting anyone's feelings.
Votes: +24 / -5 Vote Up This Solution Is Useful   Vote Down This Solution Is Not Useful  

Comments posted for this solution

Michael Herndon
Michael Herndon
Reps: 68
I believe going to the parents is the first thing to do. You want to ensure that you do not offend the child by speaking to him or her about hygiene without parents present. If you do a lesson on hygiene, the other students will know the reason for the lesson and this will more than likely contribute to the students making fun of the child.
  Posted on: June 3, 2014 9:44 pm

Caley Copeland
Caley Copeland
Reps: 69
Laura, I like your idea of doing a mini lesson to teach the student how to take care of his body. Contacting the parents is also an option, and I like how you suggested to approach the subject to make it more positive.
  Posted on: June 6, 2014 3:43 am

Ashley Mays
Ashley Mays
Reps: 64
I think it is best to contact the parents in this situation as well as conduct the lesson on hygiene. I like how you said to focus on stating that you have the best interest of the child in mine. This helps the parents know that you care about their child and that you are coming from a good place.
  Posted on: June 6, 2014 8:37 pm

jamasy
jamasy
Reps: 67
I think you need to go to his parents before conferencing with the student about this issue at school. The student would likely go home and tell his parents and such actions could anger them. Always try to develop and maintain a good working relationship with your parents and situations like this one could ruin such a relationship.
  Posted on: June 1, 2015 8:31 pm

avuNaD
avuNaD
Reps: 36
I love your solution for this problem! I think that having the students draw pictures about how they take care of themselves after going over the hygiene is very important! You are able to see what he does daily to take care of himself can help you to see what might be missing. Meeting with the child individually is also important because you do not want to put the student on blast in front of the entire classroom. I also think that meeting with the parents is crucial. They will be able to give other insight as well. I love how you discussed asking the parents about if the student has had any issues with students in the classroom and then leading into how or what could make it better. During this time I think it is important to remain sensitive to the child's needs, feelings, and if there is a cultural belief.
  Posted on: June 2, 2015 1:40 am

Monica Rainwater
Monica Rainwater
Reps: 71
I agree, I feel like it is best to address the situation with a mini-lesson for the whole class, rather than singling him out. Body odor is a universal problem with children from all cultures, and sometimes they just need to know the knowledge about body changes and cleanliness. I like your idea about having the students journal or draw pictures. Meeting with students 1:1 during Writer's Workshop would not be anything out of the ordinary, so it wouldn't bring about any unnecessary attention to that specific student.
  Posted on: June 2, 2015 3:26 pm

aQanaD
aQanaD
Reps: 67
I love the idea of using this as a teaching point for the entire class rather than singling him out. However, let's be honest. If you are smelling the child, the other students probably are too. It is important that students do not have the lesson and immediately point fingers and giggle because they've smelled this child too. I would first and foremost talk to the parents and then give a lesson. Why not be open about the situation and provide learning opportunities about other countries at this time. Hygiene in our country is different than other countries and students can be told this!
  Posted on: June 3, 2015 1:29 am

ReMuXy
ReMuXy
Reps: 78
This is an amazing solution. I never would have thought about doing a mini lesson on hygiene, however, I think this would be a great way of helping him without calling him out. I do think that this is a sensitive subject and think that the teacher should consider alternate ways of perusing the issue.
  Posted on: June 3, 2015 3:53 pm

Chris Clark
Chris Clark
Reps: 70
I like your idea of leading the parent conference by asking if their child has shared any concerns with them. Usually, if the child is being picked on, he will have already shared this with his parents. I agree with you that, if the conversation is approached from a place of respect and care, then it doesn't have to be an uncomfortable, negative thing. Ultimately, both the teacher and the parents want what is best for the student, so it makes sense to be open and honest and work together for a solution.
  Posted on: June 4, 2015 4:21 am

Sarah Davis
Sarah Davis
Reps: 69
I agree that a mini hygiene lesson would be a great way to address the issue at hand. In this lesson, I believe that the teacher should also address the class as a whole the appropriate way to address peers who may have these issues. I also like your idea of leading a parent conference by asking if the parents if their child has mentioned any issues; this allows the parents to open up and for the teacher to address the issue head on.
  Posted on: June 4, 2015 7:02 pm

emuZuW
emuZuW
Reps: 69
I want to agree with your solution but parts of it make me disagree. I feel that by doing the lesson many questions and concerns (that you likely aren't prepared for) could arise and create more than one issue. Many different cultures and races go about hygiene and care differently and if you get a group of elementary students together to hash them out and talk about them I'm sure new information will be exchanged and judgments will be dished out. Understandings could vary and complaints or concerns will likely come from parents in days to follow.
  Posted on: June 4, 2015 9:53 pm

Beth Jackson
Beth Jackson
Reps: 71
I think having a lesson about hygiene is a good idea as long as it does not seem completely out of place with the remainder of your lessons. I would not want to randomly hold this lesson, because then other students would probably catch onto the real reason behind the lesson. Instead, figure out a way to make the lesson fit in with a health topic. Once you read through the studentís journal, you will have a better idea of the parent support at home and how to address the issue with the parents. I do not believe I would discuss this with the student prior to talking with the parents.
  Posted on: June 6, 2015 7:01 pm

yBySuL
yBySuL
Reps: 70
I lesson on hygiene is important and can be incorporated with another lesson. It may embarrass him or he may be able to understand and correct the issue. The kids would stop teasing him and things would improve. Have a cultures lesson along the way as well for all the students so he can be familiar with out differences as well.
  Posted on: June 8, 2015 3:57 am

Syjetu
Syjetu
Reps: 70
I like the idea of a mini lesson on hygiene; however, if it is unrelated to the subject area then there is high possibility that could produce bullying. I can see students drawing the student in their picture or murmuring comments under their breath. Nevertheless, it would be a good idea to see what his daily routine is before speaking with his parents.
  Posted on: June 10, 2015 2:48 am

deTusa
deTusa
Reps: 74
I think a lesson about hygiene would be a great idea. Something short and sweet would get the point across and the student could make their own conclusion about we they wanted to do about the situation.
  Posted on: June 12, 2015 1:31 pm

Japuje
Japuje
Reps: 107
I believe the best way would be to meet with his parents. I wouldn't do the mini lesson because it seems like it would single him out since he's the only "smelly kid" in the class. The other students would probably catch on that the lesson is about him which may cause them to make fun of him even more.
  Posted on: October 19, 2015 4:15 pm

ehyNyn
ehyNyn
Reps: 109
I would definitely be careful about having a lesson on hygiene, especially if the other students have started noticing that he has body odor. Prior to having a hygiene lesson, I would make sure the student or the parents have had a conversation with the counselor. I just feel that this is a situation in which the child's well-being has to be considered.
  Posted on: October 20, 2015 11:46 pm

Kristen Bagwell
Kristen Bagwell
Reps: 107
This is an excellent idea! All students, particularly elementary students who have bodies that are changing and developing, need reminding of proper hygiene techniques. I'm not sure that you need as in-depth of an activity/assignment as you describe, but I think some sort of mini-lesson on hygiene would remind students and not "call out" the new student.
  Posted on: October 22, 2015 12:43 pm

uPaSeW
uPaSeW
Reps: 209
I like the idea of having a health lesson on hygiene. If you are completing this type of lesson with the whole class, it may not be as embarrassing for the student. I also like the idea of conferencing with the students to go over good hygiene habits.


  Posted on: October 25, 2015 7:55 pm

ezajaV
ezajaV
Reps: 102
I really like your idea of having a mini-lesson on personal hygiene and have them write in a journal. I feel that this will give you a really good idea of where he came from.
  Posted on: October 26, 2015 12:00 pm

Kateline Vaughn
Kateline Vaughn
Reps: 106
I think that it is a great idea to involve the whole class in this issue. I'm sure at some point they are all going to need to experience this conversation. I think you also made a good point by asking what students could do to even further have good hygiene. By having a whole group conversation, you are not pointing out just one child. If this solution does not work, then you must contact the child or his parents directly.
  Posted on: October 26, 2015 11:16 pm

Daisy Dumler
Daisy Dumler
Reps: 106
I think that a mini lesson on hygiene would be a great way. Maybe the child would realize that he smells a little and address the issue himself.
  Posted on: October 31, 2015 8:39 pm

Amanda Robinson
Amanda Robinson
Reps: 98
If the other students in the class notice the smell, I do not think that a lesson on hygiene is a good idea. It seems to point out the obvious fact that the child does not shower and puts him at risk for more ridicule.
  Posted on: November 2, 2015 2:12 am

kelsey karr
kelsey karr
Reps: 105
Is it necessary to discuss hygiene with all the students not to single out the student that smells? What if you simply tell the student about his or her hygiene and try to help them out first hand after reaching out to the parents? There are many different ways to go about this issue. The problem is thinking of which way to first address it.
  Posted on: July 10, 2016 10:08 pm

Reply Add a Comment
 
     
     
 
Solution 3
Posted October 30, 2013 2:42 pm

Jessica Briley
Jessica Briley
Reps: 109
As a lot of people have already suggested, I think having a private conference with the parents first would be a great idea. I don't think the child should necessarily be involved in the conference because you don't want to embarrass him. However, I think bringing the nurse in to discuss hygiene would be helpful also. After you have a conference with the parents you could ask them if they would like to explain this to their child or have them explain together in another conference like setting. I'm not sure if I think it's a good idea to tell the students that some cultures don't treat hygiene the same as we do because I have this fear that their immediate reaction would be something like: "EWW!" We are talking elementary kids. I do think they need to be told not to pick on the kid though.
Votes: +12 / -0 Vote Up This Solution Is Useful   Vote Down This Solution Is Not Useful  

Comments posted for this solution

TeTugu
TeTugu
Reps: 21
I agree with having a conference with the parents to discuss solutions for the student's hygiene. I also like the idea of bringing the nurse in to discuss the facts of poor hygiene. The class should also be reminded that teasing other students is unacceptable in the classroom and the teacher should not tolerate that type of behavior.
  Posted on: November 3, 2013 12:41 pm

udydyV
udydyV
Reps: 108
I agree that having a private conference with the parents is a good first start. I also like the idea of having the parents explain to the child the issues about hygiene. If it is cultural, the parents should be the ones explaining their reasons for allowing or not allowing their child to take a shower.
  Posted on: November 3, 2013 12:46 pm

Myzusy
Myzusy
Reps: 113
I agree with your thoughts on having the parents explain to the child why he needs to change cultural bathing habits. Having the school nurse teach the child about hygiene is also a great idea. Perhaps the parents could also be involved with the meeting with the nurse to reinforce the ideas of cleanliness and the reasons why it is needed.
  Posted on: October 28, 2014 2:10 am

Kayla Mullins
Kayla Mullins
Reps: 89
I also think if you plan to talk with the parents during a private meeting that the student should not be involved. It is also important to make the parents feel comfortable meaning do not make them feel bad by having so many people in the meeting. This can make people feel embarassed and shut down. I would talk with them with the company of the principal. This will allow another person to hear exactly what you say so that your words do not get twisted.
-Kayla Mullins
  Posted on: October 29, 2014 8:13 pm

vabehe
vabehe
Reps: 69
I think the school nurse would be a great resource as well! School nurses have a knack and compassion to deal with these types of situations. They also have resources and hygiene products for the student if he needs it. Though this is likely a cultural situation, the child should be given opportunity to rectify the problem. What if the family is poor and unable to purchase hygiene items? What if they want to fit in to the culture, but don't have the means to do so? The nurse would be an excellent resource. If he goes to the nurses office and receives some tangible items, he won't be embarrassed in front of the class and he can receive help.
  Posted on: June 2, 2015 3:47 am

Kaitlin Stringer
Kaitlin Stringer
Reps: 116
I like your idea of having a conversation with the parents, but I do not think that should be the first step taken. I think planning a health lesson or possibly talking with the individual student might be a better first approach to the topic. If after these steps, nothing is changing, then I might involve the parents. I would make sure that they knew I was not insulting their culture, but that in America it is important to maintain personal hygiene.
  Posted on: June 2, 2015 3:08 pm

Alyssa Wright
Alyssa Wright
Reps: 69
I agree some type of mini lesson should be taught in regards to respectful behavior. I did not think of the parent conference to begin with but I do think it would prove beneficial in this case. The teacher would need to be careful of how they talked in regards to the child's home culture versus the American expectation. It is important to embrace their culture without pushing the American culture at them too quickly.
  Posted on: June 6, 2015 4:53 am

Beth Jackson
Beth Jackson
Reps: 71
I agree, I would involve the parents before talking about this directly to the student. The teacher isn't 100% on the beliefs of the student, therefore doesn't know if the odor is due to a cultural belief. I would talk with the parents before bringing the conversation up to the student. It is good to have all the details before making the situation any worse for the student.
  Posted on: June 6, 2015 7:05 pm

nydyra
nydyra
Reps: 202
Thank you for this. Talking to the parents is necessary because the child needs their help and support.
  Posted on: October 17, 2015 7:32 am

Kristen Bagwell
Kristen Bagwell
Reps: 107
I hadn't thought of bringing in the nurse (only the counselor), but this is an excellent idea. I also think that having a face-to-face meeting first (rather than a letter) is a better choice. Like you say, I'm not sure the child needs to be involved because it might cause him to retreat after he has made so much progress (making friends, participating in class, etc.).
  Posted on: October 22, 2015 12:45 pm

Amanda Whittaker
Amanda Whittaker
Reps: 114
I think this would be a great idea. I never thought of bringing the nurse into the situation. They would be able to explain hygiene to the parents. Asking them who they want to talk to the child is also a good idea. They may not know how to explain the situation and would rather have the nurse do it.
  Posted on: October 27, 2015 3:52 pm

Reply Add a Comment
 
     
     
 
Solution 4
Posted December 8, 2012 11:00 pm

Erin Warren
Erin Warren
Reps: 142
I to, use the nurse for these situations but also we teach health lessons on this topic. We discss teeth brushing, showering, etc just because not all students do it and many of my parents work several jobs and arent home often. If this didnt work, I would discuss it with the parents in person. I dont feel that this is an "over the phone" conversation. I would also NOT tell the parents that the kids are making fun of their child. I do not think it would help the situation and It might make the parents feel uncomfortable that you didnt do anything about it.
Votes: +7 / -0 Vote Up This Solution Is Useful   Vote Down This Solution Is Not Useful  

Comments posted for this solution

Megan Teague
Megan Teague
Reps: 55
I like your idea about the nurse and informing everyone in the classroom about good hygiene, but I donít agree (respectfully) that the teacher should not tell the parents about their child being made fun of. I think if you kept that part out, it might seem as if the teacher is complaining. I think the parents need to know why itís happening. I think the teacher needs to inform them that he or she does not put up with people making fun of him, but they need to know the reason behind the whole conversation. I think if it is done respectfully it will turn out okay.
  Posted on: June 6, 2014 8:01 pm

aHeRaL
aHeRaL
Reps: 112
I think it is important to be open and honest about what is going on in class, so as a part of the situation, I would find it necessary to let the parent's know that the students in class are behaving in a negative manner. If the odor is creating a class disruption, then it must be addressed, and I am sure the parents would appreciate the openness and honesty coming from you. Your purpose is not to hurt or insult the student or parents, but to help them better acclimate themselves to the new cultural and academic environment.
  Posted on: October 24, 2014 7:46 pm

Ashley Noe
Ashley Noe
Reps: 99
I'd do the same thing. It is a sensitive subject.
  Posted on: March 1, 2015 8:20 pm

Nicole Turner
Nicole Turner
Reps: 70
I also agree that telling the parents that other students are making fun of him is a bad idea. I like the idea of the nurse coming in and doing the mini lesson. That way it is addressing all of the students and not just that one student.
  Posted on: June 4, 2015 8:37 pm

Katy Fitzgibbons
Katy Fitzgibbons
Reps: 71
I agree; it is imperative that the parents be informed of the issue. I believe it is best for the teacher to inform the parents that it is just an atypical odor because I would not want to insult the parents by insinuating that they don't have good hygiene. As the teacher I would approach the parents in person about the issue without notifying the student to ensure that he doesn't get embarrassed. However, I would assure the parents that you are willing to assist them in the matter in any way possible.
  Posted on: June 8, 2015 1:39 am

Brad McMahon
Brad McMahon
Reps: 71
I like your idea about conducting a class on personal health. I think this would benefit all students. I do not agree with your position that the parents should not be told that their child is being made fun of. I think the parents need to be informed of this so they can make a decision that takes all factors into account. They may be upset that their child is being made fun of, but they have no grounds to be mad about the teacher not doing anything. The teacher should intervene in the bullying situation and talk to the parents.
  Posted on: June 8, 2015 4:33 am

Reply Add a Comment
 
     
     
 
Solution 5
Posted December 9, 2012 10:41 pm

Suzi Hancock
Suzi Hancock
Reps: 134
I like the idea of deferring this issue to the guidance counselor or school nurse. They can take care of such a sensitive issue in a professional way, and then you won't look/feel like the bad guy. You don't want this poor kid to be made fun of, but you don't want to offend his people, so ask the guidance counselor or nurse to step in and help you out.
Votes: +7 / -6 Vote Up This Solution Is Useful   Vote Down This Solution Is Not Useful  

Comments posted for this solution

Jessica Heilman
Jessica Heilman
Reps: 58
This is also a good idea. I did not think of this. Talking to the counselor and/or school nurse would look better than a teacher doing it I believe. Sometimes parents get offended by what teachers do.
  Posted on: June 3, 2013 7:02 am

Emilee Roberts
Emilee Roberts
Reps: 69
I also thought about the guidance counselor. I think that this could be a great way to help you as a classroom teacher break the ice about this uneasy topic.
  Posted on: June 5, 2013 10:03 am

Carol Whitfield
Carol Whitfield
Reps: 56
Yes, I agree. I think that is a great solution to take the issue to the guidance counselor or nurse. They could probably help ease the pressures of offending the kid and his family. This is such a tricky situation, but it definitely needs to be handled. The kids who are making fun of the child also need to be dealt with as well.
  Posted on: June 6, 2013 10:40 am

Monique Cook
Monique Cook
Reps: 70
I agree. This is a great Consuelo issue and even a great time for a hygiene/culture lesson.
  Posted on: June 9, 2013 9:23 pm

Emily West
Emily West
Reps: 102
I agree that going to the school nurse and counselor with the issue would be a good idea. They probably have more experience with this type of situation and could help you find the best way to approach the situation.
  Posted on: October 21, 2013 3:09 pm

zuPeQy
zuPeQy
Reps: 99
I think taking the issue to the guidance counselor is a good idea because he or she may know a way to discuss the issue to the parents in the most beneficial way possible. I would also mention to the class that it is not okay to tease and pick on people, regardless of the situation.
  Posted on: October 27, 2014 6:27 pm

Melissa Aspinwall
Melissa Aspinwall
Reps: 79
I think it would be better to invite the counselor or nurse to the meeting with the parents. I personally would want to be part of the conference. I believe the CAP situation can work with parents along with students. I would want them to know I am concerned and willing to help any way that I can.
  Posted on: June 7, 2015 4:45 am

Reply Add a Comment
 
     
     
 
Solution 6
Posted December 9, 2012 5:19 pm

John Buxton
John Buxton
Reps: 114
At this point, being disrespectful is a risk you must take. Regardless of their culture, if they are financially able to bathe, they should. You must confront the parents in the most respectful way possible. They need to know that his body odor is an issue that needs to be resolved. If nothing changes he will continue to get picked on and be a distraction to everyone including you. This is a case where it is OK to risk being disrespectful to another culture.
Votes: +5 / -0 Vote Up This Solution Is Useful   Vote Down This Solution Is Not Useful  

Comments posted for this solution

Jessica Briley
Jessica Briley
Reps: 109
I agree that this will be a risk and might seem disrespectful at first. But, hopefully if the teacher were to bring in a counselor and possibly the school nurse to explain the importance of hygiene and that the kids may begin to bully their child they may understand.
  Posted on: October 30, 2013 2:46 pm

Reply Add a Comment
 
     
     
 
Solution 7
Posted June 5, 2014 3:41 pm

Ashley Mays
Ashley Mays
Reps: 64
In my opinion, the best way to handle this situation is to set up a conference with the child's parents. I do not believe that a note sent home would be effective because it could be interpreted disrespectfully and you want the parents to know that you care and not passing judgement. Though it may be uncomfortable, I would want the parents to know what is going on in the classroom and why it is happening. I think it would be best for the parents to discuss what is going on at school with their child based on hygiene. One way that you could discuss this issue in the classroom without pointing the student out is to do a lesson on hygiene. This may be done through a read aloud. This could help students see the importance of taking care of themselves through showering, brushing their teeth and hair daily, and etc.
Votes: +5 / -0 Vote Up This Solution Is Useful   Vote Down This Solution Is Not Useful  

Comments posted for this solution

Jennifer Loncon
Jennifer Loncon
Reps: 68
I agree that a note home could easily be misinterpreted. A face to face conference is a better route to ensure that the parents understand that you are only trying to look out for the best interest of their child and their transition into the classroom. The child seems to be enjoyed himself so far, and I would hate to seem him start to back track.
  Posted on: June 6, 2014 2:19 am

egyveW
egyveW
Reps: 103
I agree that it would be difficult to set a good tone with a letter, and this is not a situation where you want to risk offending or embarrassing the parents or the student.
  Posted on: October 24, 2014 11:37 pm

yXeBeX
yXeBeX
Reps: 114
I agree that a face-to-face conference would be much more personal and sensitive that a note sent home about the issue. It is totally possible that the parents might bring up the issue first. Maybe their child has come home and complained about other kids picking on them and they would like to figure out how to help the situation. This would be a perfect opportunity to elaborate on the issue and emphasize the importance of hygiene in the American culture.
  Posted on: October 25, 2014 2:02 pm

aQazuV
aQazuV
Reps: 105
I agree that a face to face conference is the best solution to the situation. The parents should be willing to help if it is effecting the child's success at school. I do not believe that a whole class discussion on the issue would be best because the students would know who you are directing the lesson at if they are already making fun of that student. However, I would speak to the student individually.
  Posted on: October 25, 2014 4:12 pm

LeHyZa
LeHyZa
Reps: 107
A read aloud lesson may be a good idea. However, I would see how the conference goes with the parents prior to enacting this lesson as it may only draw attention toward the student. As a general reminder, I would certainly remind students that respect in the classroom is mandatory and that bullying/teasing won't be tolerated.
  Posted on: November 1, 2014 9:28 pm

Monica Rainwater
Monica Rainwater
Reps: 71
This is a touch situation. I'm not sure that a parent conference is the first step I would take. Who knows as to why the boy has a body odor? It could be cultural, or it could be just because he hasn't been explicitly taught about personal hygiene. I have an 11 year old son, and hygiene is very important in this household, but it is still like pulling teeth to get him to shower or brush his teeth at times. Back to the boy in the story, if it is a cultural issue, and there is a language barrier, even with the use of a translator that conversation could be really uncomfortable for the teacher, as well as the parents. I'm thinking a mini-lesson with the whole class might be the most comfortable way to approach it, and then if that doesn't work, then move on the next step.
  Posted on: June 2, 2015 3:39 pm

Reply Add a Comment
 
     
     
 
Solution 8
Posted December 9, 2012 9:43 am

Sarah Hogan Johnson
Sarah Hogan Johnson
Reps: 162
I don't know that I would contact the parents about this situation. My concern would be that the parents may find this disrespectful. If contacting them at all, I would approach this subject with the up most sensitivity. I would use my coworkers as a resource because I'm sure someone has had experience with this type of situation before. I would ask them how they handled the situation in the past, if they were successful, and what they may have done differently if they could. I would make it very clear to my students that making fun of any student for any reason was not acceptable and would certainly not be tolerated. I would remind the students that everyone has the right to feel safe and welcome in our classroom and their behavior should reflect this or there would be consequences.
Votes: +5 / -1 Vote Up This Solution Is Useful   Vote Down This Solution Is Not Useful  

Comments posted for this solution

Johnnie Skelton
Johnnie Skelton
Reps: 104
I think that your solution reflects that importance of remembering that the feelings of the student should be our biggest concern. If the teacher in this situation tells the student that he smells offensively, the teacher may become, in the eyes of the student, the biggest and most hurtful bully of all. Every student has some feature that could be singled out to make fun of by other students, if they chose to be cruel. The lesson that we need to teach our students is not that we all need to be perfect or the same but that we all need to be kind to one another.
  Posted on: June 5, 2013 11:54 am

TeTugu
TeTugu
Reps: 21
Asking other teachers about possible solutions is a good idea, but I feel that informing the parents about their student's hygiene is important.
  Posted on: November 3, 2013 12:49 pm

NyVyTy
NyVyTy
Reps: 90
I definitely agree with you in hesitating to contact the parent in this situation. This topic can be very offensive, and consulting with co workers is a great idea. I also agree, and posted this in my solution as well, that all students should be reminded to make others feel welcome and respect all cultures that are represented within the class.
  Posted on: October 26, 2014 5:53 pm

aheduX
aheduX
Reps: 112
I understand where you are coming from. The students feelings should be put first. I would definitely speak to the other students that are making fun of him. I would tell them that they are being disrespectful and need to view the student's side of the story before they judge someone. If the student became angry, I would have to contact the parents and discuss what is happening in class. The parents may not notice what is going on, but I would be willing to take that leap to help the student become dis-encouraged about learning.


  Posted on: October 27, 2014 7:24 pm

Ashley Smith
Ashley Smith
Reps: 107
While I agree with you that contacting the parents may be the most difficult solution to this problem, I think it is necessary in order to ultimately help the child. The caregivers have to be contacted if something is going to change outside the school setting, which is where the problem is beginning. I think the collaboration with other teachers would be a great way to gain insightful ideas on how to reach a solution with the cultural beliefs in mind.
  Posted on: November 2, 2014 11:39 pm

Danielle Brock
Danielle Brock
Reps: 100
Hygiene is vital!
  Posted on: March 1, 2015 11:07 pm

Meagan Cook
Meagan Cook
Reps: 53
I agree with you that we should always teach our classroom is safe for everyone!
  Posted on: June 4, 2015 11:13 pm

zyWyma
zyWyma
Reps: 70
I had not thought about having the nurse tell the students about hygiene. Depending on how the information is delivered, this could be a very good way to inform the student of what he or she may need to do.
  Posted on: June 7, 2015 4:56 am

uzyXuV
uzyXuV
Reps: 208
The parents should be informed about their son being teased. There could be an underlying health issue that is causing the body odor.
  Posted on: October 15, 2015 1:51 am

Reply Add a Comment
 
     
     
 
Solution 9
Posted December 8, 2012 11:27 pm

Jessica Oglesby
Jessica Oglesby
Reps: 110
I would begin by having a friendly chat with all of my students about body hygiene and finding ways to take care of our bodies in order to stay healthy. We could create a chart on the SmartBoard recording ways to take care of our bodies. I would reflect on how this particular student acted during the class discussion and I would give it a few days for the problem to crrect itself. If this student continues to smell then I will approach the parents in a friendly letter or conference. Or, I would get the counselor or school nurse involved to handle the situation, rather than having to handle this uncomfortable situation on my own.
Votes: +4 / -0 Vote Up This Solution Is Useful   Vote Down This Solution Is Not Useful  

Comments posted for this solution

Love Joy
Love Joy
Reps: 78
I don't think it is fair to have the student change his cultural ways just because others are uncomfortable with his smell. American students should be taught that there are other cultures who find this is normal behavior and that they must deal with it. I think getting control of the class behavior issues will stop a lot of the giggling and jokes on the new student.
  Posted on: June 9, 2013 9:06 pm

Kelly Jackson
Kelly Jackson
Reps: 103
Yes, American students should be made aware of other cultures but these are elementary school children. They do not comprehend that level of understanding. Elementary school children should be taught other cultures but can not be expected to automatically respond to different ways with acceptance. This must be a taught response.
  Posted on: June 9, 2013 10:32 pm

Stormye Brantley
Stormye Brantley
Reps: 121
I suggested a similar solution. I think having a "friendly" class discussion would be helpful. Contacting the parents is also a good idea I considered. The parents may understand the situation and can help their child. They may even be going through a similar situation.
  Posted on: October 24, 2013 7:42 pm

Josh Oglesby
Josh Oglesby
Reps: 69
Getting control of elementary kids is difficult without anything unusual going on. I believe that having a class discussion will only bring the issue more to the forefront and put the student on display for his "issues" more so that y handling it through more private affairs.
  Posted on: June 2, 2014 7:39 pm

Reply Add a Comment
 
     
     
 
Solution 10
Posted February 15, 2013 1:12 am

Mr. Timarcus Wyatt
Mr. Timarcus Wyatt
Reps: 27
The problem is not with the odor in the class. The problem is that the students are allowed to disrespect another student and that is unacceptable. You should intervene and have a discussion with the students about what is going on. You should state your expectations and that there will be zero-tolerance for name calling and poking fun at other students. Students should also understand the importance of making the new student feel comfortable. Also, there should be an opportunity for the new students to share of his experiences in Eastern Europe if he is comfortable with doing so. This will give the other students a different perspective and see that he is a normal child just like them, he just may have a different accent and be from a different place.
Votes: +4 / -0 Vote Up This Solution Is Useful   Vote Down This Solution Is Not Useful  

Comments posted for this solution

Brittany Smith
Brittany Smith
Reps: 69
I definitely agree with you on the students being allowed to make fun of others. This type of behavior should be dealt with immediately. I also think it would be important to try and gain the student's trust and talk with him to see what is going on and if there is a cultural reason for his smell. I also think the parents should be informed of how their son is being treated, but it should be done in a very respectful way that lets the parents know that the teacher has their son's well-being in mind.
  Posted on: June 4, 2013 3:33 pm

yJaGus
yJaGus
Reps: 106
I agree with you completely about setting the ground rules of not allowing the students to make fun of other students. However, I feel like it would embarrass the student if you made it a group discussion. I think if you pulled in how different cultures believe different things, it would help that student know you understand his culture and give him the confidence he needs.
  Posted on: November 2, 2013 6:28 pm

Reply Add a Comment
 
     
     
 
Solution 11
Posted February 15, 2013 10:36 am

Lauren Turner
Lauren Turner
Reps: 26
This is a very touchy subject. Depending on what grade level you are teaching, I would go over a hygiene lesson. Maybe inform the students that taking showers is fun because it makes you feel all clean. You could also add things like making sure you wash your hands all the time to not spread germs and brushing your teeth. Next, I would have the school nurse talk to his parents. Sometimes, it is better for someone other than the teacher to tell parents this kind of information. If not the school nurse, then maybe a guidance counselor. The parents will tend to listen and be open to their ideas a little more than the teacher.
Votes: +4 / -0 Vote Up This Solution Is Useful   Vote Down This Solution Is Not Useful  

Comments posted for this solution

Colleen Keller
Colleen Keller
Reps: 92
.
  Posted on: June 6, 2013 7:48 pm

Emily West
Emily West
Reps: 102
I also think that, depending on grade level, a lesson on health and hygiene would be beneficial for this student. But because he is probably used to his smell he may think that he has an issue. I also agree that going to the school nurse and having him or her meet with you and the parents is a good idea because the parents may be more open to listening to a nurse about the issue.
  Posted on: October 21, 2013 3:11 pm

aBugeS
aBugeS
Reps: 77
I agree it may be beneficial for the teacher to get administration or other party involved. I am also concerned sometimes that when you have a smelly kid, there may be some neglect at home. As a teacher, I am also concerned about the safety and well being of the children in my care. By making the administration involved and having the parents come in for a conference, you can get a better idea of the home life and why the child has an odor.
  Posted on: June 9, 2014 4:02 pm

Chelsea Abbott
Chelsea Abbott
Reps: 112
I agree that this is a touchy subject to approach. Teaching the students about personal hygiene all together would be a great idea. Showing the entire class that taking baths is just one part of taking care about yourself. As a teacher, I would have to make sure that more teasing does not come from this lesson. All students would ultimately benefit from a health lesson.
  Posted on: October 23, 2015 2:15 pm

Reply Add a Comment
 
     
     
 
Solution 12
Posted February 18, 2013 12:48 pm

Katy Willoughby
Katy Willoughby
Reps: 30
I have personally dealt with this type of situation when I was in school. During high school, one of my fellow classmates exhibited the same traits described in the case above. I feel that the best way to deal with this is to send the child to the school nurse or the counselor. Here, they can explain the importance of personal health and cleanliness to the child. If this does not work, the teacher could send home a nice and respectful note with the student. They could also have a parent-teacher conference discussing the situation. The teacher just needs to be sure to not offend the parents and their culture.
Votes: +4 / -0 Vote Up This Solution Is Useful   Vote Down This Solution Is Not Useful  

Comments posted for this solution

yheraZ
yheraZ
Reps: 68
I also think that the school counselor and nurse are valuable resources. I also think that having the class learn about hygiene and how different cultures handle hygiene in their own way is a really good idea as well. In a lot of schools the nurse will actually come to classrooms for presentations and discussions about hygiene and different hygiene products such as deodorant.
  Posted on: June 4, 2013 7:23 pm

Kyle Chambers
Kyle Chambers
Reps: 68
I'm not sure if I would personally send the student to the school nurse or counselor in this situation based on the student's age. The student is only in elementary school and therefore may not fully understand why he or she is being singled out in this situation. If the student was in middle school or high school, I would definitely ask these people to talk to the student.
  Posted on: June 9, 2013 8:59 pm

Reply Add a Comment
 
     
     
 
Solution 13
Posted June 9, 2013 9:22 pm

Monique Cook
Monique Cook
Reps: 70
I think the first thing that you need to do is actually find out if this is a cultural issue. You should not just assume that because he is Eastern European, his body odor is correlated to his culture, because this may or may not be true.It could be an issue of neglect or bad living conditions. If it is a cultural issue, I do not believe you should send a note home to his parents. This is a part of his culture and he may very well think that everyone else smells bad. You should warn him about some of the comments students may make, but you should also conference with the students to let them know that it is not appropriate to tease him because he smells different. There should be consequences if he is bullied just as if he was fat.
Votes: +4 / -0 Vote Up This Solution Is Useful   Vote Down This Solution Is Not Useful  

Comments posted for this solution

Reply Add a Comment
 
     
     
 
Solution 14
Posted November 2, 2013 1:16 pm

upyNuX
upyNuX
Reps: 100
I would start by immediately working to change the behavior of his classmates by talking about bullying as well as having a discussion about different cultures and that just because someone's culture is different from yours does not mean it is wrong. I would talk to them about accepting and understanding other cultures.

I would then have a conference with the parents to let them know what is going on. My intent would be primarily to inform them about what has been going one and what I have done to try to get other students to be more understanding and compassionate. I would not ask them to change their ways but would inform them so that they can make the decision as a family about what to do (change their hygiene habits or maintain their current cultural habits). Throughout this I would keep in mind that the issue might not be cultural but instead could be hormonal or some other such issue.

I would also talk with the school counselor to get her input. This is something that should be addressed schoolwide because he will interact with students from other classrooms on the playground, cafeteria, etc.
Votes: +4 / -0 Vote Up This Solution Is Useful   Vote Down This Solution Is Not Useful  

Comments posted for this solution

raWubu
raWubu
Reps: 97
I agree with this solution. There are many reasons why a student might "stink," it would be best to inform the parents just like the solution said to just let them know the situation. I also love the idea of educating students on bullying and culture.
  Posted on: October 19, 2014 10:11 pm

Jordan Nelms
Jordan Nelms
Reps: 104
Great point on addressing the classmates first! They should understand that no matter what, it is not okay to make fun a child because of their smell. Once the "picking" is under control, it may be easier to address the problem.
  Posted on: October 27, 2014 3:43 am

vasere
vasere
Reps: 70
I think you are right that the other students need to be addressed first. What they are saying is unnecessary and unkind. Approaching the situation this way with the parents is also wise. You are right, they should definitely know what is going on at school and be given the opportunity to respond appropriately. It also will be a respectful way to broach the subject of hygiene with the family.
  Posted on: June 3, 2015 3:11 am

Reply Add a Comment
 
     
     
 
Solution 15
Posted February 13, 2013 10:15 pm

Melissa Sapp
Melissa Sapp
Reps: 29
The first thing to keep in mind is that body odor does not necessarily mean that the family or child in particular does not bathe. Some people sweat more than others causing body odor, also depending on the age of the child they may not have started using deodorant. I might would start with a lesson about cleanliness and bathing and include a portion about the Eastern European traditions in case that is the issue. Letting the students know about differences in cultures may help the teasing. You could also include lessons about bullying and a reminder that it is not tolerated in your class. If the problem still persists then I agree with the other solution that said your school counselor could be a helpful resource in finding other possible solutions to this problem.
Votes: +3 / -0 Vote Up This Solution Is Useful   Vote Down This Solution Is Not Useful  

Comments posted for this solution

yheraZ
yheraZ
Reps: 68
Your solution is very thorough and I completely agree. I think starting with a lesson about hygiene would be a great and also including information about other cultures ways of dealing with hygiene. I also think that having lessons about bullying is a great and helpful intervention in this situation as well.
  Posted on: June 4, 2013 10:38 am

gyjyjy
gyjyjy
Reps: 71
I also think that a lesson on hygiene is the first step that I would take. Thee P.E. teacher at our school usually gives lesson during their health time on such issues. I would mention the problem to the P.E. teacher so she could make sure she covers this during health.
  Posted on: June 9, 2013 7:55 pm

Love Joy
Love Joy
Reps: 78
Both of your suggestions are wonderful. Incorporating the PE teacher as well as discussing hygiene will both help to stop the bullying and disrespect. I also would first make sure the student understood what was happening and that I would take care of it.
  Posted on: June 9, 2013 9:09 pm

TuVuze
TuVuze
Reps: 99
I didnít think about incorporating the help of the P.E. teacher, but this is a great idea as well. In this manner, all students would be addressed and the primary teacher would have a little distance from the issue of hygiene. This type of health lesson would be beneficial to all of the students, not just the new student from Europe.
  Posted on: November 3, 2013 3:12 pm

Haley Moore
Haley Moore
Reps: 31
I really like your solution and think it would be beneficial. I also think that contacting the P.E. teacher would be a great step as well. Our P.E. teacher also teaches health lessons. I think that informing all of the students at one time would help instead of singling the migrant student out. If this solution does not work then contacting the parents would be the next step I would take.
  Posted on: June 5, 2014 5:44 pm

Reply Add a Comment
 
     
     
 
Solution 16
Posted June 5, 2013 6:41 pm

qyzeha
qyzeha
Reps: 105
This is an extremely difficult situation for a teacher to be in. I would speak with the counselor's office and ask them to attend a conference with the parents. I would ask the parents to attend the conference so that you can discuss the issue face to face with them. This way the counselor and you can speak with them about the issue in as positive a manner as possible. I would make sure that the parents understand that the other students are noticing the smell, and you don't want this to become a bullying issue. I think that addressing the issue this way would help the parents understand that you have the child's best interest at heart, and that you are not trying to offend them in any way.
Votes: +3 / -0 Vote Up This Solution Is Useful   Vote Down This Solution Is Not Useful  

Comments posted for this solution

Hope Crosby
Hope Crosby
Reps: 122
You and I have very similar opinions. I thought that the counselor's involvement would also help ease the tension in this situation as well. In addition, your idea about a parent conference is exactly what I see fit. As always, we want the parents to know that we have their child's best interest at heart!
  Posted on: October 27, 2013 4:54 pm

Jessica Briley
Jessica Briley
Reps: 109
I think this is a great idea! I suggested bringing in the school nurse to have him/her explain the importance of hygiene and health in a close knit classroom. I think bringing in the counselor to perhaps be a mediator and positive speaker would help greatly!
  Posted on: October 30, 2013 2:44 pm

Kristen Eason
Kristen Eason
Reps: 57
I agree, I believe having the support from the school counselor and nurse will help resolve some of this issue. It can also benefit several of the other students if the counselor did an entire lesson for the whole class. You can never know too much about having good hygiene habits.
  Posted on: June 2, 2014 3:55 pm

Jennifer Loncon
Jennifer Loncon
Reps: 68
I think a face to face conference is the best route, but I think the including the school counselor is an even better idea! They may be able to bring ideas from a different stand point and make the parents feel that this is only an effort to help and not over step.
  Posted on: June 6, 2014 2:15 am

Qureby
Qureby
Reps: 102
My solution involved a face to face meeting with the parents but I did not think to include the school counselor. I think having the counselor there would be extremely helpful as they have been trained to handle delicate situations such as this one.
  Posted on: November 2, 2014 7:29 pm

uzyXuV
uzyXuV
Reps: 208
I would include all resources that were available to me. The school nurse, the guidance counselor, the parents and any mini lessons on hygiene that I could incorporate into the curriculum.
  Posted on: October 15, 2015 1:55 am

Reply Add a Comment
 
     
     
 
Solution 17
Posted June 9, 2013 8:53 pm

Kyle Chambers
Kyle Chambers
Reps: 68
The first thing I would do is to set up a meeting between the parents and myself. I would ask someone from the adminstration to be there as well. The most important thing in this situation is to be respectful and show the parents that you are trying to help their student. I would also ask the school nurse or administration how they have handled this situation in the past. I feel like as long as the teacher is being respectful and has the right motives in mind, then that is all he or she can do. That message must come across while meeting with the parents.
Votes: +3 / -0 Vote Up This Solution Is Useful   Vote Down This Solution Is Not Useful  

Comments posted for this solution

Megan Teague
Megan Teague
Reps: 55
Great idea about getting the administration involved. A teacher would never want to go into such a touchy situation alone. You are right, respect is the key here and it needs to happen in a respectful way. The teacher needs to make sure why the child is coming to school like that. It might be a cultural thing, but it could also be that he doesnít have the means to smell better.
  Posted on: June 6, 2014 8:04 pm

aBugeS
aBugeS
Reps: 77
Your solution is very similar to mine. I personally would not approach the child directly with this because I do not want the child to feel singled out and feel as though you are agreeing with the students that are picking on them. It is important for the teacher to discuss the hygiene of a child with the parents. The school may also decide to offer up solution for the parents and the nurse can help to teach the parents and the child about personal hygiene.
  Posted on: June 9, 2014 4:09 pm

Reply Add a Comment
 
     
     
 
Solution 18
Posted June 9, 2013 9:02 pm

Love Joy
Love Joy
Reps: 78
First of all, you can't make someone change cultural ways. So, incorporating the family in making the student transform to the American ways is not ethical. I would begin by eliminating the behavior issues first in class. I would explain that rudeness will not be tolerated and neither will disrespect. I would then have a lesson to discuss cultures, self-esteem, self-concept and personalities. This way the students will understand how everyone feels about themselves is just as important as how they feel about themselves. We would then begin to discuss culture and rituals. This could lead into a research project and a trip to the media center in order for each student to learn a new culture and rituals. Then presenting them to the class will allow each student to let classmates understand that everyone is different. I would allow the new student to research another culture and not his own. Each student would then have to compare his culture to the culture that was researched. Comparing and contrasting each will help them to see there are differences.
Votes: +3 / -0 Vote Up This Solution Is Useful   Vote Down This Solution Is Not Useful  

Comments posted for this solution

Kimberly Spicer
Kimberly Spicer
Reps: 71
I couldn't agree more!! This is definitely not ethical for the teacher to propose the family change their way of living...especially for the child. It was probably hard enough for the student to leave his home and friends and come to a completely different culture. He probably thinks some of the other students smell bad. (And honestly, some adults smell bad from all the perfume and cologne they wear.) Assessing the behaviors of the other students teasing him is the best solution to start with. I would definitely do this privately with each individual student.
  Posted on: June 9, 2013 10:08 pm

upyNuX
upyNuX
Reps: 100
I don't think it is unethical to let them know what is going on. I would not tell them they "must" change their ways, but would just let them know what is going on so that they can make an informed decision. If they then decide to continue with their cultural ways, that is fine. I would let them know that I have/will talk with the class about their reactions and behaviors. But the fact is this is something the Eastern European family will have to deal with outside of the classroom as well.

If nothing else, I think the parents at least deserve to know what the class's initial reaction was and how you have dealt with it and ask them for their input to see if there is anything further they would like you to do.
  Posted on: November 2, 2013 1:09 pm

Chelsea Abbott
Chelsea Abbott
Reps: 112
I do agree with you that students cannot change their ethical ways. I do not think that by giving the student a lesson on personal hygiene will change their culture ways. The advice that I give to the student does not mean that they "must" change their appearance or daily ritual. I do agree that the students should not execute inappropriate behavior. Teaching the students about different cultures would be a great idea in general.
  Posted on: October 23, 2015 2:17 pm

Reply Add a Comment
 
     
     
 
Solution 19
Posted October 27, 2013 1:31 pm

BazuTy
BazuTy
Reps: 116
I would seek additional assistance from the school nurse and counselor. I also would include the parents in a meeting about the issue. If the parents do not want to change the situation, the counselor and nurse should address the students in the classroom.
Votes: +3 / -0 Vote Up This Solution Is Useful   Vote Down This Solution Is Not Useful  

Comments posted for this solution

udydyV
udydyV
Reps: 108
I would also include the school nurse and the counselor. The nurse could provide information on the health concerns relating to the child's hygiene. This way if future problems develop with the child, the parents cannot say they were not informed of the risks of not having their son take a shower. Especially since liability always fall on the school system.
  Posted on: November 3, 2013 12:52 pm

TuVuze
TuVuze
Reps: 99
I think that involving school personnel such as the school nurse and counselor are good ideas as well. As a concerted effort, all partiesóthe teacher, parents, school nurse, and counselor could come up with a solution to the dilemma. The nurse could give her opinions from a medical standpoint, while the counselor could share information that would encourage maintaining good psychological health for the student. The goal is for the student to excel at school, so it would be best if everyone involved kept the studentís best possible outcome in mind.
  Posted on: November 3, 2013 3:07 pm

Reply Add a Comment
 
     
     
 
Solution 20
Posted October 27, 2013 4:52 pm

Hope Crosby
Hope Crosby
Reps: 122
I would first speak with the school guidance counselor about the situation. I have sent several students to the nurse before for body odor and she provides them with deodorant and speaks to them about hygiene, but sense this case might be more culturally sensitive, I would ask the counselorís opinion about what we could do. Afterward, I would possibly phone the parents or arrange a meeting and explain the situation. I would try to make the parents understand that we are not trying to change their beliefs, but that we are worried about their child and do not wish to have him teased/picked on.

As always, any students who do pick/tease will be reprimanded according to school guidelines. I also might have them see the guidance counselor for a session on cultural differences.
Votes: +3 / -0 Vote Up This Solution Is Useful   Vote Down This Solution Is Not Useful  

Comments posted for this solution

Jordyn Nail
Jordyn Nail
Reps: 108
Putting the situation in the counselor's hands is probably best. The student has much less contact with the counselor and wont see him/her everyday and be reminded of the embarrassment. Also, counselors are more trained to handle uncomfortable situations.
  Posted on: November 1, 2013 10:38 am

Nick Hanna
Nick Hanna
Reps: 71
The counselors at schools are rarely used in the magnitude that they should be and this is a great example of when they should be called in for help. When dealing with a sensative situation like this, counselors will be able to have the conversations on culture and hygene without it being awkwards for the teacher/student relationship.
  Posted on: June 5, 2014 4:07 am

Reply Add a Comment
 
     
     
 
Solution 21
Posted November 2, 2013 6:24 pm

yJaGus
yJaGus
Reps: 106
The best possible way to handle this situation (although there is no easy way) is to have a parent conference with the whole family. It may be a cultural or it may be some other reason. As a parent it would make me feel better if you spoke to me about the situation than to know that my child was being made fun of. Another way is to explore European culture as a class study and talk about the different things of the culture. However, I think the worse thing to do would be to let it go unnoticed and have the bullying continue.
Votes: +3 / -0 Vote Up This Solution Is Useful   Vote Down This Solution Is Not Useful  

Comments posted for this solution

yraGaD
yraGaD
Reps: 28
I agree that speaking to the parents is a better option. Doing research on the European culture could help the students gain an understanding of the similarities and differences in our cultures.
  Posted on: November 3, 2013 7:28 pm

Reply Add a Comment
 
     
     
 
Solution 22
Posted November 3, 2013 2:58 pm

TuVuze
TuVuze
Reps: 99
First of all, you should address the students who are making fun of the new student from Europe. Even if the new student does have a body odor, it is not acceptable for other students to make fun of him. Your students should be made aware of their improper behavior. In regards to addressing the body odor issue, you should partner and consult with the school counselor and the school nurse to formulate a solution to the problem. I think that the use of school support personnel could really help you with this dilemma by providing you with a measure of detachment from the issue so that the student does not feel as if you are siding with the students that are making fun of him.

Many times, school counselors have experience dealing with these types of issues. Additionally, you could contact the studentís parents by phone and discuss the issues that are occurring at school. You will want to make sure that you are speaking from the standpoint that you have their childís best interest at the forefront. This may help to ease the discomfort in speaking about the subject matter for both parties. Perhaps after you speak with the studentís parents, the school nurse could present a hygiene lesson to your class and the counselor could discuss with your class how cultures differ and that each society does not ascribe to the same practices.
Votes: +3 / -0 Vote Up This Solution Is Useful   Vote Down This Solution Is Not Useful  

Comments posted for this solution

Reply Add a Comment
 
     
     
 
Solution 23
Posted June 2, 2014 7:35 pm

Josh Oglesby
Josh Oglesby
Reps: 69
Although the intent may be to not appear disrespectful of the parents culture, I believe a larger disservice may be done to the student if you sit by silently and allow him to be picked on by fellow students. From the eyes of the child, he may not understand why he is being picked on unless he is educated on the fact. A solution may be to call together the parents and student for a meeting in which you can discuss the "problem" and voice your feelings about not wanting to step on the toes of their culture. From here, enlighten them to the culture that they and their student exist in now and how BO is taken. Do not approach it as a problem to be solved but more as an information session as to why their child is being treated the way he is. As parents, they will be the ones who will have to make the choice as to embrace the new culture with their child or not.
Votes: +3 / -0 Vote Up This Solution Is Useful   Vote Down This Solution Is Not Useful  

Comments posted for this solution

Michael Herndon
Michael Herndon
Reps: 68
Josh, I like the way you framed the parent meeting as an information session and not necessarily meeting to fix a problem. I think it is important for the parents to understand the culture in which they are currently living and let them decide on what to do about showers.
  Posted on: June 3, 2014 9:39 pm

Meagan Cook
Meagan Cook
Reps: 53
I appreciate your approach. I would also bring forth a solution to the comments from the other students so the child is more comfortable in class as well.
  Posted on: June 4, 2015 11:12 pm

Melissa Aspinwall
Melissa Aspinwall
Reps: 79
I agree with you that sitting silently and not addressing the problem would be a huge disservice for all involved. I also feel the other students inappropriate comments need to be dealt with as well.
  Posted on: June 7, 2015 5:15 am

Qybuse
Qybuse
Reps: 118
I think you offer a great solution. I especially like how you are not presenting the situation to the parents like it is a problem that needs to be fixed. This is, after all, their culture and the way that they have lived for many years. It's not an issue of cleanliness or germs to them; in fact, they're probably relatively healthy people. It is something that might need to be discussed though, just to keep the parents informed about how their child is being treated and to let them know what you're doing in the classroom to address those issues. I think open communication and dialogue are key to any parent-teacher relationship, but especially in a case like this where this family is new to the culture and they're trusting you to take care of their child.
  Posted on: November 2, 2015 1:33 am

Reply Add a Comment
 
     
     
 
Solution 24
Posted June 5, 2014 4:47 pm

Cardia Foster
Cardia Foster
Reps: 73
I would schedule a conference with the parents and also have the counselor present. I would take this route, because this is bullying, which is a serious issue. I would also teach a lesson about being nice to others. This will help get the point across without calling any names. This is an issue that needs to be thoughtfully planned and handled quickly.
Votes: +3 / -0 Vote Up This Solution Is Useful   Vote Down This Solution Is Not Useful  

Comments posted for this solution

Tiffany Parker
Tiffany Parker
Reps: 69
Good ideas! I really think the conference, with counselor present, would really help the situation. This would also be a great time to discuss multicultural differences with the class!
  Posted on: June 7, 2014 2:36 pm

LeeAnna Elder
LeeAnna Elder
Reps: 75
I agree with regular communication with the child's parents. The one thing I have found out that will make a parent madder than fire and reluctant to see your point of view, and assist you with a problem or concern about their child, is the lack of communication. I also agree that the other students need to be educated about bullying and the serious implications on the bully and the victim.
  Posted on: June 13, 2014 5:32 pm

Reply Add a Comment
 
     
     
 
Solution 25
Posted June 13, 2014 3:42 am

Alicia Garcia
Alicia Garcia
Reps: 69
Since the student is a different gender then me I would try to find a male teacher or counselor to discuss the body odor issue with him in private. He needs someone to talk with honestly about this situation and explain the differences in custom between cultures. I think pubescent teenagers are already shy and awkward enough. Anything we as teachers can do to mitigate these feelings is important to consider. For example, I have had students come and ask me about feminine hygiene because they needed someone to talk with or provide them with items. Most would be mortified if they had to discuss this with a male teacher. Some things are just easier to talk about with someone of the same gender regardless of culture.
I have never had an immigrant student who smelled bad in the past but I have had students who had odor issues for other reasons. Speaking to them as a concerned person with their best interest at heart can go a long way. When the student was male there was another male teacher I worked with who was decent and well respected by the students. He generally spoke to the young men and I spoke to the young women. This may be a cultural issue but it may not be. It may be an issue with access to resources like a washing machine. Many immigrants who come to the United States initially stay with family (Spring, 2008) and he may be temporarily living in cramped conditions that are not ideal. The fact that his father is a professor certainly does not necessarily mean the family has a great deal of financial resources so this is not beyond the scope of possibility. Some adjunct professors make as little as $20,000 and year and it can be difficult to support an entire family on this salary right after a move.
While this situation does need to be broached delicately and with a lens of cultural sensitivity it does need to be broached. Once someone has spoken with the young man and you have an idea what is going on I would call the parents. You should be able to work with them to find a solution to help your student.
Votes: +3 / -0 Vote Up This Solution Is Useful   Vote Down This Solution Is Not Useful  

Comments posted for this solution

James Moran
James Moran
Reps: 62
I didn't consider the gender of the student. That is a good point to make. Certainly, it is a much easier and more effective conversation when the teacher and the student are of the same gender. I also agree that the issue can be tied up with socio-economic issues as well. Teachers need to be sensitive of both cultural and economic issues when it comes to body odor.
  Posted on: June 15, 2014 3:19 pm

Reply Add a Comment
 
     
     
 
Solution 26
Posted March 16, 2015 1:19 am

atuTyL
atuTyL
Reps: 120
I would tell the parents, but I would also provide the student with some hygiene items to ensure that he did not smell. Bullying is a big issue and I wouldn't want the outcome to be negative.
Votes: +3 / -0 Vote Up This Solution Is Useful   Vote Down This Solution Is Not Useful  

Comments posted for this solution

Reply Add a Comment
 
     
     
 
Solution 27
Posted June 3, 2015 3:50 pm

ReMuXy
ReMuXy
Reps: 78
I think I would make a counselor referral and let them deal with this issue. I would be concerned that the child is not taking care of at home due to the hygiene issue. Moreover, I would monitor the students to make sure they are not making fun of him. Students making fun of other students is a real bullying problem so I may even consider calling his parents in for a conference just to go over what has happened. This is a real tough issue.
Votes: +3 / -0 Vote Up This Solution Is Useful   Vote Down This Solution Is Not Useful  

Comments posted for this solution

Reply Add a Comment
 
     
     
 
Solution 28
Posted December 5, 2012 9:00 pm

Savanna Hayman
Savanna Hayman
Reps: 104
I think that by moving to such a different environment, parents expect some different cultural norms. I don't think that it would be disrespectful to send a note home to his parents, especially when you make it clear that you are only looking out for their son and do not want him to feel uncomfortable at school. I think that they will put their son first and be thankful that you took initiative.
Votes: +2 / -0 Vote Up This Solution Is Useful   Vote Down This Solution Is Not Useful  

Comments posted for this solution

L. Carrell
L. Carrell
Reps: 63
I agree that the parents are likely to understand the situation. Being in a new culture will require some adjustments and hopefully the parents would be thankful that the teacher brought this to their attention.
  Posted on: June 9, 2013 9:17 pm

Reply Add a Comment
 
     
     
 
Solution 29
Posted December 5, 2012 10:11 pm

Jill Graff
Jill Graff
Reps: 104
Sometimes I find the nurse is a great resource for this type of intervention. Yes, there are cultural differences, but sometimes getting information from someone who isn't teaching the child goes over better with the child. This way the student will never know who said what or be mad at you or other kids in the classroom. Hopefully the smell clears up and things will start to go back to normal.
Votes: +2 / -0 Vote Up This Solution Is Useful   Vote Down This Solution Is Not Useful  

Comments posted for this solution

Heidi Landon
Heidi Landon
Reps: 58
Using others in the school is a great idea. If the teacher address the issue it may be found as disrespectful but by using other staff members such as the nurse to help with this odor issue is a good starting point if you are worried about upsetting the parents or the student.
  Posted on: June 4, 2013 1:40 am

yVyLyG
yVyLyG
Reps: 69
This solution is great, should a teacher decide they have no other remedies or other alternatives have failed. It minimizes the discomfort and embarrassment for the student by having the talk with an adult who they do not interact with daily and who specializes in the field of health.
  Posted on: June 9, 2013 7:23 pm

gyjyjy
gyjyjy
Reps: 71
I think that you made a good point about having someone besides the teacher teaching the student such as the nurse address the issue, so student want feel awkward or angry with his teacher. At my school our P.E. teacher is generally helpful in providing hygiene lessons, so you may see if it can be fit in during a health lesson.
  Posted on: June 9, 2013 7:59 pm

Love Joy
Love Joy
Reps: 78
I have had the school counselor come to our class to talk about hygiene and it has helped tremendously. School counselors are trained professional to handle this type of situation without hurting students' feelings.
  Posted on: June 9, 2013 9:04 pm

upyNuX
upyNuX
Reps: 100
I really like that idea! I thought about involving the counselor but didn't think about the school nurse. Maybe because I teach high school where there isn't a school nurse! But I do think the school nurse should be able to have a conversation with the student/family to let them know what is going on and why it is an issue.
  Posted on: November 2, 2013 1:18 pm

A Battles
A Battles
Reps: 115
I also think the Nurse would be a good option.
  Posted on: November 3, 2013 3:01 pm

Reply Add a Comment
 
     
     
 
Solution 30
Posted December 6, 2012 9:08 pm

Melissa Tolbert
Melissa Tolbert
Reps: 104
One great resource in your school to discuss this with could also be the school counselor. If you know the students' background and where they came from you could do some research as to what their views on this form of hygiene are. I personally think that it would be best to call the parents and discuss the situation and have a conversation about why it came to your attention and what both the family and teacher could to about the situation. Together you could come up with a route to take for this student to feel better in the classroom whether it is deodorant or some other alternative plan.
Votes: +2 / -0 Vote Up This Solution Is Useful   Vote Down This Solution Is Not Useful  

Comments posted for this solution

Erin Ashurst
Erin Ashurst
Reps: 73
I think this is a great suggestion. School counselors are a get resource for immigrant children, and in this situation delicacy is a must. Perhaps consulting the health teacher would be helpful as well since they teach students about hygiene.
  Posted on: June 9, 2013 9:23 pm

TeTugu
TeTugu
Reps: 21
I agree that the school counselor would be a great source to discuss the situation. Within our school, the school counselor is also the person who helps students transitioning into our school as an immigrant or ESOL student. The counselor may already have a good rapport with the student and parents including him/her in the conversation could be beneficial.
  Posted on: November 3, 2013 12:47 pm

Reply Add a Comment
 
     
     
 
Solution 31
Posted December 8, 2012 8:53 am

Ariane Anderson
Ariane Anderson
Reps: 113
First, I would set up a teacher conference with the student parents. Initially the conference will pertain to the studentís progress in class and how he is adjusting. I will give the parents the opportunity to ask questions and add any additional comments. I will inform them of how he is a wonderful child, how he tries to participate in class activities, and how he tries to make friends with others in the classroom. Then I would mention for a couple of days I have noticed he has an odor and the other students are teasing him about the odor. I am addressing this situation o prevent any additional teasing in the future.
Votes: +1 / -0 Vote Up This Solution Is Useful   Vote Down This Solution Is Not Useful  

Comments posted for this solution

Stephanie Harmon
Stephanie Harmon
Reps: 84
I agree that a parent teacher conference is probably the best way to initiate the conversation. It can be extremely sensitive and insulting to parents if an issues that is as personal as this is addressed via written note or email. I think that sensitivity can be best preserved in a face to face meeting and discussion.
  Posted on: June 4, 2013 4:03 pm

Emily West
Emily West
Reps: 102
i think that having a conference about the student in general (academic progress, adjusting to new school, etc) and incorporating the body odor issue is a great idea. I think it is also a good idea to tell them that you have noticed the odor and so have other students and you have addressed the issue with the other students. This will insure them that he is not being bullied at this point. Hopefully then the parents will take the next steps to preventing the smell.

  Posted on: October 21, 2013 3:17 pm

Reply Add a Comment
 
     
     
 
Solution 32
Posted December 8, 2012 1:26 pm

Booker Hobbs
Booker Hobbs
Reps: 56
This is a real sensitive issue. Careful steps or approaches must be taken here. Any disqualifying statements will end all conversation. I will inform the school's counselor so that she or he can meet with him. If the problem continues, I will set up another meeting with the counselor, parent and child. Also I will tell my students that this is not a laughing matter because many cultures are different and the child is not at fault. However, I will explain to his parents about the situation in the classroom that could lead to the child's discomfort.
Votes: +1 / -0 Vote Up This Solution Is Useful   Vote Down This Solution Is Not Useful  

Comments posted for this solution

Colleen Keller
Colleen Keller
Reps: 92
I completely agree that this is a sensitive subject and that the steps taken should be very careful. I like that you would talk to the counselor first to talk about a solution. I think it is very important to talk with the other student to make sure they understand that this is not a laughing matter and that they need to be sensitive to others.
  Posted on: June 6, 2013 7:58 pm

Reply Add a Comment
 
     
     
 
Solution 33
Posted June 4, 2013 10:46 am

yheraZ
yheraZ
Reps: 68
This is a tough situation for a teacher to deal with, novice or experienced. I was at a loss about how to handle a situation like this until I read through some of the other solutions. I feel like the best way to address this should being in the classroom weather you teach the lesson or the school nurse depending on what your school generally does, but I would begin with a classroom lesson dealing with hygiene and including how some other cultures have different hygiene habits. Some children this age are also undergoing body changes that require they start wearing deodorant and this may be a new idea for some of the students so this should also be included in the lesson as well. I also thing a good idea for a follow up to this lesson would be discussing bullying with your students, explain to students that bullying can take the form of name calling, teasing and isolating others and that you wonít allow it in you classroom . I do think that you should be as culturally sensitive as possible in the situation as to not offend the child or his parents so I think starting to address the issues in the way I previously stated is a good starting point and I believe it will help you. If you have doubts about what course of action to pursue consulting with your school counselor and nurse are always good ideas.
Votes: +1 / -0 Vote Up This Solution Is Useful   Vote Down This Solution Is Not Useful  

Comments posted for this solution

Stephanie Harmon
Stephanie Harmon
Reps: 84
I like the idea of having the school nurse come into the classroom to teach a lesson on hygiene. You are right that there are likely other students in the classroom who are beginning to undergo the hormonal changes that need deodorant and I think that the school nurse would likely know the best way to discuss this with the students.
  Posted on: June 4, 2013 4:06 pm

Reply Add a Comment
 
     
     
 
Solution 34
Posted June 4, 2013 3:12 pm

Brittany Smith
Brittany Smith
Reps: 69
In this situation, I think you would need to respectfully talk to the parents. Inform them of how their son is being treated because of his odor. Talk to them in a way that shows cultural respect and with only their son's best intentions in mind. I think you should also inform the class of the importance of hygiene and cleanliness. Address how being clean affects health and prevents diseases, but I would do this in a way that does not single this student out. I think that these are the best ways to approach this situation. By teaching the student the importance of cleanliness, you are showing him the cultural norm and his need to be clean, and by informing the parents of this need, you are hopefully reinforcing this behavior through parental intervention.
Votes: +1 / -0 Vote Up This Solution Is Useful   Vote Down This Solution Is Not Useful  

Comments posted for this solution

yZaveh
yZaveh
Reps: 109
You made a great point that this could also be used as an opportunity to teach the whole class about hygiene and cleanliness- something that students that age definitely need as their bodies begin to change as they grow.
  Posted on: October 30, 2013 4:32 pm

Meredith Bryant
Meredith Bryant
Reps: 106
Parental involvement is always key in any "touchy" situation. First, find out the initial cause of the odor--is it really based on their culture? Ask the parents what you can do as a teacher to help, but also convey your concern for the child in terms of their social environment. If you can allow the parents to see your concern, I'm sure they would be much more open and accepting of your comments about the odor.
  Posted on: November 3, 2013 3:41 pm

Megan Teague
Megan Teague
Reps: 55
I agree that talking to his parents would be a good idea. I would also agree with teaching the class about staying clean, but I wonder how you would teach that without making it obvious as to whyÖsuggestions?
  Posted on: June 16, 2014 3:59 am

Alyssa Wright
Alyssa Wright
Reps: 69
I like that you brought of the point of discussing the health benefits of bathing regularly. I think this is a great way to teach about the importance of bathing without them feeling like you are telling them what to do.
  Posted on: June 6, 2015 4:56 am

Reply Add a Comment
 
     
     
 
Solution 35
Posted June 5, 2013 10:02 am

Emilee Roberts
Emilee Roberts
Reps: 69
I think that you should do some research about this culture before you approach the parents. Determine the types of foods they eat, hygine rituals and other important aspects of this culture. I think that children can be cruel. I also know that this could potentially be a difficult conversation; however, I beleive that the outcome would be more harmful if this situation went untreated. By discussing these sensitive issues with the parents, you could prevent more bullying and hurtful situations in the future.
Votes: +1 / -0 Vote Up This Solution Is Useful   Vote Down This Solution Is Not Useful  

Comments posted for this solution

VyQaqu
VyQaqu
Reps: 71
This sounds interesting. The teacher might get the necessary information about the cultural aspects of showering and be able to address the situation from a different point of view. Educators do need to make sure that for the sake of all stakeholders, they need to make sure that they are respectful, sensitive, and understanding of the students situations.
  Posted on: June 7, 2013 8:19 pm

eDaNep
eDaNep
Reps: 66
Considering the types of food the student might eat could be a reason for the smell. Helping the student understand why the other kids are being cruel is also important.
  Posted on: June 9, 2013 2:13 pm

Nick Thrower
Nick Thrower
Reps: 67
I haven't thought of that! Conducting a bit of research before entering a meeting could be helpful! It would tell you if you needed to simply state the facts, or ease your way into it.
  Posted on: June 13, 2014 3:17 pm

Reply Add a Comment
 
     
     
 
Solution 36
Posted June 5, 2013 11:01 am

Johnnie Skelton
Johnnie Skelton
Reps: 104
I think that the real issue here is not the studentís body odor but the other studentsí reactions. As other comments have mentioned, the student may not have full control over his hygiene. The students do, however, have control over their responses to others. If there was a student who was being teased for being overweight or for acting effeminately, we would not even consider scheduling a conference to tell the parents that they needed to address their childís eating habits or gender orientation. While hygiene and health issues are important and should be addressed, it sounds as though the odor is not indicative of neglect, only cultural differences. Perhaps the schoolís counselor could help by scheduling a group discussion about cultural differences, but the issue of bullying definitely needs to be addressed.
Votes: +1 / -0 Vote Up This Solution Is Useful   Vote Down This Solution Is Not Useful  

Comments posted for this solution

qyzeha
qyzeha
Reps: 105
I think that having the counselor speak with the other students about cultural differences is a great idea. You do not want to embarrass the student in any way by singling him or his culture out. If the counselor gave an overview of differences in many different cultures then hopefully it would help the other students understand, and encourage them to change their behavior to the new student.
  Posted on: June 5, 2013 6:45 pm

eDaNep
eDaNep
Reps: 66
You make a great point by saying that the smell was not due to neglect. It is important that as teachers we are aware of what is going on with our students and being able to identify the differences between neglect and cultural differences in this case is important.
  Posted on: June 9, 2013 2:18 pm

Reply Add a Comment
 
     
     
 
Solution 37
Posted June 6, 2013 12:13 am

Carol Whitfield
Carol Whitfield
Reps: 56
I would contact the parents. I think the best thing for the teacher to do is eliminate the teasing in his or her classroom and then contact parents. It sucks how American culture is, but at the end of the day, you wouldn't want one of your students to suffer because they are being teased. Contacting the parents and showing sincere concern are the attributes of an effective teacher. I would even ask administration for advice.
Votes: +1 / -0 Vote Up This Solution Is Useful   Vote Down This Solution Is Not Useful  

Comments posted for this solution

PyveDu
PyveDu
Reps: 101
I agree with promoting a safe environment for all of our students. It is very sad how cruel children can be and you would hate that one of your students come to school with fear or anxiety because of other children in the classroom. Having and maintaining that open communication with all parents allow for a smooth and supportive year.
  Posted on: October 19, 2014 2:45 pm

Reply Add a Comment
 
     
     
 
Solution 38
Posted June 6, 2013 1:57 pm

vezaMu
vezaMu
Reps: 85
I think that for this situation it is important to communicate with the parents and the student. I would not send a note home because it could be misinterpreted or appear disrespectful. I think that a phone or in-person conversation would be the best way to approach the parents so that the topic can be discussed delicately. Another person mentioned that it is important to focus the conversation around the childís well-being and feelings, and I agree 100%. I donít know that talking with the class would be helpful to stop the teasing because body odor is something that Americans react to very strongly. It is also important for this child to learn that body odor can have very negative repercussions, for example in the workplace, here in the US. On the other hand, it could be interesting to have a discussion/lesson in class about how various topics, such as hygiene and cleanliness, food, greetings, vary among many cultures. Maybe students could do some internet research on a number of topics and present their findings to the class. This would help broaden the relatively-homogeneous classí ideas about how things are different in other cultures.
Votes: +1 / -0 Vote Up This Solution Is Useful   Vote Down This Solution Is Not Useful  

Comments posted for this solution

L. Carrell
L. Carrell
Reps: 63
I also think that it is much better to talk with the parents about this issue instead of sending a note home. This would require a conversation, not a one-ended letter that the parents read. I am sure the parents would probably have questions about how their child was getting picked on. Then during this conversation the parent can switch gears and talk about how good their child is doing in other areas like other people's solutions have suggested.
  Posted on: June 9, 2013 9:22 pm

Monique Cook
Monique Cook
Reps: 70
I agree that the conversation surrounding this topic should be totally centered around the student's feelings and ability to succeed. Having a bad body odor will not be a problem only in elementary school, he will have to deal with it for the rest of his life.
  Posted on: June 9, 2013 9:26 pm

yJaGus
yJaGus
Reps: 106
I totally agree about complete conversation with the parents. It's also a good point about focusing on the child's well being in the classroom. That is the most important thing for us as teachers to communicate with parents is we are there to make sure the students have the most successful year they can.
  Posted on: November 2, 2013 6:30 pm

Reply Add a Comment
 
     
     
 
Solution 39
Posted June 7, 2013 8:16 pm

VyQaqu
VyQaqu
Reps: 71
The teacher should set up a meeting with the studentís guidance counselor and/or grade level administrator and the parents of the student. The student is in elementary school so I would be careful about discussing this sensitive topic with him without his parents being aware of the situation. In the meeting, the teacher and school staff need to communicate with the parents that their child is experiencing some difficulties with the students in the class and honestly explain what the situation the body odor. I do know that the school staff does not need to be judgmental or accusatory and make sure that the parents clearly understand the situation. I would also consider having a discussion with the class about tolerance and respect. The students in the class need to understand that they do not have a right to make fun of any students for any reason.
Votes: +1 / -0 Vote Up This Solution Is Useful   Vote Down This Solution Is Not Useful  

Comments posted for this solution

Kelly Jackson
Kelly Jackson
Reps: 103
Tolerance and respect is a large part of this issue. Students need to understand one another and a conference with the parents is very important too. I agree that the parents need to know what is going on in the classroom and should be aware of the situation in case they see any changes in the students behavior that could be related to depression.
  Posted on: June 9, 2013 10:29 pm

Reply Add a Comment
 
     
     
 
Solution 40
Posted June 9, 2013 7:14 pm

yVyLyG
yVyLyG
Reps: 69
I do not feel that discussing the issue with the parents or the child is appropriate at this time. I would instead address the issues involving how and why the other children feel it is appropriate to make fun of the student. After addressing the students in the classroom, I would then monitor the affected student's behaviors and performance, to see if he is experiencing any social, emotional, or academic issues that would garner appropriate actions. If that is the case, I would then conference with the parents. However, at no point would I even attempt to recommend they make any changes to his body odor. His scent could come form any number of things, including incense from religion or certain spices being sweat through the skin. As long as the parents have been made aware of the situation, they can then choose how to address the child about the issue, if they even decide to do so.
Votes: +1 / -0 Vote Up This Solution Is Useful   Vote Down This Solution Is Not Useful  

Comments posted for this solution

Kyle Chambers
Kyle Chambers
Reps: 68
Overall, I agree with your statement that the teacher should not approach this issue by asking the student to change his or her body odor. However, I feel like the parents should be made aware of the situation and should handle it internally. I like your idea about talking to the students about making fun of other students and the affects that could come from their actions.
  Posted on: June 9, 2013 8:55 pm

Kimberly Spicer
Kimberly Spicer
Reps: 71
I agree with you that the parents should not be contacted as a first attempt. I would watch to see whom in particular was teasing the child and then address those students individually. Explaining to them that when we go to another culture, there are some things that are going to be different. Great solution!
  Posted on: June 9, 2013 9:49 pm

aBugeS
aBugeS
Reps: 77
It is really important for the parents to know. They need to aware because the child maybe being bullied at school. Allow the parents to correct the issue at home if it needs to be corrected.
  Posted on: June 9, 2014 3:58 pm

Reply Add a Comment
 
     
     
 
Solution 41
Posted October 24, 2013 7:36 pm

Stormye Brantley
Stormye Brantley
Reps: 121
I would first consult the school counselor or ESOL teacher and ask for advice. After the consultation, I would suggest nonchalantly mentioning a few hygiene tips-- washing hands after using the bathroom, wearing deodorant, using hand sanitizer, etc. I would also encourage it in the classroom. Perhaps if it were discussed in a non-judgmental, caring setting, the European student would not feel embarrassed and would learn about American culture. These conversations may in turn remind the students why Americans bathe daily.
Votes: +1 / -0 Vote Up This Solution Is Useful   Vote Down This Solution Is Not Useful  

Comments posted for this solution

jaMyDu
jaMyDu
Reps: 119
That is a great suggestion about talking with the ESOL teacher. I also think teaching personal hygiene to the entire class is a good idea. This would teach the student the American norms. You could also incorporate dental hygiene and give out samples of all of the products.
  Posted on: November 3, 2013 5:49 pm

yteduM
yteduM
Reps: 77
I really like the idea of talking to the ESOL counselor. She might have a better way of handling this issue. I think it is a great idea also to talk to the class about good hygiene. That way the student can become familiar with the American culture to bath daily and use deodorant.
  Posted on: June 5, 2015 3:51 pm

Reply Add a Comment
 
     
     
 
Solution 42
Posted October 25, 2013 1:52 pm

Tracy C
Tracy C
Reps: 104
It sounds as though, Igoa's (1995) CAP system of intervention is required. That is, a cultural intervention is needed. First, I would suggest that the teacher engage the student in a one-on-one conversation to find out the facts regarding the student's culture regarding taking showers everyday. The teacher can do this in a non-offensive way; her/his goal is simply to communicate with the student to learn about various aspects of his culture. Next, if the teacher does not feel as though she does not have a personal relationship with the student to the extent that they can talk one-on-one, I would suggest that the teacher involve the parents through a parent conference to address the matter. I would even add that the teacher seeks the support of the nurse during the conference to help the parents understand that the issue is not a cultural one, but more of a health concern for the student (as well as the class). While it is important to respect and tolerate the culture of others, we have to also take measures to ensure that the learning environment is a safe place for all students. Also, during the parent conference, the teacher needs to communicate to the parents the other students' reactions and how it may affect their son, as well as how the odor may be a distraction for the class.


Reference:

Igoa, C., (1995). The inner world of the immigrant child. Mahwah, New Jersey: Lawerence Erlbaum

Associates, Inc.
Votes: +1 / -0 Vote Up This Solution Is Useful   Vote Down This Solution Is Not Useful  

Comments posted for this solution

Alisha Wesley-Moore
Alisha Wesley-Moore
Reps: 60
I think discussing health concerns would definitely be a great idea. And too, in their country, they may not have the various outbreak of diseases (staph) that could very well be contracted through uncleanliness. The teacher could definitely have the nurse discuss the various issues and health problems that could come about. I never thought about addressing the issue in terms of health concerns and I tend to be OCD when it comes to hand washing and clean bodies.
  Posted on: June 19, 2014 7:56 pm

Reply Add a Comment
 
     
     
 
Solution 43
Posted October 27, 2013 7:23 pm

udydyV
udydyV
Reps: 108
This is a touchy subject; however, you might as well confront it now as the problem will not go away. I would meet the parents and tell them that I understand their cultural beliefs about taking showers. I would tell them that i respect their right to raise their child however they saw fit. However, I would also tell them some of the problems their child is going to encounter because of his body odor. I would tell them that the problems would more than likely get worse as the child got older. The parents are free to do what they like as you cannot make them give their child a shower. However, at least they will know the likely cause of why their child is being made fun of.
Votes: +1 / -0 Vote Up This Solution Is Useful   Vote Down This Solution Is Not Useful  

Comments posted for this solution

BeWuXe
BeWuXe
Reps: 117
Open communication is of upmost importance in this situation. Speaking with the parents will inform them of their child's situation. It is possible the parents haven't considered the differences in hygiene care as being an issue in their child's classroom. However, care must be taken not to offend their culture and beliefs. Involving a school counselor may be helpful since they have proper training in dealing with sensitive issues.
  Posted on: October 28, 2013 7:55 pm

A Battles
A Battles
Reps: 115
Right, I believe supplying the child and parents with the information is all you can really do. A parent is going to raise their child how they want to. At least you did you're part to make them aware of the situation and what kids are saying/will say in the future.
  Posted on: November 3, 2013 3:03 pm

Meredith Bryant
Meredith Bryant
Reps: 106
I agree--involving the parents is the best thing you can do. However, I wouldn't send a note home because the parents might not understand or know how to react to it. An in-person parent conference is the best way to go, so that you can fully explain your side of things and also your concern without demeaning their cultural beliefs and patterns.
  Posted on: November 3, 2013 3:39 pm

jaMyDu
jaMyDu
Reps: 119
I agree that the parents should be contacted because the child may not realize the other students are talking about him. I suggested a call, but an in person conference is also a good suggestion. It would also give the teacher a reference for the level of English the parents speak and understand which will help with communication in the future.
  Posted on: November 3, 2013 5:51 pm

Edward Kim
Edward Kim
Reps: 106
I like how you mention the potential future problems the student may have because of their personal hygiene. Again, you are looking towards the student's best interest in mind. You are not trying to attack them or their culture to make them feel bad. As a teacher you are just trying to make sure that the student is as successful as possible. The truth is simple. In this country and in this culture body odor is something that is looked down upon. Now whether or not this is fair or right is not really the question. You are judged on your personal hygiene. If the parents want their child to be as successful as possible in the real world then this is something that needs to be addressed. If the parents want their child to strictly grow up and remain in their culture and never really venture outside of their community then that is different. But with how global of a world and economy we have today, that becomes more and more difficult.
  Posted on: October 23, 2015 8:07 pm

Reply Add a Comment
 
     
     
 
Solution 44
Posted November 3, 2013 7:03 pm

yraGaD
yraGaD
Reps: 28
In this situation I would talk with the parents first. I would try to approach the situation with as much cultural sensitivity as possible. I would prefer taking a chance on them understanding that I am a concerned teacher rather than going directly to the student and creating an awkward experience for the new student. I'd explain to the parents my concerns for their child and try to work together on a plan to go forward. I would have that conversation with them sooner rather than later to prevent any further teasing by the other classroom students.
Votes: +1 / -0 Vote Up This Solution Is Useful   Vote Down This Solution Is Not Useful  

Comments posted for this solution

Amy Fletcher
Amy Fletcher
Reps: 67
I really like your suggestion about going to the parents first. This is a great idea to be up front and honest about what is going on. It seems that his father is an educated person so he should understand that even though it may be cultural that kids do get teased about things. The child's parents may not have realized how different things are in the classroom and they may be open to fix the problem.
  Posted on: June 4, 2014 11:36 pm

April Rozier
April Rozier
Reps: 110
I agree that the parents should be spoken with rather than the student. The child is following what he has been taught and may not understand that body odor is not considered an acceptable thing in America. He is already being embarrassed by the students making fun of him so I feel that letting the parents address the situation with the student is better.
  Posted on: October 20, 2014 7:33 pm

Reply Add a Comment
 
     
     
 
Solution 45
Posted June 2, 2014 5:27 am

Justin Redmond
Justin Redmond
Reps: 51
If you talk to the parents in the right manner, I can not understand how they would see you as disrespectful. NO parent would want to hear that their child gets picked on. Since the father is a college professor, he should be understanding of your concern, as he is a teacher himself. Explain to them that you do not allow the mistreatment of any student in your classroom and want it to end immediately. See if they offer any suggestions for what to do. If they do not appear to want to handle the problem themselves, it might be necessary to have a class discussion about respecting peers. I would also speak with those students who are mistreating the child and explain to them cultural differences. Explain that the child has no idea that body odor is seen as a bad trait in America. I would suggest that you try and build a good relationship with the student, then try and talk to him about U.S. culture; however, it is difficult for this to happen since he does not speak English. Try my first suggestions to begin with and see if that works.
Votes: +1 / -0 Vote Up This Solution Is Useful   Vote Down This Solution Is Not Useful  

Comments posted for this solution

Reply Add a Comment
 
     
     
 
Solution 46
Posted June 4, 2014 12:16 am

Krissy Chance-Bailey
Krissy Chance-Bailey
Reps: 65
I have had this issue in a classroom a year ago. The boy was in ninth grade and the students began to be our right rude. The route we took was a referral to the social worker to look into the situation. We did not want to bring the attention to the student but, the comments from other students was also a problem. In a situation such as this teaching thirty students must be your first objective. The distraction will not just go away. By placing it in the social workers hands arrangements can be made to shower at school or a change of clothes be provided by his parents.

Handling the situation in a discreet manner as not to embarrass the family or student. The situation will be handled and the distraction removed.
Votes: +1 / -0 Vote Up This Solution Is Useful   Vote Down This Solution Is Not Useful  

Comments posted for this solution

Reply Add a Comment
 
     
     
 
Solution 47
Posted June 4, 2014 12:41 am

Kimberly Rahn
Kimberly Rahn
Reps: 70
I believe that the child and the parents should be made aware of the situaton; however, I believe that I would call them in for a conference. I think sitting down face to face with someone would be more personal and it would also hopefully show them that you are not disrespecting their culture in any way, that you are just explaining how the other students in the class portray it. If the problem continues and creates more issues, I would get the school counselor involved in how to handle this delicate situation. The main focus should be on the child and how to handle this in the most professional manner.
Votes: +1 / -0 Vote Up This Solution Is Useful   Vote Down This Solution Is Not Useful  

Comments posted for this solution

Krissy Chance-Bailey
Krissy Chance-Bailey
Reps: 65
I would not mention it to the student without consulting my department head for advice. Sometimes this is a situation in which the counselor should handle the situation. Although the student is from Eastern Europe there may be other issues at hand. As Cristina Igoa states in her book The Inner World of the Immigrant Child, he may be in the silent stage and become more withdrawn with a conversation of his body odor.
  Posted on: June 12, 2014 1:35 pm

James Moran
James Moran
Reps: 62
I think that a conference with parents and student is the ideal solution. However, parent/teacher conferences can be difficult to set up and time consuming. I would not proceed to this step unless the issue of the body odor was in danger of causing a significant classroom disruption. Conversations with students about good behavior should precede a parent/teacher conference.
  Posted on: June 15, 2014 3:25 pm

Reply Add a Comment
 
     
     
 
Solution 48
Posted June 4, 2014 11:32 pm

Amy Fletcher
Amy Fletcher
Reps: 67
In this situation I think that you should consult the school nurse about this. You could send the student to the nurse to have a talk about hygiene in the US and get the student to talk about their culture and what they do. During the time that the student is at the nurse's office you could have a discussion with the class about cultures and hygiene as well so that the student is not present and does not feel embarrassed.
Votes: +1 / -0 Vote Up This Solution Is Useful   Vote Down This Solution Is Not Useful  

Comments posted for this solution

Reply Add a Comment
 
     
     
 
Solution 49
Posted June 5, 2014 2:54 am

Susan Esra
Susan Esra
Reps: 68
I would first speak to the other students in the classroom and make them stop making fun of him. Body odor can be a problem for many children, not just immigrants; students who live in poverty or have certain disabilities often have a hard time keeping clean. While it is not pleasant, it is not fair to allow the other students to make fun of him. Then, I would talk with the parents. I think that if this is not addressed, it will grow and continue to plague your student and cause him problems as long as he is a student in the U.S. He is too young to understand or have to make the decision himself. I would respectfully explain to his parents that the other students have noticed that he smells, and that children in the U.S. are sensitive to this. I think that, with tact, the teacher can make the parents aware of the situation without causing embarrassment. The parents may need to adjust to this cultural difference as well- making them aware of the situation could save them from embarrassment or stigmatization.
Votes: +1 / -0 Vote Up This Solution Is Useful   Vote Down This Solution Is Not Useful  

Comments posted for this solution

Hannah Nabors
Hannah Nabors
Reps: 68
Susan,
I didn't think about the parents, but your right...addressing the odor with the child could be beneficial to the parents as well. Great point! I agree with you that this is a situation that will take tact. Feeding of your suggestion, I might tell the parents that some students in the classroom were sensitive to all kinds of smells. I would tell them that uncommon smells make it difficult for them to focus and then list examples such as perfume, exotic air freshners, etc. This way it sounds like you are having to accommodate the needs of others students, rather than out right telling the parents that their child has a bad odor.
  Posted on: June 6, 2014 12:25 am

Alicia Garcia
Alicia Garcia
Reps: 69
I agree that the first thing that needs to be done in this situation is to address the insensitive laughter. Sometimes students donít think about the effect their actions will have on others. Reminding students that you expect them to be kind to one another often goes a long way. Also, I agree that a call or meeting with the parents is in order. No parent wants their child to suffer or be teased. Letting them know what is going on so that their child can have an easier time in school is important. IF a parent knows you care about their child it goes a long way to helping the child and to building the school-parent bridge Ioga frequently mentions in her writing.
  Posted on: June 8, 2014 5:38 pm

April Rozier
April Rozier
Reps: 110
I agree that informing the parents is important. Even if the hygiene issue is due to his culture, the parents may consider assimilating to the American culture to prevent him from being picked on. No parent wants their child to be the victim of ridicule and by being honest with them, you have placed the power back in the parents' hands.
  Posted on: October 20, 2014 7:31 pm

Reply Add a Comment
 
     
     
 
Solution 50
Posted June 5, 2014 10:40 pm

LeeAnna Elder
LeeAnna Elder
Reps: 75
I don't want to violate FERPA by sending home a note to all the other kids parents explaining the situation, and asking the parents to discuss how to manage their thoughts and behavior about the "smelly" kid at school. I agree with the teacher in the scenario that sending home a letter may violate or be disrespectful to their cultural differences. I think the best way to address this concern is while the "smelly" kid is out of the room, explain to the students what the law states about bullying and that teasing other students about how they smell or is culturally different is bullying. I might even have a resource officer and administrator speak to the students about bullying. I would also explain to the students that this child comes from a very different culture where body odor is the norm. The students need to know when and why to draw the line and stop teasing. In this case they may be teasing because they are unaware of the cultural differences, and these differences are uncomfortable to them. Either way if the students are not educated about cultural differences, how are they to know they need to make changes with their attitude and treatment towards someone from a different culture?
Votes: +1 / -0 Vote Up This Solution Is Useful   Vote Down This Solution Is Not Useful  

Comments posted for this solution

Alisha Wesley-Moore
Alisha Wesley-Moore
Reps: 60
Definitely. The class does need to be addressed. They are laughing at something they have no knowledge about. So the teacher should surely let them know where he stands as far as bully and teasing goes. Again, the teacher should also go forward to address the situation at hand. Sometimes bad smells make others very sick (I know it happens with me). So perhaps a conference with the parents is necessary and the nurse should be included to discuss health concerns not only for the new student but for the others in class as well.
  Posted on: June 19, 2014 8:00 pm

Reply Add a Comment
 
     
     
 
Solution 51
Posted June 6, 2014 2:11 am

Jennifer Loncon
Jennifer Loncon
Reps: 68
This is definitely a difficult situation to be in because of course you do not want to seem insensitive to their culture. Since this is an elementary aged students I'm not sure that talking to him directly would be appropriate because he might misinterpret that he has done something wrong. Instead, I would try approaching the parents in a face to face conference. I would gently explain to them the situation of the other students noticing the smell and responding to it. Explain that you respect their decisions and their culture but you wanted to at least make them aware that this may have an adverse social affect. Explain the efforts you have made to remind students that teasing is not acceptable in the classroom and then allow them to make a decision from there. Hopefully they will make an effort to help their child be fresh at school everyday.
Votes: +1 / -0 Vote Up This Solution Is Useful   Vote Down This Solution Is Not Useful  

Comments posted for this solution

RuXuqe
RuXuqe
Reps: 67
I agree with you about talking to the parents directly and explaining what you are doing to stop the teasing. I am not even sure if I would mention body odor and just say that the students have noticed that he smells different because it might be his food or soap or some other source.
  Posted on: June 7, 2015 2:01 pm

Reply Add a Comment
 
     
     
 
Solution 52
Posted June 7, 2014 2:32 pm

Tiffany Parker
Tiffany Parker
Reps: 69
I think this would be a great time to discuss cultures and their similarities and differences. I might get my students to complete short projects where they research different cultures. This could possibly explain to the students why the students smells the way he does. I would also talk to the parents and explain that I am not meaning to be disrespectful toward their culture; however, I do not want this issue to effect their son's emotional state at school.
Votes: +1 / -0 Vote Up This Solution Is Useful   Vote Down This Solution Is Not Useful  

Comments posted for this solution

LeeAnna Elder
LeeAnna Elder
Reps: 75
Good idea on having the students researching different cultures. Maybe creating compare and contrast of their culture with the one that they researched.
  Posted on: June 13, 2014 5:36 pm

Reply Add a Comment
 
     
     
 
Solution 53
Posted June 15, 2014 3:14 pm

James Moran
James Moran
Reps: 62
Ideally a teacher who has good communication and trust with parents could discuss the issue with the students parents. However, I think the best solution is to teach the other students to be considerate of the feelings of others. This doesn't mean that the other students can't talk to the student about his body odor but it does mean that the students will talk to the other student in a manor that is respectful and kind. The teacher should take steps to make sure that the other students do not make fun of or pick on the student with the body odor. However, if the other students notice and point out the body odor that is not something that should be avoided. Learning to deal with other people and their needs and wants is an important part of going to school. Sometimes people have to change the way they are to meet the social norms of the majority. However, the majority should be considerate of the minority and treat him the way they would want to be treated in the same situation.
Votes: +1 / -0 Vote Up This Solution Is Useful   Vote Down This Solution Is Not Useful  

Comments posted for this solution

Reply Add a Comment
 
     
     
 
Solution 54
Posted June 19, 2014 7:51 pm

Alisha Wesley-Moore
Alisha Wesley-Moore
Reps: 60
I understand that it may a cultural practice; however, I think it should be addressed if for nothing else but to stop the teasing. I think that a reminder about proper hygiene to the class so not to call out one particular person. Explain the importance of proper hygiene and some of the negative effects of not caring for self properly could have. I would also address the class with cultural differences and to remind students to be respectful of those differences regardless how we may think it to be strange, grotesque, or funny. Another thing, maybe you can address the parents but approach them with, "I understand our cultures are very different and I just wanted to inform you that I am working with the class on understanding differences. Some of the students do not quite understand the differences and they respond in the wrong way. Again, other teachers and I are working hard trying to get them to understand. Until then is there a way that I can have your assistance because I do not want [the new student] to have a bad experience due to their lack of understanding."

See how the parents respond to this.
Votes: +1 / -0 Vote Up This Solution Is Useful   Vote Down This Solution Is Not Useful  

Comments posted for this solution

Reply Add a Comment
 
     
     
 
Solution 55
Posted November 3, 2014 3:33 am

Jonathan Buys
Jonathan Buys
Reps: 42
I have a similar situation I am am facing in my own classroom right now. I would not attempt to speak directly with the student about it. If I witness another student making fun of that student about it I would pull them aside and have a stern talk with them about the school' zero tolerance for bullying policy, and if the issue persisted refer them to an administrator. To address the student who has the body odor smell I would contact the assigned counselor. They are trained to approach parents and students about these issues. they are also trained to detect if the body odor is connected with any abuse or neglect on part of the parents. That is what I did with the student in my class, who has very strong body odor that is connected with poor hygiene. Since this student was female I did not feel it was appropriate for a male teacher to broach the subject with her or her parents.
Votes: +1 / -0 Vote Up This Solution Is Useful   Vote Down This Solution Is Not Useful  

Comments posted for this solution

Reply Add a Comment
 
     
     
 
Solution 56
Posted November 2, 2014 7:21 pm

Qureby
Qureby
Reps: 102
My first step would be to ask the parents to come in for a conference. I think it would be best to address this issue face to face rather than in writing so there are no misunderstandings. When approaching the issue of the student's body odor I would begin by telling the parents about the way his classmates are treating him. The parents may be more open to addressing the issue if they are made aware of how it is negatively impacting their son's ability to fit in to the classroom setting.
Votes: +1 / -0 Vote Up This Solution Is Useful   Vote Down This Solution Is Not Useful  

Comments posted for this solution

Reply Add a Comment
 
     
     
 
Solution 57
Posted November 2, 2014 11:29 pm

Ashley Smith
Ashley Smith
Reps: 107
At first, I am not sure how to go about handling the experience that you are sharing in this forum. However, I think I would speak with the counselor about the situation. He/She may be able to speak with the other students in a more delicate manner to help them understand the cultural difference that the student exhibits. I do think that the situation will eventually have to be discussed with the parents, along with the counselor, to let them know about the situation that is starting to affect the social experiences of the student in the classroom. I would begin the discussion with the understanding that you are not trying to be disrespectful to their way of life or their cultural beliefs. I think the parents would be thankful that you addressed such as delicate topic with them in a respectful manner.
Votes: +1 / -0 Vote Up This Solution Is Useful   Vote Down This Solution Is Not Useful  

Comments posted for this solution

Whitney Johnson
Whitney Johnson
Reps: 97
I think that kids will be kids and no matter how many times you talk to them about a situation like that they will wither take it the wrong way or just not understand at all. I also think the correct thing to do in this situation is to get the counselor involved.
  Posted on: November 3, 2014 1:54 am

Reply Add a Comment
 
     
     
 
Solution 58
Posted December 1, 2014 4:32 am

HyraLe
HyraLe
Reps: 73
You should send a letter home with the other students letting their parents know to please speak with them about how they treat others and not picking on other people in the classroom regardless of their situation. You don't have to go into specific details about the problem in the classroom but just let the parents be aware that some students are picking at others and that this is disruptive in the classroom. Then schedule a conference with the smelly child's parents letting them know what is going on. I'm sure that if they care about the emotional well being of their child then they will make some changes so that he will come to school without the odor anymore. Also, having the school counselor present, will make the conference go a lot easier. They may understand where the counselor is coming from a little better. I had a situation like this and both the counselor and I spoke to the parents. Afterwards, there was no problem at all.
Votes: +1 / -0 Vote Up This Solution Is Useful   Vote Down This Solution Is Not Useful  

Comments posted for this solution

Reply Add a Comment
 
     
     
 
Solution 59
Posted June 1, 2015 4:34 pm

Ashley Lawrence
Ashley Lawrence
Reps: 70
I would definitely go to the grade level counselor and administrator for advice on this. You do not want to make the child or parents angry at you. Part of counselor's jobs at that level is to handle situations like this. They can call the parents in and have a conversation especially since there is a bullying aspect to this situation.
Votes: +1 / -0 Vote Up This Solution Is Useful   Vote Down This Solution Is Not Useful  

Comments posted for this solution

Reply Add a Comment
 
     
     
 
Solution 60
Posted June 2, 2015 3:02 pm

Kaitlin Stringer
Kaitlin Stringer
Reps: 116
I think it is important to address this problem with the entire class. If you talk to the student directly, you might embarrass him and this might change how he acts in class. I think teaching a mini health lesson on hygiene would benefit the student and the entire class. You could discuss how we clean our bodies and the importance of washing our hair, body, and even teeth. Students could then brainstorm ways to keep themselves clean and healthy, ex: showering, deodorant, brushing teeth. Following this lesson, I might send home a newsletter to parents about the importance of hygiene as their students' bodies change. I agree this is a very sensitive subject, but I think tackling it head on is the best solution.
Votes: +1 / -0 Vote Up This Solution Is Useful   Vote Down This Solution Is Not Useful  

Comments posted for this solution

Jill Elton
Jill Elton
Reps: 108
I agree that tackling this situation head on is the right avenue to take. I believe that the hygiene lesson and newsletter is a wonderful idea. However, if after the mini lesson and sending home the newsletter things do not improve, I would definitely call for a parent/teacher conference. Because we do not know the age of the elementary school child, this body odor could be a medical sign of distress within the body. Suggesting that the child be examined by a doctor could help rule out any medical issues. Too, the doctor/nurse may help in reinforcing the healthy hygiene lesson.
  Posted on: October 25, 2015 3:14 am

Reply Add a Comment
 
     
     
 
Solution 61
Posted June 4, 2015 7:07 pm

Sarah Davis
Sarah Davis
Reps: 69
This is a difficult situation since this is normal in the student's culture. I think you should first address this issue by having a mini-hygiene lesson with the entire class. During this lesson, you should also address appropriate ways to treat peers who may have hygiene issues. I also suggest sending home a parent letter to inform parents of the lesson being taught. If the problem continues, I suggest that you contact the parents for a conference. You should address the parents by asking them if the student has informed them of any issues at home and continue from there. You should also let them know how well he does in class and that you do not want this to effect him academically or emotionally.
Votes: +1 / -0 Vote Up This Solution Is Useful   Vote Down This Solution Is Not Useful  

Comments posted for this solution

Nicole Turner
Nicole Turner
Reps: 70
I agree that having a hygiene lesson may catch that student's attention and he might be able to go home and tell his parents without the teacher having to get involved with either.
  Posted on: June 4, 2015 8:35 pm

Reply Add a Comment
 
     
     
 
Solution 62
Posted November 2, 2015 2:09 am

Amanda Robinson
Amanda Robinson
Reps: 98
I would personally not feel comfortable address the child or the parent in this situation. I would pass this along to the counselors to see if they could address it properly. As a high school teacher, if I am having a problem with it, I'm sure the other teachers are as well.
Votes: +1 / -0 Vote Up This Solution Is Useful   Vote Down This Solution Is Not Useful  

Comments posted for this solution

Reply Add a Comment
 
     
     
 
Solution 63
Posted December 8, 2012 10:14 pm

Laine Vilardi
Laine Vilardi
Reps: 119
I think that two go-to people in this situation will be the school nurse and the school counselor. You want to be very sensitive to the situation, but you are only looking after the child's well being after all. You don't want to seem like you are discriminating them and their culture in anyway.
Votes: +1 / -1 Vote Up This Solution Is Useful   Vote Down This Solution Is Not Useful  

Comments posted for this solution

Nicki Kinner
Nicki Kinner
Reps: 68
I definitely agree with you. It is important to involve administration in these kinds of matters and ask their opinion. You want the student to feel comfortable in the school and not insult their cultural background and beliefs.
  Posted on: June 4, 2013 12:29 pm

Josh Oglesby
Josh Oglesby
Reps: 69
I guess I look at it from my usual "can-do" approach and did not think about utilizing the nurse or counselor. Both of these would be great resources to include in the parent meeting but i still believe that the primary faciliatator should be the teacher as they will have the most contact with the student and parents. The nurse and counselor can contribute heavily to the meeting but i would not want to push the entire meeting into their hands.
  Posted on: June 2, 2014 7:37 pm

egyveW
egyveW
Reps: 103
I agree that contacting the nurse would be a good idea as well. I had not even thought about it, but the nurse may have valuable insight on how to approach the matter.
  Posted on: October 24, 2014 11:35 pm

Ashley Smith
Ashley Smith
Reps: 107
I did not think about the asking the school nurse to join the conversation, but she would be a great medical perspective to show the parents that the health of the student is the interest of all persons involved in this difficult issue. A straightforward approach with multiple professionals involved in the meeting will help the parents understand that the cultural outlooks are not being attacked, but rather the goal is for the student to feel comfortable in the learning environment to meet the academic goals that are explored in the classroom.
  Posted on: November 2, 2014 11:34 pm

Reply Add a Comment
 
     
     
 
Solution 64
Posted December 9, 2012 10:36 pm

Linda Swinson
Linda Swinson
Reps: 107
Instead of sending home a letter you may speak with the student by himself first and if he feel you should speak with parents you should go that route next. Let them all know you are trying to help him avoid further tornment by other students in class; don't forget to let them know you are aware of their culture beliefs as well.
Votes: +1 / -1 Vote Up This Solution Is Useful   Vote Down This Solution Is Not Useful  

Comments posted for this solution

Reply Add a Comment
 
     
     
 
Solution 65
Posted June 6, 2013 9:51 pm

Kelly Jackson
Kelly Jackson
Reps: 103
I really like the possible solution of speaking to the students who are doing the bullying in private in attempt to remedy the issue. Students from other cultures need to understand and respect people who are not exactly the same as them. The world is full of unique cultures that should be cherished. If that does not work I would get a school counselor involved and punish the students who are bullying the Eastern European student.
Votes: +1 / -2 Vote Up This Solution Is Useful   Vote Down This Solution Is Not Useful  

Comments posted for this solution

VyQaqu
VyQaqu
Reps: 71
I totally agree with you. The students in this class need to be addressed as well. No matter what the situation, no student deserves to be picked on or talked about. The teacher in this classroom needs to make sure that she or he lets the students know that their behavior is unacceptable and the class will treat each other as they would like to be treated.
  Posted on: June 7, 2013 8:22 pm

Jonathan Buys
Jonathan Buys
Reps: 42
I tend to follow along your way of dealing with this. This situation is delicate, parents need to be notified of the bullying if it doesn't stop, and if the body odor is very strong and indicative of poor hygiene they should be notified as well, however I would also get the school counselor involved.
  Posted on: November 3, 2014 3:38 am

nydyra
nydyra
Reps: 202
I think if the issue with the child was handled first and they were also taught how other cultures live, they may learn the lesson on their own without needed punishment.
  Posted on: October 17, 2015 7:35 am

Reply Add a Comment
 
     
     
 
Solution 66
Posted June 9, 2013 2:09 pm

eDaNep
eDaNep
Reps: 66
The first thing I would do is make sure the student understands that it is not okay for other students to pick on him. I'd explain to him why other kids may be treating him wrong. Then I'd provide him with some deodorant and a washcloth and access to a private bathroom (perhaps one reserved for teachers or located in the gym or special needs classroom.) If he chooses to he would be able to take care of his hygiene needs and perhaps keep him from continued disrespect from his peers.
Votes: +1 / -2 Vote Up This Solution Is Useful   Vote Down This Solution Is Not Useful  

Comments posted for this solution

Jordyn Nail
Jordyn Nail
Reps: 108
I like this idea. You aren't forcing the child, but you are giving them a option that is private and will not add to their embarrassment. This is a simple, yet effective strategy.
  Posted on: November 1, 2013 10:31 am

Kim Lucas
Kim Lucas
Reps: 107
I like your idea as well. This would be the first thing that I would try, especially if it was happening in upper elementary, where the child could choose to quietly take care of the situation. If it was happening in a younger elementary class, this might be a bit trickier. I have had situations that had nothing to do with cultural differences, but of students who came to school in clothes that smelled due to wetting the bed, or some other type of accident, and the younger students do not always know how to fix the smell problem!
  Posted on: October 27, 2014 3:10 am

GyJeWy
GyJeWy
Reps: 105
Explaining that it is not okay to be picked on is definitely the first step!
  Posted on: November 2, 2014 10:19 pm

vabehe
vabehe
Reps: 69
I think it is important for him to know that teasing and bullying is not acceptable. Opening up a line of communication between you and the student is important. Knowing he can trust you would be a good start to possibly answering any future questions he might have about hygiene, cultural norms and other things.
  Posted on: June 2, 2015 3:41 am

Kaitlin Stringer
Kaitlin Stringer
Reps: 116
I think a class lesson on bullying would be a great idea! I don't know if I would necessarily talk to the students individually to begin with, but I might begin with a lesson for the entire class. If the issue continues, I would then pull aside those students and tell them that their behavior is unacceptable.
  Posted on: June 2, 2015 3:04 pm

Reply Add a Comment
 
     
     
 
Solution 67
Posted December 4, 2012 10:11 am

David Sanders
David Sanders
Reps: 143
Contact the parents and explain the situation. I doubt the parents will want their child subject to redicule. They will more than likely correct the problem. My friends have had to deal with a similar problem when inviting a european couple to go swimming and realizing that the european customs concerning body hair are quit different than here in America. The couple understood and the issue became a non issue, and they were very appreciative that they were saved the public embarassment at the pool.
Votes: +0 / -0 Vote Up This Solution Is Useful   Vote Down This Solution Is Not Useful  

Comments posted for this solution

BeWuXe
BeWuXe
Reps: 117
I agree it is possible the parents haven't even considered that not bathing more frequently is an issue for their son. Your friends experience with the European couple is a perfect example. I can't help but wonder if the father is experiencing anything similar in his workplace. If the son is not bathing as often as he should it it certainly possible his father's bathing habits are similar. By bringing this situation to the attention of the parents may not only benefit the son, but possibly the parents as well.
  Posted on: October 28, 2013 8:07 pm

Reply Add a Comment
 
     
     
 
Solution 68
Posted December 7, 2012 10:06 pm

Art Buff
Art Buff
Reps: 111
Well as I understand it schools generally have a cleanliness policy as lack of bathing can create health problems with the student in question as well as those around him (lice for example). It may not be a bathing issue however. Some cultures cook foods that have very strong aromas and stick fiercely in clothes and hair. It may be that the household itself, which is clean, just has a constant and overwhelming food aroma. I have heard of teachers making deals with students that had bathing/body odor issues before where they allow the student to arrive a little bit earlier to school and use the locker room showers when no one is in there so they can get clean with out having everyone know what they are doing. Obviously something must be done as the constant harassment of this student cannot be tolerated. While approaching the parents about this may be tricky it still might be more beneficial (than harmful) for all parties involved.
Votes: +0 / -0 Vote Up This Solution Is Useful   Vote Down This Solution Is Not Useful  

Comments posted for this solution

Heidi Landon
Heidi Landon
Reps: 58
Good point about food aromas. This might be a place to start when addressing this issue. I think by getting to know the student, parents, and their culture may be beneficial to figuring out the odor. Allowing the student to come earlier is a good idea as well. That issue needs to be addressed with parents first however.
  Posted on: June 4, 2013 1:39 am

Emilee Roberts
Emilee Roberts
Reps: 69
That was a good point about strong odors coming from the foods they cook and eat. I think that several cultures use aromatics in thier food. Not only does the odor come from the cooking process but also many of these foods are secreted from the pores as well.
  Posted on: June 5, 2013 9:59 am

Johnnie Skelton
Johnnie Skelton
Reps: 104
It doesnít sound like this is really a health risk. Of course, if it became a cleanliness problem in which a student had parasites, that would be another issue, and the teacher would need to investigate or involve the counselor and nurse to look into a possible situation of neglect. Based on the information we have, however, it sounds like this is just an instance of cultural difference. If the source of the smell is food, perhaps it would be a good idea to facilitate a bit more acceptance through a multicultural food day on which all of the students brought something to share from another culture.
  Posted on: June 5, 2013 11:47 am

Krissy Chance-Bailey
Krissy Chance-Bailey
Reps: 65
I agree with Johnnie, I would introduce through the lesson the importance of hygiene but not directly speak to the child. He is already in a new place, school and life. It may shut him down completely.
  Posted on: June 12, 2014 1:37 pm

Alicia Garcia
Alicia Garcia
Reps: 69
Differences in diet can also cause changes in the smell of sweat regardless of cleanliness. For example, once I was on a kick where I was cooking a lot of green vegetables, like kale, in cumin and curry because it was a low calorie nutrient rich meal (I know some of you probably think that sounds gross but it was nutritious!). After three servings of this meal (I was on a tight budget - don't judge) I noticed a change in the smell of my sweat so I stopped eating any spices for a while.
Some other foods that can change the smell of sweat include red meat, onions and garlic. These are common ingredients in a lot of American foods like spaghetti and hamburgers. Some Americans eat these foods really frequently. Apart from being unhealthy, a diet high in red meat and onions can have an unfortunate impact in the way that individual smells. My point is diet can effect smell even if a person is bathing regularly. Based on this information I agree that doing some background research on culture could be valuable before you speak with the parents. Speaking with the student and the parents is pretty essential at this point if you want to help your student be accepted and make friends. Stopping the teasing in class alone is not going to cut it.
  Posted on: June 14, 2014 8:44 pm

etyWys
etyWys
Reps: 205
Good point. I've seen hygiene addressed in dress codes/code of conduct manuals from schools before. I think this would be worth looking in to.
  Posted on: February 25, 2017 7:33 pm

Reply Add a Comment
 
     
     
 
Solution 69
Posted December 8, 2012 2:32 pm

Amari Hagan
Amari Hagan
Reps: 115
I would let the parents know by sending a concerned letter home first. I would let them know I am just concerned and will understand if it may be cultural incident. I would remind my students that everyone is different and we need to respect each other because we all come from different cultures. I would also inform each student that if it were he or she they would not like it if someone was making fun of them. Then I would stress very strongly that I am not going to tolerate any one making fun or doing anything to make another student feel uncomfortable.
Votes: +0 / -0 Vote Up This Solution Is Useful   Vote Down This Solution Is Not Useful  

Comments posted for this solution

Nick Hanna
Nick Hanna
Reps: 71
Your idea to send home a concern letter is good and that you tie in that you understand it may be a cultural issue makes it even better. Make sure that it is worded in a positive way though, because depending on the parents, it could be seen as disrespectful or rude. Also, be cautious in how you approach the lesson on other cultures and make sure it is not just centered on "smells" or body odor. Other students will put the pieces together and it could lead to an increased amount of bullying, because they will see him as a snitch or tattletale.
  Posted on: June 12, 2014 2:24 pm

Reply Add a Comment
 
     
     
 
Solution 70
Posted December 9, 2012 6:57 pm

sierra h
sierra h
Reps: 47
I would talk to your grade level counselor and ask for advice not naming any student out right explain that this student is being made fun of behind their back and that your student could be of another culture. if that solution doent pan out ask your head administration for backing or pramission to contact the parents explaining that the students personal hygeane is causing the student to be made fun of by their fellow students and that as a teacher you are hoping to colaborate with them to come up with a possible solution to aid the student in feeling more comfortable in class.
Votes: +0 / -0 Vote Up This Solution Is Useful   Vote Down This Solution Is Not Useful  

Comments posted for this solution

Colleen Keller
Colleen Keller
Reps: 92
I think it would be a very good idea to talk with the counselor and get some advice. You want to make the student comfortable when you have to talk with them about the situation. I also like that you said to collaborate with other teachers because the is a very large chance that someone else has been through that situation, and could help shed some light on what to do.
  Posted on: June 6, 2013 7:56 pm

Reply Add a Comment
 
     
     
 
Solution 71
Posted December 13, 2012 11:02 am

Kenneth Smith
Kenneth Smith
Reps: 26
I would pull the student aside and talk with him about the situation. I would ask if this was a cultural thing, if he did not like taking baths, or if the food that was cooked at home had a strong aroma. Next, I would call down to the office and explain to the principle that there was a student heading to the office and explain why. I would have a talk with the rest of the class explaining that it is disrespectful to pick on other students. Once I talked with the class, I would have a talk with the principle and the counselor of our school, and see if they would have a talk with the parents.
Votes: +0 / -0 Vote Up This Solution Is Useful   Vote Down This Solution Is Not Useful  

Comments posted for this solution

Reply Add a Comment
 
     
     
 
Solution 72
Posted February 18, 2013 1:11 am

Kimberly Sands
Kimberly Sands
Reps: 60
I would set up a small conference for you and the parents in private. Relay the issue to them, but make sure that it is in a way that doesn't attack or threaten their views and beliefs. Just because they are Eastern European doesn't mean they follow that same cultural view, so instead of saying something like, "I know where you're previously from they believe this..." try saying, "I don't mean to be disrespectful or over step, but I want to make sure that *student's name* feels comfortable and ready for his day of school, and that he and his peers can work together and learn without distraction." Seeing as bullying has become a hot button topic as well, you might want to mention this to the parents as well. Explain to them, if they take offense, that you are truly trying to look out for the child, as other students have become aware of the odor and are picking on him.
Votes: +0 / -0 Vote Up This Solution Is Useful   Vote Down This Solution Is Not Useful  

Comments posted for this solution

Stormye Brantley
Stormye Brantley
Reps: 121
I think setting up a conference with the parents is a great idea. I was thinking after I pressed "submit" on my response that perhaps contacting the parents and explaining the situation would also be a good solution. Certainly the parents would try to help their child "fit in" to American schools.
  Posted on: October 24, 2013 7:37 pm

Reply Add a Comment
 
     
     
 
Solution 73
Posted June 3, 2013 7:01 am

Jessica Heilman
Jessica Heilman
Reps: 58
I would speak to the students who are making fun of him and explain why he smells the way he does. If they continue doing it even after you have explained to them what is going on, then they should receive a consequence. Their consequence could be something such as researching this child's culture and writing a report on it and then comparing American culture to this child's culture. As far as speaking to the child about it, I would maybe do a lesson on American culture in class as part of Social Studies and maybe hint at the fact that Americans bathe everyday? This might allow him to get the hint. I wouldn't directly address to him or his parents though.
Votes: +0 / -0 Vote Up This Solution Is Useful   Vote Down This Solution Is Not Useful  

Comments posted for this solution

Hope Crosby
Hope Crosby
Reps: 122
I also felt it was important to reprimand the teasing students, in addition to addressing the issue of cultural differences. Regardless of differences or circumstances, no child should be picked on or teased, and those that choose to do so, should be corrected.
  Posted on: October 27, 2013 4:56 pm

Nick Thrower
Nick Thrower
Reps: 67
Yes, it is important to reprimand these kids, however, it will continue then outside of the classroom. An attack on both fronts needs to happen by the teacher. The children need to be scolded, and "the smelly" kid needs to be a part of a parent conference.
  Posted on: June 13, 2014 3:15 pm

ezaDyR
ezaDyR
Reps: 100
Yes, the other students should be reprimanded from their poor choices. But in order to help the issue I would politely inform the parents what has been going on.
  Posted on: October 19, 2014 12:29 pm

Reply Add a Comment
 
     
     
 
Solution 74
Posted June 4, 2013 1:43 am

Heidi Landon
Heidi Landon
Reps: 58
I think the first step would be to build a rapport with the student and the parents. Being from a different country they may still be adjusting to American culture. I think by using staff members like the counselor or the nurse could be a good starting point to figuring out more information about the student. I may let them contact the parents if the issue continues to worsen. They are more equip to deal with issues like this and how to go about finding a resolution.
Votes: +0 / -0 Vote Up This Solution Is Useful   Vote Down This Solution Is Not Useful  

Comments posted for this solution

Jill Elton
Jill Elton
Reps: 108
I, too, think that building rapport with the parents is invaluable. I also agree that asking the counselor, or nurse if you have one at your school, about the student would be a good starting place. However, as the teacher (who may have a very sensitive nose such as myself...who would throw up at this smell), I would have to find a resolution very quickly. In doing so, I would ask the parents to come in for a parent/teacher conference. I believe they would be "on board" with helping their child to adjust to his new setting as quickly as possible, regardless of what was required.
  Posted on: October 25, 2015 3:31 am

Reply Add a Comment
 
     
     
 
Solution 75
Posted June 6, 2013 7:49 pm

Colleen Keller
Colleen Keller
Reps: 92
This is a very difficult and touchy subject to deal with. I personally would pull the student aside and discuss the situation with him first. I would try to understand the child's culture and get a feel for where this "smelly situation" is coming from. If there was no change, I would talk with the office, counselor, and nurse about seeing what we can do for the child to help him, but not make him feel awkward. Then I would have the student run an errand for me so I could have a chance to talk with the class about accepting others and being kind no matter what. If no changes are made, I would see if we could make a call to the parents.
Votes: +0 / -0 Vote Up This Solution Is Useful   Vote Down This Solution Is Not Useful  

Comments posted for this solution

Reply Add a Comment
 
     
     
 
Solution 76
Posted June 6, 2013 11:50 pm

gyjyjy
gyjyjy
Reps: 71
I feel that this is a tough situation because different cultures do have different views and you do not want to offend anyone. However if other students are noticing the problem and are making fun of the child, it is not good for the student. I know at our school our P.E. teacher usually gives a health lesson that deals with personal hygiene. The school counselor and nurse are also great resources to use within the school on such situations. I do feel that the teacher can set up a parent-teacher conference to discuss what is occurring and that she wanted to make them aware of the situation. I would be careful with how I approach the situation with the parents and make sure I do not make them feel like their culture is not appropriate or wrong.
Votes: +0 / -0 Vote Up This Solution Is Useful   Vote Down This Solution Is Not Useful  

Comments posted for this solution

yVyLyG
yVyLyG
Reps: 69
It is important to adress this issue with extreme understanding and caution. It can be assumed that if the student has these hygiene issues due to cultural differences, than the parents may also have the same scent. Discussing this could easily enter the zone of inappropriateness and appear as though the teacher has poor cultural awareness. I would leave any interactions directly as a last resort.
  Posted on: June 9, 2013 7:19 pm

Sara LeClair
Sara LeClair
Reps: 68
I think you provided a good idea of having the counselor talk to the whole class about hygiene and body issues. This may help the situation to an extent and the child may understand that it is okay to bathe every day. If not, you may want to contact the parent if the bullying does not stop. I would also talk with an administrator first about contacting the parents.
  Posted on: June 3, 2014 6:25 pm

Reply Add a Comment
 
     
     
 
Solution 77
Posted June 9, 2013 9:15 pm

L. Carrell
L. Carrell
Reps: 63
As a teacher we cannot allow students to pick on each other. This is a delicate situation because of his cultural background. I think the teacher should notify the parents that other children are picking on their child because of the body odor and be sure to let them know there have been consequences for the children who were rude. If the father is working as a music professor at a university, he is around Americans and would be aware that body odor can be an issue in the United States. Sometimes employers will even speak to their employees if they do not have good hygiene. The father should understand the issue even if he does not agree with the other students.
Votes: +0 / -0 Vote Up This Solution Is Useful   Vote Down This Solution Is Not Useful  

Comments posted for this solution

Erin Ashurst
Erin Ashurst
Reps: 73
I agree that the bullying students should have consequences. Including the parents in the conversation about the situation is a must.
  Posted on: June 9, 2013 9:24 pm

Reply Add a Comment
 
     
     
 
Solution 78
Posted June 9, 2013 9:18 pm

Erin Ashurst
Erin Ashurst
Reps: 73
I would suggest meeting with his parents just to open communication with them about their culture and child. Then I would contact them about their son. I would emphasize that the classroom is a tight space for the students and that the other students have noticed that their son doesn't have the same bathing habits. I would suggest that they explain to their son that Americans have different habits than them, and that it's completely okay to be different.
Votes: +0 / -0 Vote Up This Solution Is Useful   Vote Down This Solution Is Not Useful  

Comments posted for this solution

Reply Add a Comment
 
     
     
 
Solution 79
Posted June 9, 2013 10:01 pm

Kimberly Spicer
Kimberly Spicer
Reps: 71
This is a really sticky situation to handle. Some way someone is going to get hurt or offended. This being said, I do not think it's a great idea to contact the parents as the first solution. I would talk individually to the students that were teasing the new student and have them give me a reason why they are doing what they are doing. I would also let those students know that the odor may not even be because the student doesn't bathe. I would go through all possible solutions with the student. Then, I would think of something that is very smelly that we eat in our culture or something strange that we do in our culture that is not accepted in other cultures.
Also, the teacher can try to open the windows in the classroom to circulate the air or maybe try some outside teaching activities so it won't be so fragrant like in the classroom.
Votes: +0 / -0 Vote Up This Solution Is Useful   Vote Down This Solution Is Not Useful  

Comments posted for this solution

Cardia Foster
Cardia Foster
Reps: 73
I agree, the smell could come from the food that they may cook and eat. As you said this is an issue that needs to be handled with care. You don't want anyone to feel offended or disrespected.
  Posted on: June 5, 2014 4:48 pm

Reply Add a Comment
 
     
     
 
Solution 80
Posted October 21, 2013 3:07 pm

Emily West
Emily West
Reps: 102
I have been in a similar situation where a student began to smell of body odor due to a lack of bathing and deodorant. This student was not an immigrant and I asked the parents about the issue during a conference. I was a little nervous on how to bring up the issue and tried my best not to offend them and they actually admitted that they had smelled it too. They were very gracious of my concern and he began to shower more often and wear deodorant. Your situation is a little different because he is from Eastern Europe and some cultures there do not emphasize bathing and preventing body odor as much. Because this is more of a cultural issue you must proceed with caution on how you address the issue with the parents. I think that going to the school nurse and the school counselor would be a good idea. Both of them could probably give you some tips and advice on how to approach the issue. I think that having a meeting with the parents would be a better option than sending a note or simply calling. I would suggest bringing the issue up in a way that shows you are not disrespecting their culture, but that his odor may cause other students to notice and because it is not something they're used to they may start saying things to him that could hurt his feelings. Hopefully the parents would understand your good intensions in the conversation and they would be gracious for your information. I think you would have to talk to them and get a sense of how they are before bringing the topic of body odor up to them. If they seem to be offended easily or defensive of their culture it may be more difficult to tell them. just remind them that you are discussing the issue with the best intensions for their son.
Votes: +0 / -0 Vote Up This Solution Is Useful   Vote Down This Solution Is Not Useful  

Comments posted for this solution

Susan Esra
Susan Esra
Reps: 68
I agree that meeting with the parents in person is preferable to sending a note or email. Even if the parents speak English, meeting face-to-face would help alleviate miscommunication that could be caused by language or cultural misunderstandings.
  Posted on: June 5, 2014 2:57 am

Megan Teague
Megan Teague
Reps: 55

I had a similar situation in my classroom. I had a student that came to school smelling and he was always dirty. However, his was not a cultural issue. I would often help him clean his feet and give him socks to wear with his shoes. This was a hard topic to bring up with parents and unfortunately it was a mater of socks and clean clothes or food and movies to watch.
  Posted on: June 16, 2014 4:03 am

Reply Add a Comment
 
     
     
 
Solution 81
Posted October 27, 2013 9:38 am

A Battles
A Battles
Reps: 115
I would talk to the parents and let them know about the situation. While speaking with them you can find out if this is in fact a cultural thing that is happening. If so I would just explain to the parents how the kids are picking on him because of his odor. While being culturally sensitive I would ask their opinion on the matter. I do not think parents would want their son to get picked on if it was avoidable. If the parents decide that it is not an issue then I would explain to the class how cultures do things differently. (This lesson would have hygiene included but not solely be about hygiene as to not make it so personal.)
Votes: +0 / -0 Vote Up This Solution Is Useful   Vote Down This Solution Is Not Useful  

Comments posted for this solution

Laura Toft
Laura Toft
Reps: 71
Having a strong relationship with the parents is going to be very important for all partied involved. Getting the school nurse and counselor involved with talking to the new student as well as the ESOL teacher will help address the problem as well.
  Posted on: June 2, 2014 9:40 pm

Reply Add a Comment
 
     
     
 
Solution 82
Posted October 28, 2013 7:49 pm

BeWuXe
BeWuXe
Reps: 117
As a novice teacher, dealing with such a sensitive matter can be quite a challenge. However, it is of upmost importance not to let the situation continue. First of all, the children doing the teasing must be made aware that their actions are not appropriate. Although it may be difficult for a younger child to understand the differences of cultures, they must be made aware it is not appropriate to tease another student regardless of the reason. I would also recommend the parents of the students be contacted to inform them of their actions. Gaining parental support is always helpful in re-enforcing the need for improvement in classroom behaviors. Now, dealing with the hygiene of the young boy is more difficult. Although culture may be playing a role in his hygiene habits, it is having a negative impact within the classroom. Since you are a novice teacher it is important to seek the expertise of a school counselor or nurse. Allowing someone who is better trained in dealing with issues such as this may be the best course of action. Having a counselor or nurse contact the family to explain the situation and how it is affecting their son may be better received.
Votes: +0 / -0 Vote Up This Solution Is Useful   Vote Down This Solution Is Not Useful  

Comments posted for this solution

Kristen Eason
Kristen Eason
Reps: 57
The teacher should inform the school counselor about the childís issues. I believe the counselor can discuss with the entire class about the importance of having good hygiene. During this time, the teacher can also discuss the importance and compare and contrast the different hygiene methods that other cultures have. This issue may also have nothing to do with the childís culture but rather he doesnít enjoy taking baths and the parents are unaware of this.
  Posted on: June 2, 2014 3:53 pm

ezyXyh
ezyXyh
Reps: 57
I agree the school counselor should help out in this matter. I don't know if I would do a whole class lesson because they may make the matter worse. But some one-on-one time with the child may be more beneficial.
  Posted on: June 8, 2015 2:05 am

Reply Add a Comment
 
     
     
 
Solution 83
Posted October 29, 2013 8:31 pm

Jordyn Nail
Jordyn Nail
Reps: 108
The student is probably already embarrassed so I don't think that speaking to him would add to that. Speak with the student about the issue and offer to teach him about hygiene and how to prevent the issue. Contacting his parents is a good idea, because you want them to know that you are sensitive toward their culture but you want to save their student some embarrassment.
Votes: +0 / -0 Vote Up This Solution Is Useful   Vote Down This Solution Is Not Useful  

Comments posted for this solution

Laura Toft
Laura Toft
Reps: 71
Doing a mini lesson and talking with the class as a whole on ways we can improve taking care of ourselves would be a safe way to discuss this in class. As the teacher you could even say that you don't always bathe everyday, but you know it's important to shower every other day, brush your teeth, floss, brush your hair and other things for the students to listen to. This way you can emphasize how bathing is important and it should be done often without pointing him out.
  Posted on: June 2, 2014 9:38 pm

Cardia Foster
Cardia Foster
Reps: 73
Talking to the student about hygiene is a great idea, but I would have someone else present like the nurse or the counselor present. One of these individuals need to be present because you don't want the child to think that you're picking on him.
  Posted on: June 5, 2014 4:52 pm

Reply Add a Comment
 
     
     
 
Solution 84
Posted October 30, 2013 4:30 pm

yZaveh
yZaveh
Reps: 109
The problem with this studentís body odor is that it is beginning to affect the students around him. You risk embarrassing the student two ways- if you speak to him privately, it may embarrass him, but if you donít say anything and allow it to go on, he may be embarrassed worse if his peers make fun of him. I think the best solution would to talk to his parents about it, even if it risks insulting them. It is better to non-intentionally insult an adult rather than scar an emotionally sensitive immigrant student with an embarrassing moment. You just have to bet on his parents being understanding. I would imagine that since his father is an educated man and a professor, he has a better grasp of the culture of the US and would be understanding of the situation, seeing you as a concerned teacher helping a student. I would, however, make sure to speak to him over the phone or in perfect, as tone and meaning can sometimes be lost over text like email.
Votes: +0 / -0 Vote Up This Solution Is Useful   Vote Down This Solution Is Not Useful  

Comments posted for this solution

BazuTy
BazuTy
Reps: 116
Well thinking just because the father is education and professional automatically makes him understand, I believe is stereotyping the father. I believe immigrants will stick up for their culture and will seldom disown their own culture to fit in. I could only think about my undergrad years at Fort Valley State University. I had two foreign professors that had body odor that was extraneous. They had been living in the country for years and one of the professors explained to the class that he takes bathes but he doesn't use toilettes. He stated that he was from England and due to the cold climate; people usually bathe every other day. I could only think, " you are now in Middle Georgia where it is no longer cold and the humidity is scorching in the summertime". He also explained that he used natural products for toilettes and the Americanized toilettes are considered in his culture to be harmful chemicals. He showed the class the supplements he used in place of our common toilettes. I believe calling a meeting with the parents with assistances from other professional staff members is key. I wouldnít just call a meeting about the kidís body odor, but I would addressed it as point that needs to be discussed. As an educator the teacher needs to research more about the studentís culture and beliefs.
  Posted on: October 31, 2013 7:49 am

LaChristen Boyd
LaChristen Boyd
Reps: 68
Just because his father is educated he will not understand. In fact, I think he will be highly offensive. If he understood, he would already be taking care of the body odors. When people come from different counties and backgrounds, most of the time they are not willing to change. I would not call his father.
  Posted on: June 4, 2014 8:43 pm

Reply Add a Comment
 
     
     
 
Solution 85
Posted November 3, 2013 3:38 pm

Meredith Bryant
Meredith Bryant
Reps: 106
I can honestly say that I have never encountered this before! However, I would have an in-person parent conference to first bring up the issues. Find out of this is actually stemming from his culture or if it's just the lack of good hygiene. Then, explain to the parents your genuine concern, which is the well-being of their child in front of other students. With them and potentially the school counselor, see if together, you could work it out.
Votes: +0 / -0 Vote Up This Solution Is Useful   Vote Down This Solution Is Not Useful  

Comments posted for this solution

wendy burns
wendy burns
Reps: 80
I agree with your comments. The teacher most definitely needs to set up a conference with the parents and discuss how to handle the situation.
  Posted on: June 9, 2014 1:11 am

Reply Add a Comment
 
     
     
 
Solution 86
Posted November 3, 2013 5:43 pm

jaMyDu
jaMyDu
Reps: 119
The first action I would take is to tell your students that making fun of others is not acceptable and does not demonstrate appropriate social skills. Then you should call his parents and approach it from a behavioral aspect. If I were you, I would ask them if their child had mentioned that his feelings had been hurt by anyone in the class. He may not realize other students are laughing at him because of his language barriers. I would tell them that I am addressing the issue of other students making fun of their child in my class and that I have higher expectations for my students. I would hope that starting the conversation in this way would lead them to question why and then I could discuss the odor issue and the norms in America for personal hygiene in a way that is not insulting.
Votes: +0 / -0 Vote Up This Solution Is Useful   Vote Down This Solution Is Not Useful  

Comments posted for this solution

Caley Copeland
Caley Copeland
Reps: 69
I agree that I would address the issue of bullying with the class. You might could even do a mini-lesson on how to accept people of different cultures. I would try handling it in class first, but if the problem kept going I could recommend calling the parents like you suggest.
  Posted on: June 6, 2014 3:31 am

Reply Add a Comment
 
     
     
 
Solution 87
Posted June 3, 2014 3:56 am

Rachel Walker
Rachel Walker
Reps: 60
I agree with many other people that you should speak with the parents in person versus alternate forms of communication. Before I went and spoke with the parents though, I would have a conversation with the counselor and possibly with others (personally friends) about how to approach the subject without seeming insensitive. It is a hard thing to address, and it has nothing to do with being a novice teacher. I would also suggest talking to the students who are doing the bullying and talk with them about how hygiene and other habits/customs vary from culture to culture. If they are made aware of how rude and insensitive they are being then the bullying could possibly lessen or stop altogether.
Votes: +0 / -0 Vote Up This Solution Is Useful   Vote Down This Solution Is Not Useful  

Comments posted for this solution

Sara LeClair
Sara LeClair
Reps: 68

I do think that face-to-face communication builds better relationships than a note sent home to the parents. The parents may appreciate a side conversation about the issue when they pick their child up from school or maybe even a phone call. I think you brought up a great point I didn't think of when I first posted about talking with the other students who are picking on him. You should discuss with them that we have cultural differences and sometimes you just have to accept people for who they are and not judge them for being different. You may want to even contact the other students' parents and let them know about the situation. This could cut down on the bullying as well.
  Posted on: June 3, 2014 6:28 pm

Reply Add a Comment
 
     
     
 
Solution 88
Posted June 3, 2014 11:41 pm

Elizabeth Comella
Elizabeth Comella
Reps: 51
First, I would talk to my school counselor. This would allow me to simply let the counselor know yes, you are aware of the child's cultural background but the order of the child has been continuous. I would have kept a record of the number of days, what the smell smells like (body odor, urine, etc.). I would let the counselor know that the order is now causing a huge disturbance in my classroom setting and negatively impacting the educational learning occurring as the students are now becoming more consumed with the body odor of the child because it is so fowl and so strong, the students are now criticizing the child, making fun of him, and that there has been constant negativity occurring between the rest of the class. I would be personally worried about the hygiene and cleanliness of the child and whether or not those important life factors are being reinforced at home.

From this point I would talk to the class about hygiene, and how their bodies are changing. I would remind them to take daily showers and use deodorant and other person care products. If the smell continued I would have the counselor talk with the child in an individual counseling session, just reinforcing the importance of cleanliness, daily baths, brushing teeth, etc. While it is important to respect the culture of others, it is also important to make sure the child is not being neglected at home. It is the responsibility of the teacher to make sure that the students are being cared for at home. If the teacher feels that the student is not receiving the proper care it needs to be reported to the counselor, documented, and a follow up done to the parents.
Elizabeth Comella
Votes: +0 / -0 Vote Up This Solution Is Useful   Vote Down This Solution Is Not Useful  

Comments posted for this solution

Reply Add a Comment
 
     
     
 
Solution 89
Posted June 5, 2014 4:20 am

Nick Hanna
Nick Hanna
Reps: 71
Setting up a parent conference to inform the parents and students of the situation that is taking place at school, would be a great idea, but first talk to the student's other teachers. When you talk to the other teachers, you will find out if the student has the smell all day long, towards the end, or only at certain times during the day. I had a student this past year that was a prime example of a student that had a bad smell in some classes, but in others, the teachers never noticed. After his teachers sat down and talked, we found out he had the bad smell right after connections, which was PE and his body odor was the culprit for the problem. Since we discussed as group before the confrontation, it helped us narrow down where the issue was coming from. Our follow step was to inform tht counselor about what was going on and she took care of it from there and it was a smooth solution. This is not the case in all "smelly kid" situations, but it should always be the first step to help narrow down what the causes of the smell are coming from.
Votes: +0 / -0 Vote Up This Solution Is Useful   Vote Down This Solution Is Not Useful  

Comments posted for this solution

Hannah Nabors
Hannah Nabors
Reps: 68
Nick,
Great detective work! I hadn't thought of the smell being related to certain daily activities, I just assumed it was all day. It will certainly be much easier to address if you can isolate the cause or triggering event. It could also be less obvious in other classrooms, based on their environmental set up. Speaking with other teachers would allow you to learn how they minimize the smell. Be careful though, that talking with the other teachers is a constructive activity.
  Posted on: June 6, 2014 12:29 am

Reply Add a Comment
 
     
     
 
Solution 90
Posted June 5, 2014 8:28 pm

Hannah Nabors
Hannah Nabors
Reps: 68
There are a couple of things at play here that you could address. First, it sounds like the other students are aware of the smell and have begun making fun of him for it. Though from other culture, I'm sure the boy is aware of this sudden change in peer interaction. He may realize the concern and work with his parents to address it before you ever mention it. If not, I would try to alleviate the issue first. Perhaps changing the seating chart, opening a window, using a scented plug-in, etc. You can also contact the school nurse or counselor for some additional strategies. At the elementary level, children are always going to be brutally honest with one another, so I'm sure he will not be the only one teased. A class unit on health and hygiene may be a general way to address the classroom odor. You are right, though, to be mindful of how you approach the subject with his parents. This is especially true as it is a cultural issue.
Votes: +0 / -0 Vote Up This Solution Is Useful   Vote Down This Solution Is Not Useful  

Comments posted for this solution

RuXuqe
RuXuqe
Reps: 67
The idea of a hygiene unit is a good one. It's not out of place in an Elementary class (I think every year my school as a child had a day on learning to brush your teeth) and would probably help the student understand hygiene from an American perspective.
  Posted on: June 7, 2015 1:59 pm

Reply Add a Comment
 
     
     
 
Solution 91
Posted June 7, 2014 2:31 pm

Tiffany Parker
Tiffany Parker
Reps: 69
I think this would be a great time to discuss cultures and their similarities and differences. I might get my students to complete short projects where they research different cultures. This could possibly explain to the students why the students smells the way he does. I would also talk to the parents and explain that I am not meaning to be disrespectful toward their culture; however, I do not want this issue to effect their son's emotional state at school.
Votes: +0 / -0 Vote Up This Solution Is Useful   Vote Down This Solution Is Not Useful  

Comments posted for this solution

PyveDu
PyveDu
Reps: 101
I like the idea of completing projects of their cultures. This is very neat to explain to others how we are similar and very much different at the same time. In providing a safe environment for our children it is great that others can have an idea of how we each live outside of our classroom walls.
  Posted on: October 19, 2014 2:43 pm

Reply Add a Comment
 
     
     
 
Solution 92
Posted June 8, 2014 8:09 pm

Cierra` Barksdale
Cierra` Barksdale
Reps: 61
I would address this issue by having a face-to-face conversation with the parents first. I would express my concerns and allow them to give me insight and inform me if it was truly cultural. Next, I would have a conversation with my entire class about different cultural and how we all practice and believe different things. I would put my students into groups and allow them to do projects on different cultures point out specific point, one which would be hygiene. Lastly, I would explain to the students how it is not nice to talk badly about someone and I would make connections to the various cultures and how we all do not do everyday life things the same.
Votes: +0 / -0 Vote Up This Solution Is Useful   Vote Down This Solution Is Not Useful  

Comments posted for this solution

HyraLe
HyraLe
Reps: 73
I agree that having a conversation with the entire class would be helpful. Some students may not understand the difference in cultures and what is important in some cultures aren't as important as others. Definitely if the students are old enough to understand then a discussion should take place about this. Otherwise, they will continue to do so and pick on the other student.
  Posted on: December 1, 2014 4:45 am

Reply Add a Comment
 
     
     
 
Solution 93
Posted June 9, 2014 3:54 pm

aBugeS
aBugeS
Reps: 77
I have had smelly students in my class before. Normally, it does not become a problem for the classroom unless it is really bad. I personally avoid the issue in order not to shame the student. This is a different situation however because the child is being picked on. I think it would be important for you to get the administration involved and have a parent conference. Explain to the parents why the child is being picked on. The parents may decide to encourage the child to bath more so that he will not be picked on or isolated. If the child's odor is becoming a distraction in the classroom than the parents need to know. It is not good to avoid an awkward situation with parents because what may start as a small problem can escalate quickly.
Votes: +0 / -0 Vote Up This Solution Is Useful   Vote Down This Solution Is Not Useful  

Comments posted for this solution

ezyHes
ezyHes
Reps: 101
Something to think about.
  Posted on: March 7, 2016 1:45 am

Reply Add a Comment
 
     
     
 
Solution 94
Posted June 13, 2014 3:14 pm

Nick Thrower
Nick Thrower
Reps: 67
Communicating face-to-face is essential here. A conference needs to be set up with the parents. While you may be worried about disrespectful towards their culture, the kids are being more disrespectful. You may find out that it's something simple like the parents didn't know about his problem. Clear communication is important so you may want to write down exactly what it is you are communicating.
Votes: +0 / -0 Vote Up This Solution Is Useful   Vote Down This Solution Is Not Useful  

Comments posted for this solution

Reply Add a Comment
 
     
     
 
Solution 95
Posted October 19, 2014 2:41 pm

PyveDu
PyveDu
Reps: 101
As a kindergarten teacher, we do promote healthy strategies as a unit in our curriculum. We speak about brushing our teeth, taking care of our body, and healthy foods to eat. This is just a good lesson for all children to have. In this certain situation I would send the child to the counselors office. Our counselor at our school really has different strategies for learning a more in depth knowledge of situations without coming straight out to ask: Do you take showers at home? She would have the child draw pictures or play games regarding what their routines are at home. As a class we promote a "family" like environment. I understand this is from a young age group that I work with, but kids can be cruel to others and we want all of our students to come to school without fear and anxiety.
Votes: +0 / -0 Vote Up This Solution Is Useful   Vote Down This Solution Is Not Useful  

Comments posted for this solution

BazaNu
BazaNu
Reps: 89
I like involving the school counselor but instead of singling one student out for "questioning", I might ask the counselor to do a lesson for the entire class on hygiene and home routines.
  Posted on: October 27, 2014 4:44 pm

Reply Add a Comment
 
     
     
 
Solution 96
Posted October 20, 2014 7:28 pm

April Rozier
April Rozier
Reps: 110
You should contact the parents to see if they would come in for a conference. Have the guidance counselor attend the conference so that you will have a witness to the meeting. You should simply explain that you are unfamiliar with their cultural beliefs and you do not want to offend them but you are concerned about their child's emotional well-being. Inform the parents that other students are making fun of their child because of the way he smells. Explain that in the American culture, body odor is considered offensive and the students are reacting to what they have been taught. Discuss ways of handling the situation with the parents so you are certain not to offend them.
Votes: +0 / -0 Vote Up This Solution Is Useful   Vote Down This Solution Is Not Useful  

Comments posted for this solution

Reply Add a Comment
 
     
     
 
Solution 97
Posted October 21, 2014 8:13 pm

SaSyXu
SaSyXu
Reps: 105
I think that I would start by sending a letter home to the parents. I would include that you understand that it may be a part of their culture, but you are concerned about how their child is being treated by other students who do not understand the cultural differences.
Votes: +0 / -0 Vote Up This Solution Is Useful   Vote Down This Solution Is Not Useful  

Comments posted for this solution

Reply Add a Comment
 
     
     
 
Solution 98
Posted October 22, 2014 6:55 pm

aHeRaL
aHeRaL
Reps: 112
This type of situation can be a major classroom distraction (both for the new student and the students in the classroom) and there is the added issue of the new student's feeling. As such, resolving this issue requires tact and sensitivity. The best approach would be to have a conference with the parents about the situation, explaining that the odor is strong and is becoming a distraction in the classroom. Coming from Eastern Europe, I am sure the parents understand hygiene, so that conversation is not necessary, but the circumstances of American climate and culture are different, and to help the student transition into the classroom more easily, it would be helpful if the student bathed on a more frequent basis. I imagine the parents would be understanding and willing to help their child in this particular situation.
Votes: +0 / -0 Vote Up This Solution Is Useful   Vote Down This Solution Is Not Useful  

Comments posted for this solution

zuPeQy
zuPeQy
Reps: 99
I agree that this situation can be a disruption to the class. I think it is cool that you are from Eastern Europe and know things about their culture. I agree that they do not need the talk about hygiene but you're right about the climate being different. I think the parents would understand if they were confronted and willing to help in whatever way possible. I would be a tad nervous about offending them but I would imagine their child's feelings and emotions would be a priority.
  Posted on: October 22, 2014 10:07 pm

Reply Add a Comment
 
     
     
 
Solution 99
Posted October 22, 2014 10:02 pm

zuPeQy
zuPeQy
Reps: 99
This is a really touchy subject. On one hand, bringing the parents in on the situation would allow them to know that their child is being picked on due to his body odor. At the same time they could take offense to that and not change anything at home because that is culturally acceptable for them. I would want to see what other teachers said about the situation or even the principal. It is important to get other peoples opinions. I would also make it known to the class that everyone is different and come from all walks of life and it is unacceptable to treat others disrespectfully because they are different.
Votes: +0 / -0 Vote Up This Solution Is Useful   Vote Down This Solution Is Not Useful  

Comments posted for this solution

Reply Add a Comment
 
     
     
 
Solution 100
Posted October 24, 2014 11:33 pm

egyveW
egyveW
Reps: 103
I would first ask the counselor about any background information that she has on the student and whether or not the parents have said anything about him being teased in the past. This would give me an idea of whether or not the parents were aware of the situation. It may be that this is just a phase the child is going through. Doing this would at least give me an opportunity to make the counselor aware of the situation as I set out to contact the parents. I also think that making sure that the adults on campus know what is going on could help in assisting with making sure that other students do not tease him. After I had done those things, I would carefully contact the parents, and I would hope that they could come in for a conference because I would rather have the conversation in person.
Votes: +0 / -0 Vote Up This Solution Is Useful   Vote Down This Solution Is Not Useful  

Comments posted for this solution

Reply Add a Comment
 
     
     
 
Solution 101
Posted October 25, 2014 1:53 pm

yXeBeX
yXeBeX
Reps: 114
I think this is an issue that the counselor should be handling. Since the student is new, she could call a meeting with the parents to see how everything is going and how they think their child is adjusting to the new school. In this conference the parents may possible bring up the fact that their child is having difficulty making friends or that he feels other children are picking on him. this would be a perfect opportunity for the counselor to being up the body odor issue and give the parents some suggestions to remedy the problem. This also will take the load off of the teacher and now make her look as if she is picking on the family or their culture.
Votes: +0 / -0 Vote Up This Solution Is Useful   Vote Down This Solution Is Not Useful  

Comments posted for this solution

Reply Add a Comment
 
     
     
 
Solution 102
Posted October 25, 2014 4:34 pm

aQazuV
aQazuV
Reps: 105
This is an uncomfortable situation and teaching fifth grade, I have had to have the "body odor" discussion with my students. Usually, I would suggest having a discussion with the whole class about hygiene and the importance of taking care of yourself however, since the students are already making fun of the student, they will know who your lesson is directed at. I suggest that you hold a conference with the student's parents. The parents will be accepting and willing to help if they know that their child is being made fun of. Make sure that you let the parents know you are concerned about their child and care about their academic success. I would also punish the children who are ridiculing the student because that should also be addressed. If the parents are not receptive and find as if you are being disrespectful towards their culture, I would then seek help from administration.
Votes: +0 / -0 Vote Up This Solution Is Useful   Vote Down This Solution Is Not Useful  

Comments posted for this solution

Reply Add a Comment
 
     
     
 
Solution 103
Posted October 26, 2014 5:46 pm

NyVyTy
NyVyTy
Reps: 90
My advice to you would be to continue to monitor the situation. I would speak to all of the students to remind them to treat others in the same manner they wish to be treated. I definitely would not initially say anything to the parents because they could very well take your concern out of context and become offended. If the situation worsens as you continue to monitor it, then I would carefully approach the parents. In approaching them, I would simply ask them to share some things about their culture, and in turn I'd share some things about US culture. Considering that the father of the student works as a professional at a local university, he should be able to handle the information and understand why your explanation of the information given was important.
Votes: +0 / -0 Vote Up This Solution Is Useful   Vote Down This Solution Is Not Useful  

Comments posted for this solution

Reply Add a Comment
 
     
     
 
Solution 104
Posted October 27, 2014 2:31 am

aheduX
aheduX
Reps: 112
It is sad with I see students picking on each other about things such as this. I would send home a respectable letter to his parents about the situation. I would also ask the parents if they would like to meet and discuss the issue. I would definitely let the parents understand that their culture is very important and that I would understand completely. In addition, I would tell the parents that the students are making fun of their son because of his odor. I would not want this to occur because they have a very bright student and would not want anything to inhibit his learning. I would not want the teasing to cause him to be distracted from learning and grow angry.


Votes: +0 / -0 Vote Up This Solution Is Useful   Vote Down This Solution Is Not Useful  

Comments posted for this solution

BazaNu
BazaNu
Reps: 89
I would be hesitant about sending a letter home. I think in this situation, it could very easily escalate. Instead I would talk with my class about not picking on someone for being different. No specifics have to be mentioned, just a reminder that no matter the differences you should treat your peers kindly.
  Posted on: October 27, 2014 4:42 pm

Whitney Johnson
Whitney Johnson
Reps: 97
I also think that a letter home might worsen the situation. I think a meeting with the parents would be the best way to go in this situation. Or, perhaps, there could be a "health" class to help teach the children how to take care of themselves.
  Posted on: November 3, 2014 1:58 am

Reply Add a Comment
 
     
     
 
Solution 105
Posted October 27, 2014 3:01 am

Kim Lucas
Kim Lucas
Reps: 107
I believe there are many things that must be done to handle this type of situation. I would begin by speaking to the parents and asking them in for a conference, where I would definitely tell them that I want to honor their cultural beliefs, but that due to the other students reactions and the cultural beliefs here in America, it is causing distress for the child. I would welcome different suggestions from the parents, but would try to help them see what it was doing to their child. I would also have a talk with the class, and attempt to open their eyes to different kinds of cultures and beliefs. But only if I sensed that I could do this without causing distress to the student.
Votes: +0 / -0 Vote Up This Solution Is Useful   Vote Down This Solution Is Not Useful  

Comments posted for this solution

HyraLe
HyraLe
Reps: 73
Anytime you are dealing with an issue like this you have to be sensitive about the situation not to offend anyone. I agree with you about speaking with them because they need to know what's happening and what's going on. The student is the one suffering in this case and if something is not said, he could have some long term emotional issues and this could also affect his grades. I agree that this issue definitely needs to be addressed.
  Posted on: December 1, 2014 4:47 am

Reply Add a Comment
 
     
     
 
Solution 106
Posted October 27, 2014 3:37 am

Jordan Nelms
Jordan Nelms
Reps: 104
My first step would probably be to schedule a conference with his parents to make sure they were aware of the problem. Before discussing the problem, I would share some positive information with the parents first, such as how well the student is doing in participation. If, like you said, it is something that is culturally acceptable in their country, I would respectfully explain to them, that the body odor is causing the student to be picked on by other students. I would also reiterate to the parents that I would not allow him to be picked on as long as I could help it, but sometimes, we aren't always with our students. I would again, tell the parents that the student is trying so hard to participate, and explain to them that the odor is hindering his participation. If this didn't help the problem, I would get my school counselor involved.
Votes: +0 / -0 Vote Up This Solution Is Useful   Vote Down This Solution Is Not Useful  

Comments posted for this solution

Reply Add a Comment
 
     
     
 
Solution 107
Posted October 27, 2014 4:20 pm

BazaNu
BazaNu
Reps: 89
It could be cultural or economical reasons (unable to afford the water bill) or something else entirely that causes this child to have body odor. My first thought is to address the issue with the class. Body odor or not, these kids should not make fun of someone for being different. They should be instructed kindly that they will see (or smell) differences in others. They should be accepting of these differences.
Votes: +0 / -0 Vote Up This Solution Is Useful   Vote Down This Solution Is Not Useful  

Comments posted for this solution

Myzusy
Myzusy
Reps: 113
I agree with your recommendation. The whole class needs to understand that regardless of body odor or anything else they can not bully each other. The child's family could be having financial difficulties that would prevent him form having water to bathe in. I would notify the family of my concerns that he's being teased due to body odor. I would also closely monitor the child for any other indications the family may need help.
  Posted on: October 28, 2014 2:07 am

Qybuse
Qybuse
Reps: 118
I appreciate your solution. Regardless of the situation, it is never okay for students to make fun of another student. I think that it is crucial for the teacher to address this with all students immediately.
  Posted on: November 2, 2015 1:35 am

Reply Add a Comment
 
     
     
 
Solution 108
Posted October 28, 2014 2:03 am

Myzusy
Myzusy
Reps: 113
The first thing that you need to do is to acknowledge that your student's body odor is a problem that is effecting his social and emotional development because he is being teased by his peers. It is good that you are being culturally sensitive to the student however, in the long run he needs to understand that he has entered a new country whose cultural norms identify cleanliness with low body odor. I would consult with the school guidance counselor and ESOL teacher to ask for their help. I would also contact the child's parents by holding a conference that included the counselor and ESOL teacher. At the meeting I would explain the concern for the child's over all social emotional development due to his strong body odor. That would help the parents understand that they may have to help their child adapt to changes in cultural norms related to body odor in order for him to not be teased at school. I would also ask the guidance counselor to present the class with a special lesson on feelings and hygiene. I would ask the ESOL teacher to present a special lesson to the class about the students culture . The lessons would help classmates to have a better understanding of how they can be friends with the new child. Helping the class learn about diversity would also help the student to become comfortable in the class.
Votes: +0 / -0 Vote Up This Solution Is Useful   Vote Down This Solution Is Not Useful  

Comments posted for this solution

Reply Add a Comment
 
     
     
 
Solution 109
Posted October 29, 2014 2:48 pm

ezasyp
ezasyp
Reps: 107
This is a situation that definitely needs to be addressed! Students can be very mean to "smelly kids" and you do not want this happening in your classroom. I would personally call the parents. You know that the dad is a professor so he should understand what it means to be professional. I am sure the dad would not go into work smelling. I understand that some cultures find it normal to not take a bath everyday but when it becomes a distraction something needs to be said. You are not trying to change the student and their cultural beliefs by no means, the topic just needs to be addressed to the parents. This situation could be the student simply refusing to shower. Communicating with the parents will be key to finding a solution to this problem. If it is strictly cultural differences I would suggest solutions. Prior to contacting the parents research the exact belief behind not showering in case that is the reason behind the student not showering. Then you can be informed on what they believe when you are suggesting ways to come up with a solution! You could also always sit him by an air freshener!
Votes: +0 / -0 Vote Up This Solution Is Useful   Vote Down This Solution Is Not Useful  

Comments posted for this solution

Reply Add a Comment
 
     
     
 
Solution 110
Posted October 29, 2014 7:56 pm

Kayla Mullins
Kayla Mullins
Reps: 89
The first thing I would do is set up a lesson that would discuss taking care of yourself. This would not only help the one particular student but also help other students in the class. During the lesson you can incorporate how the body changes as you get older and talk about the importance keeping the body clean. This will not put the focus on the new student but on all of the students. They my help the new student become aware of his personal area and realize things are differnt in locations or cultures around the world. I would also make sure to talk in private with the students who are making fun of the new student. They are possible not aware of other cultures and need to be informed.
-Kayla Mullins
Votes: +0 / -0 Vote Up This Solution Is Useful   Vote Down This Solution Is Not Useful  

Comments posted for this solution

Reply Add a Comment
 
     
     
 
Solution 111
Posted November 1, 2014 9:11 pm

LeHyZa
LeHyZa
Reps: 107
I am a novice teacher as well as I have yet to have any experience teaching. If I were in this situation I would first ask my peer teachers if they've run into this sort of situation and how did they handle it. I would weigh their opinions and then do what I felt would reflect best in the eyes of the student as well as his parents. Perhaps research the student's culture online to see if you can find out if deodorant is not commonly used or if bringing this situation up would be offensive to the family. The most important thing is for the student to feel welcome and safe in the classroom and this will not be the case if he continues to be teased. I would remind the classroom of classroom rules and that any form of bullying is not tolerated. I think an in person meeting with the parents would serve better than sending a note home. Be sure to also express to the parents how well their son is doing in the class.
Votes: +0 / -0 Vote Up This Solution Is Useful   Vote Down This Solution Is Not Useful  

Comments posted for this solution

Reply Add a Comment
 
     
     
 
Solution 112
Posted November 2, 2014 10:18 pm

GyJeWy
GyJeWy
Reps: 105
You could always set up a meeting and just explain what was happening. If the parents see that you are trying to protect their child and only looking out for what is best for him they are probably less likely to be offended.
Votes: +0 / -0 Vote Up This Solution Is Useful   Vote Down This Solution Is Not Useful  

Comments posted for this solution

Reply Add a Comment
 
     
     
 
Solution 113
Posted November 3, 2014 1:48 am

Whitney Johnson
Whitney Johnson
Reps: 97
This situation is a common situation that occurs in all classrooms regardless of a child's culture. I have had this exact problem in the classroom before with a fifteen-year-old teenager. This particular teenager did not wish to shower nor did the parents promote showering. In cases like mine and the one above, I think the best outlet a teacher can take is going to the guidance counselor whereupon they contact the family, and bring them in to talk. The counselor may have one or two teachers present as well. It is also to be suggested that in no way is the meeting meant to dishonor their culture; however, they are now living in a new culture and should not want their child to suffer the repercussions in the classrooms due to lack of understanding of new culture.
Votes: +0 / -0 Vote Up This Solution Is Useful   Vote Down This Solution Is Not Useful  

Comments posted for this solution

Reply Add a Comment
 
     
     
 
Solution 114
Posted November 3, 2014 4:49 am

HaBuMu
HaBuMu
Reps: 52
I would suggest a Parent-Teacher Meeting. This would ensure that the parents would understand that you are not trying to seem culturally disrespectful. Explain to the parents that you are able to deal with whatever choice they make, but that their son is being made of fun in his school environment. Also explain that the closer their son gets to puberty, the more likely it is for him to smell and encounter this problem at school. After discussion with the parents, ask them if they want to talk to their son privately or if they want to invite him to the meeting to discuss it as a group. This will let the parents know that you are a team and want to work together to do what is best for their son.
Votes: +0 / -0 Vote Up This Solution Is Useful   Vote Down This Solution Is Not Useful  

Comments posted for this solution

Reply Add a Comment
 
     
     
 
Solution 115
Posted February 20, 2015 5:37 pm

SeguHu
SeguHu
Reps: 96
I would recommend you discuss it with the parents. Inform them that it is having an affect on his social interactions at school.
Votes: +0 / -0 Vote Up This Solution Is Useful   Vote Down This Solution Is Not Useful  

Comments posted for this solution

Reply Add a Comment
 
     
     
 
Solution 116
Posted February 26, 2015 5:08 pm

yGyPaZ
yGyPaZ
Reps: 101
I would try incorporating a lesson on hygiene and why it's important to take care of your body.
If that doesn't solve the problem you are definitely going to have to set up a conference with the parents to discuss the behavior of the other children in your class towards him as well, while being respectful.
Votes: +0 / -0 Vote Up This Solution Is Useful   Vote Down This Solution Is Not Useful  

Comments posted for this solution

Reply Add a Comment
 
     
     
 
Solution 117
Posted March 10, 2015 12:51 pm

yPyjeW
yPyjeW
Reps: 104
Honestly, I don't feel like you're being disrespectful by letting the parents know and asking if you can assist. However, I would inquire with the school counselor or social worker prior to communicating with the parents. There are many illnesses and diseases that can cause body odor. And some allergies that prevent wearing deodorant. So the counselor can make you aware of any of these issues before you contact the parents. And of course, when you do contact the parents, be kind and willing to help if needed. It sounds like you do care tremendously about the child or this wouldn't be bothering you.
Votes: +0 / -0 Vote Up This Solution Is Useful   Vote Down This Solution Is Not Useful  

Comments posted for this solution

ynyqaz
ynyqaz
Reps: 64
i think contacting parents is a good start as well. I have found in my years of teaching that open communication is important and is often respected by your students parents.
  Posted on: June 5, 2015 5:30 pm

Reply Add a Comment
 
     
     
 
Solution 118
Posted March 11, 2015 11:37 pm

aNuLyB
aNuLyB
Reps: 102
Honestly, I would not even tell the student, I would tell the parents. I would explain the situation to the parents and you are trying to protect their child. No matter what the culture is, a child still has feelings that can be hurt. As a teacher, it is our responsibility to make sure our students are not bullied. I would also let the Guidance Counselor know and he or she may have some useful suggestions.
Votes: +0 / -0 Vote Up This Solution Is Useful   Vote Down This Solution Is Not Useful  

Comments posted for this solution

Ashley Lawrence
Ashley Lawrence
Reps: 70
The only problem with telling the parents, is they can direct anger towards you as the teacher. You definitely want to let the counselor know and the administrator. Let them handle the situation correctly.
  Posted on: June 1, 2015 4:37 pm

Edward Kim
Edward Kim
Reps: 106
I think it would be odd and the parents might get more offended if a counselor or an administrator was the ones to talk to them about the issue and not the teacher who spends 7+ hours with their child everyday. I think it would be nice and helpful if you had a counselor or administrator there for support but the concern should come from the teacher. It shows that the teacher cares and wants what is best for the student. Plus if the parent does get mad you will have more people there to support you.
  Posted on: October 23, 2015 7:49 pm

Reply Add a Comment
 
     
     
 
Solution 119
Posted June 1, 2015 4:25 pm

uqeXun
uqeXun
Reps: 69
I think you should begin by conducting several science/health lessons about personal hygiene with the entire class. They all will benefit. All kids come in smelling after recess. Emphasize that as young people develop and grow into their adult bodies, it's important to be understand the changes and how to take care of it. Also point out that just as getting dressed in the morning is something they do without being told, personal hygiene is now responsibility they should assume on their own. Cute video clips are available on YouTube and Pinterest. Cultural diversity lessons may be beneficial as well. Simultaneously taught, students would learn that hygiene habits of other cultures are not wrong, just different. If the lessons alone don't provide the desired outcome, then I would seek advice from the nurse, the counselor, administrators, or others that might offer valuable insight and suggestions.
Votes: +0 / -0 Vote Up This Solution Is Useful   Vote Down This Solution Is Not Useful  

Comments posted for this solution

Reply Add a Comment
 
     
     
 
Solution 120
Posted June 1, 2015 8:26 pm

jamasy
jamasy
Reps: 67
I think the only acceptable thing to do in this situation would be to have a meeting with the parents to discuss the situation. Te students do not know what might be culturally acceptable in Eastern Europe but making fun of someone is never acceptable. I would follow disciplinary procedures for bullying to combat this situation. At the parent conference, I would let the parents know what is going on and allow them to decide what they think is appropriate as a response. This way I am not coming across like I am insensitive to their culture.
Votes: +0 / -0 Vote Up This Solution Is Useful   Vote Down This Solution Is Not Useful  

Comments posted for this solution

Paige Lutes
Paige Lutes
Reps: 64
Sometimes a good way to handle the situation is to address it head on. I would hope that the parents would be understanding and not take it to be negative or embarrassing!
  Posted on: June 2, 2015 3:16 am

zyzaSy
zyzaSy
Reps: 68
You provided a different perspective when you said you would let the parents come up with the solutions, but I think it is an excellent idea. Who better to generate a solution to the problem than those within the culture. An excellent perspective.
  Posted on: June 8, 2015 6:19 am

Reply Add a Comment
 
     
     
 
Solution 121
Posted June 2, 2015 1:07 am

avuNaD
avuNaD
Reps: 36
I think that this situation can be handled a variety of ways. If the class is filled with older students like in the 4th or 5th grade I would have the personal talk about having good hygiene. If you yourself do not feel comfortable I am sure your school counselor would be willing to have the talk with them. At this age I think that it is common because their bodies are changing. If the student is younger then I strongly recommend having a conference. I think talking to the child about it may be over stepping and the student could take it the wrong way and go home and tell his parents. I think having them come in and have a face to face meeting about the issue is a lot better because they can share some light on what their culture might believe and you could shed some light in how it is affecting the class as well as him personally. I also think that it is imperative no matter what the age of students to talk to students about bullying and making good choice.
Votes: +0 / -0 Vote Up This Solution Is Useful   Vote Down This Solution Is Not Useful  

Comments posted for this solution

Paige Lutes
Paige Lutes
Reps: 64
Your post sounded like mine. I didn't even think about getting the counselor involved. I know the counselors at my school have deodorant and other hygiene products to give out. That would be a great way to help the student in a tangible way, too!
  Posted on: June 2, 2015 3:14 am

Kalie Walker
Kalie Walker
Reps: 66
This solution was my second option. I think having a class conversation would be typically normal for this age group about good hygiene since like you said their bodies are changing. There are several options to go about giving this lecture either by ones self or asking the counselor or even the school nurse to help out. Great post!
  Posted on: June 2, 2015 3:08 pm

Reply Add a Comment
 
     
     
 
Solution 122
Posted June 2, 2015 3:05 am

Paige Lutes
Paige Lutes
Reps: 64
I think that one solution could be discussing cultures. There could be mini lessons about different cultures and their customs. One of the lessons can be on hygiene. This can give the teacher the opportunity to educate the child on US customs about hygiene. This would be a tasteful way to educate her American students about other cultures hygiene while exposing the European student to American customs.
Votes: +0 / -0 Vote Up This Solution Is Useful   Vote Down This Solution Is Not Useful  

Comments posted for this solution

Kalie Walker
Kalie Walker
Reps: 66
I like this idea of giving a lesson on cultures. I never thought about it but the way you explained it makes it sound like it would be a good solution and not over step any boundaries with the student or his parents.
  Posted on: June 2, 2015 3:10 pm

Reply Add a Comment
 
     
     
 
Solution 123
Posted June 2, 2015 3:37 am

vabehe
vabehe
Reps: 69
I would definitely ask his parents to come in for a face to face meeting. The child's feelings should be the greatest consideration and a note home might not be interpreted correctly. At the meeting I would lead off by emphasizing that the student was bright and eager to learn and participate. I would also let the parents know that he was integrating well into our classroom, but that I had a concern. I would want to make sure that they knew I valued and understood their culture and that I respected them as a family, but that he had been teased at school because of his smell. I would try to explain that most students in our school bathed daily and so to them, this smell was unpleasant and not something they were used to. I don't think I would tell the parents what to do, but let them have all of the information and then make a decision that they feel is best for them. Hopefully they would want him to be accepted in class and not be teased, but if they chose not to make him conform to the norms in the new culture, then maybe I would pull those students aside, who are teasing and explain to them what is going on. I wouldn't want to call attention to it in front of the class. Hopefully this would resolve the situation.
Votes: +0 / -0 Vote Up This Solution Is Useful   Vote Down This Solution Is Not Useful  

Comments posted for this solution

Reply Add a Comment
 
     
     
 
Solution 124
Posted June 2, 2015 3:05 pm

Kalie Walker
Kalie Walker
Reps: 66
I think the best way to approach this situation to cause the least amount of disrespect is to talk to the child first. Ask him about his cultural background and how they feel about personal hygiene without making him feel you are attacking him. He may say that they have a view on showering that it is not that important or he may open up to you about how his home life is not that great and they don't have running water. If that is the case, then intervening would ne necessary but if his families views on showering are not important, then I feel it should be left alone. You never know until you talk with him.
Votes: +0 / -0 Vote Up This Solution Is Useful   Vote Down This Solution Is Not Useful  

Comments posted for this solution

Reply Add a Comment
 
     
     
 
Solution 125
Posted June 2, 2015 3:21 pm

Monica Rainwater
Monica Rainwater
Reps: 71
This is a very sensitive situation, and this situation has actually happened multiple times in our school system. This is the perfect opportunity to invite the school counselor in to complete her health and wellness portion of the curriculum to the students. The program that our school uses actually hands out tangible items to each students as a hands-on "tool" for the class. The item that is handed out is deodorant, and we make sure to make a big deal about how clean and good it smells. The response we have received from this program has been quite positive, and most cultures have been open to the discussion. What I have found with most of the immigrants that I have taught, they don't want to "stick out" or bring attention to themselves. Sometimes, because it isn't as important in their culture, they just aren't aware of it. Just a simple lesson can make the all the difference in the world.
Votes: +0 / -0 Vote Up This Solution Is Useful   Vote Down This Solution Is Not Useful  

Comments posted for this solution

vasere
vasere
Reps: 70
This sounds like a good curriculum. Maybe you do this already, but I would be sure to send information about this course home to parents. This way, if the student comes home with seemingly strange ideas, the parents will know where they came from. This would also be an opportunity for the parents to learn more about hygiene. Getting everyone excited about this seems like it is working well at your school!
  Posted on: June 3, 2015 3:08 am

Reply Add a Comment
 
     
     
 
Solution 126
Posted June 2, 2015 10:46 pm

Amanda Morris
Amanda Morris
Reps: 70
I believe that I would first start out on a unit on personal hygiene. Let the students know how important it is to take care of our body. This way I am addressing the whole class and not singling out that particular students. If that didn't work then I may contact the parents and let them know of the situation that is occurring in the classroom. I would try to word it where I did not offend them and their culture. I would make sure that I let them know that you are looking out for the well-being of their child and that he was getting pick on because of his personal hygiene.
Votes: +0 / -0 Vote Up This Solution Is Useful   Vote Down This Solution Is Not Useful  

Comments posted for this solution

Reply Add a Comment
 
     
     
 
Solution 127
Posted June 3, 2015 1:22 am

Nicole Turner
Nicole Turner
Reps: 70
I believe that going to the parents in a way that the focus is strictly on the students and his best interest within the classroom would be the best option for this situation. You would be able to address it to them in a respectful manner and keep the focus on how this is going to help benefit the students and make him perform and well as achieve socially within the classroom. If you explain this and how in our culture it is a bit different than I believe that the parents will respond positively as long as the conversation stays focused on the child rather than the culture.
Votes: +0 / -0 Vote Up This Solution Is Useful   Vote Down This Solution Is Not Useful  

Comments posted for this solution

Reply Add a Comment
 
     
     
 
Solution 128
Posted June 3, 2015 1:33 am

aQanaD
aQanaD
Reps: 67
I would first of all just have a face to face with the parents. THe purpose of the meeting shouldn't be, "your child stinks." Use the meeting as an opportunity to really get to know the parents and the culture. There is likely a lot to be learned anyway. Then, a door will likely open in casual conversation about what to expect here in the US or in the classroom. This could easily come up in conversation as a noticeable difference between the cultures. If the problem did not get better, I would suggest being more forward the next time around. The teacher should be very upfront and handle any comments from classmates about the smells. I would suggest that a hygiene lesson would be very beneficial for the entire class. At this age, there are many students who are oblivious to hygiene issues. I would not give this lesson until I felt that the "smelly kid" situation was handled, as I would not want to create a scene. If I am smelling the kid, I am sure that his classmates smell him too. Talking about the pink elephant in the room, without addressing the actual problem, only could promote more picking or uncomfortableness.
Votes: +0 / -0 Vote Up This Solution Is Useful   Vote Down This Solution Is Not Useful  

Comments posted for this solution

yzaSeR
yzaSeR
Reps: 68
I think a face to face meeting is a better idea. That way you can read the body language of the parents and hopefully know if you are offending them.
  Posted on: June 3, 2015 1:35 pm

Reply Add a Comment
 
     
     
 
Solution 129
Posted June 3, 2015 3:05 am

vasere
vasere
Reps: 70
This is difficult. And I will admit, body odor is a "pet peeve" of mine, but I would certainly still try to be gracious. First, I would address the rest of the class (when this student is not present). Tell them they are being inconsiderate and ungracious. Remind them instead that they should work to speak only kind words to one another. You cannot tell your students that there is no smell, but you can remind them that everyone has body odor, and it is not something we should call attention to.
As for addressing the smell, I would certainly do some research. I would learn more about his culture and how such a request may be perceived. I would also talk to the guidance counselor to see if they have any advice. Otherwise, I would try to speak to this student, just in general and in private, about their daily routine. Once learning about his habits, perhaps talk about other kinds of habits, ones that include washing hands and bathing regularly. This may be enough for him to ask questions. If not, you may need to humbly talk to his parents about hygiene in your classroom. Let them know that he is doing well in the classroom, but that his hygiene has caused him to be the target of ridicule. This is not to excuse other students, but it may help his parents see why this would help him. If, for some reason, the parents are ok with him bathing more but do not have the means for him to do so, perhaps he can shower at school if there are locker rooms.
Votes: +0 / -0 Vote Up This Solution Is Useful   Vote Down This Solution Is Not Useful  

Comments posted for this solution

ReMuXy
ReMuXy
Reps: 78
I like your idea about talking to the individual student privately. Maybe he is unaware of what is going on. I don't think I would talk to the class individually without him due to privacy issues and you don't want something going back to the child.
  Posted on: June 3, 2015 3:51 pm

Reply Add a Comment
 
     
     
 
Solution 130
Posted June 3, 2015 1:33 pm

yzaSeR
yzaSeR
Reps: 68
I would contact the parents and have them meet with you to discuss what is going on. I think a face to face meeting may go over a lot better than just a note home. If you explain to them that other students are being mean to their child they may be more inclined to want to change what is going on. Maybe part of the student's daily routine is to go into the bathroom to apply deodorant in the morning. This can be done first thing to avoid other students making a scene or disturbing the class in any way.
Votes: +0 / -0 Vote Up This Solution Is Useful   Vote Down This Solution Is Not Useful  

Comments posted for this solution

zyzaSy
zyzaSy
Reps: 68
I agree with you that this matter requires a face to face meeting. I do not think a note home would be appropriate at all. I like that you suggest providing the student with an 'at school' routine. This is particularly important for young children, such as elementary students.
  Posted on: June 8, 2015 6:15 am

Reply Add a Comment
 
     
     
 
Solution 131
Posted June 3, 2015 2:57 pm

TyhyMa
TyhyMa
Reps: 84
If I were the teacher I would do a classroom activity that involved all of the students. We would all discuss hygiene. I am sure he is not the only student that needs a refresher on hygiene. When children are young they don't always care about hygiene, and I think that with/without a problem it should be discussed. I would also consider bringing in a guest speaker about hygiene. I know that when I was in middle school we had a guest speaker come in and talk to every class about personal hygiene. The speaker was very interesting, and talked to everyone as a whole not just one person. No one was embarrassed, and could openly ask questions. We all felt as if we were on the same level, and were all learning the same thing because of the same reasons. No one felt weird. I do not think that a teacher just address the student about his hygiene problems in front of the other kids, or single him out. I think that would be an awful experience for the child.
Votes: +0 / -0 Vote Up This Solution Is Useful   Vote Down This Solution Is Not Useful  

Comments posted for this solution

ynyqaz
ynyqaz
Reps: 64
A hygiene unit is a good idea. This would not single any student out and it would also open a door of communication with the child's parents about any cultural differences they may have.
  Posted on: June 5, 2015 5:32 pm

Reply Add a Comment
 
     
     
 
Solution 132
Posted June 3, 2015 9:03 pm

deTusa
deTusa
Reps: 74
This would be a tough situation for me as well. I have traveled to Europe on multiple occasions and this was something that I noticed as well. They do not consider deodorant and cologne / perfume to be a good thing in certain areas in Europe. Being that I was in their country, I knew it was just a difference in culture and that they simply did things differently. Yes the smell did bother me, but I knew it was just based on where we were from as to what was considered ďsmelly.Ē I think I would try and somehow educate the other students about the differences in culture and that in some places things were done differentlyÖlike with the deodorant and lack of showers, etc. I would also talk to the student individually and talk to him about these differences. I would not pressure him one way or another. I would not try and embarrass him or talk bad about his culture. I would just teach him about how itís done here and let him make his own decision. He could make the decision as to whether he could stand up for himself and tell others why he does what he does, or he could change the way he does things in that department and do things more like others in his class. I would leave the decision up to him though.
Votes: +0 / -0 Vote Up This Solution Is Useful   Vote Down This Solution Is Not Useful  

Comments posted for this solution

Reply Add a Comment
 
     
     
 
Solution 133
Posted June 3, 2015 10:25 pm

Tina Joiner
Tina Joiner
Reps: 63
I think the first way to solve the problem is to have a face to face parent conference with the child at the meeting as well. It would be helpful to have a compare/contrast diagram of hygiene beliefs from Eastern Europe versus the hygiene beliefs in America and discuss how the child is being effected in the classroom. If the parents care about their child, they will have the child start showering on a daily basis. There is also a human growth and development video that many elementary schools show to students about hygiene as well. The local WellStar hospitals also have a program where people come out to talk to classes and give goody bags to kids that contain deodorant, etc.
Votes: +0 / -0 Vote Up This Solution Is Useful   Vote Down This Solution Is Not Useful  

Comments posted for this solution

Reply Add a Comment
 
     
     
 
Solution 134
Posted June 4, 2015 4:16 am

Chris Clark
Chris Clark
Reps: 70
I think that a face-to-face conference with the parents is necessary. During this conference, you can talk to the parents about the issue in a respectful manner. For example, you might share that you are concerned, because some other students have been making fun of the student because of how he smells. Then, you can explain that you would like to work with the parents to come to a solution to the problem. If they explain that they don't shower every day, then do not react with negativity; acknowledge and validate their cultural beliefs. If the parents prefer that you talk to the other students about their culture, then I think that's what you should do. Ultimately, I feel that being open and honest with the parents, and then allowing them to come up with a solution with which everyone is comfortable is key. Certainly, it can be an uncomfortable conversation, but I believe that, if it comes from a place of caring for their child, the parents will respect you and want to help.
Votes: +0 / -0 Vote Up This Solution Is Useful   Vote Down This Solution Is Not Useful  

Comments posted for this solution

Reply Add a Comment
 
     
     
 
Solution 135
Posted June 4, 2015 4:51 pm

Katy Fitzgibbons
Katy Fitzgibbons
Reps: 71
I would hold a private parent-teacher conference with the parents to discuss my concerns before discussing them with the student. I would merely wish to make them aware of the issue as well as the cultural beliefs of mainstream society regarding hygiene. This would allow the parents the opportunity to work with the teacher privately to discuss the matter without involving the student (to avoid embarrassment). While trying to put together this conference, I would maybe want to do some type of research-writing assignment where students research various cultural beliefs regarding aspects of daily life such as hygiene.
Votes: +0 / -0 Vote Up This Solution Is Useful   Vote Down This Solution Is Not Useful  

Comments posted for this solution

Chelsea Abbott
Chelsea Abbott
Reps: 112
I agree that holding a conference with the parents may be the best solution. The parents may explain that it is a culutral situation or that they may not even have running water. After meeting with the parents, I would see if the problem arises again. If so, I would meet with the student in the hallway and offer him advice and give him a small personal hygiene kit. Meeting with the school counselor may also help the student.
  Posted on: October 23, 2015 2:13 pm

Reply Add a Comment
 
     
     
 
Solution 136
Posted June 4, 2015 9:45 pm

emuZuW
emuZuW
Reps: 69
I think that I would write out a thorough letter or email (so that I can choose my words wisely and edit as I see necessary) simply telling the parents what is going on as far as the child being picked on. I'd be careful to assume that the parents are unaware of the American culture with bathing, as this could be offensive too (assuming they are ignorant). However I would primarily focus on the student's well-being and confidence, along with the fact that puberty is nearing for all the students in his grade and new smells are becoming more frequent. I'd then go on to tell a little bit about the normal hygiene routine of most of the children in his class for the parents to consider and learn from IF they actually aren't aware of American hygiene norms I'd mention something like: "most of the students take baths or showers the night before class or the in the morning before, so anything less than this might seem strange to Ian's fellow classmates." This way the parents can take this information and do what they want to with it. I'd follow up as needed if the issues continues, but for now I think it is something to proceed with baby steps.
Votes: +0 / -0 Vote Up This Solution Is Useful   Vote Down This Solution Is Not Useful  

Comments posted for this solution

Reply Add a Comment
 
     
     
 
Solution 137
Posted June 4, 2015 11:25 pm

Meagan Cook
Meagan Cook
Reps: 53
I would start by meeting with the student one on one to see how he feels about the other students. If he realizes that they are making fun of him, then I would further prompt the situation as to why they are doing so to see what his perception is. On that same day, I would have set up a parent, teacher conference to utilize the sandwich method where I would begin with all the great things the student is doing. I would then discuss the conversation him and I had in less detail and then speak with the parents about a plan of action that they would like to see. I would make sure to let them know that this is not to change anything and that nothing is "wrong" with him, but this aspect may want to be altered if the parents choose so to make the student more comfortable in class and in this culture. By no means does this mean that he needs to change who he is or what he stands for though.
Votes: +0 / -0 Vote Up This Solution Is Useful   Vote Down This Solution Is Not Useful  

Comments posted for this solution

Reply Add a Comment
 
     
     
 
Solution 138
Posted June 5, 2015 3:57 am

Brad McMahon
Brad McMahon
Reps: 71
I think it is important to inform the parents about what is going on in school. I think they need to know that their child is having difficulties. They are not required to change their behavior or to force their child to do something that they do not want, in this case, but they should be able to make an informed decision. It may be something as simple as not realizing it is an issue in school. Once they realize it is an issue, the student may change his behavior. I think it is possible to tell the parents about it without making value judgments about their culture.

I also think it is important to express to the students making fun of the student that that behavior will not be tolerated. Certainly the school has a policy about bullying, and these students are probably violating the policy. Regardless of whether the child changes the way he smells, the other children cannot bully him about it. Multicultural education may be helpful in convincing the bullies that this is not anything to be worried about, but at the elementary age, I doubt it. The bullying has to be stopped, however.
Votes: +0 / -0 Vote Up This Solution Is Useful   Vote Down This Solution Is Not Useful  

Comments posted for this solution

Reply Add a Comment
 
     
     
 
Solution 139
Posted June 5, 2015 3:56 pm

yteduM
yteduM
Reps: 77
Say that you have discussed with the class good hygiene, you have had a conference with his parents and he is still coming to school smelly. However, the student wants to do something about his body odor but his parents will not change their cultural ways of not bathing every day. If the student was wanting help on this matter I do not see a problem with handing the student a baby wipe and a stick of deodorant so he can go to the bathroom wipe under his arms and put on deodorant. I would do this in a discrete way so that other kids didn't see what was going on. If his parents found out and had a problem with it I would then address that issue as it arises.
Votes: +0 / -0 Vote Up This Solution Is Useful   Vote Down This Solution Is Not Useful  

Comments posted for this solution

Laura Doolittle
Laura Doolittle
Reps: 109
I like this idea very much. It gives the student a way to feel more comfortable in class and not get picked on by other students. I would just hope the parents would not get offended by the gesture to the student. It is a very sensitive subject but at the same time they also must be respectful to our culture as well.
  Posted on: October 19, 2015 7:33 pm

Reply Add a Comment
 
     
     
 
Solution 140
Posted June 5, 2015 5:24 pm

HyZery
HyZery
Reps: 70
I think this is a very common issue with students whether they have immigrated or if they are from here. I also think that how it is handled might change depending on the age of the student. If the student is very young (4-10), a conference with the parents expressing how wonderful he is first followed by a discussion of some concerns about how he is adjusting and the fact some students are noticing that he smells "different." If the student is older (11-18), a teacher might incorporate a hygiene lesson explaining that bodies go through a lot of changes and that we need to adjust how we take care of ourselves as we get older. Either way, it is a delicate matter and should be approached with sensitivity.
Votes: +0 / -0 Vote Up This Solution Is Useful   Vote Down This Solution Is Not Useful  

Comments posted for this solution

Reply Add a Comment
 
     
     
 
Solution 141
Posted June 5, 2015 5:28 pm

ynyqaz
ynyqaz
Reps: 64
I would start by speaking to my schools counselor. I would see she has ever been in a situation like this and what sort of steps she has taken. I would want to be culturally sensitive but i also want to keep the parents informed of and school issues. A conference may be a good option. I would not ask they the family change their traditions but just make them aware of how others to receiving the difference. Having a student form a different culture would be a great way to learn about that specific culture. Making the other students in the classroom aware of these differences may shed some light on how they wish to treat others.
Votes: +0 / -0 Vote Up This Solution Is Useful   Vote Down This Solution Is Not Useful  

Comments posted for this solution

Reply Add a Comment
 
     
     
 
Solution 142
Posted June 6, 2015 4:49 am

Alyssa Wright
Alyssa Wright
Reps: 69
I think the most appropriate solution to this issue is to teach a mini lesson on hygiene. Then, I think a separate mini lesson should be taught on being tactful and using manners. The students need to realize that is rude to tell someone that they do not look or smell good. Many times when we have similar issues with students making fun of special needs students in our classroom we teach a lesson on differences and in a round about way teach them that everyone is different including the learning styles and speeds.
Votes: +0 / -0 Vote Up This Solution Is Useful   Vote Down This Solution Is Not Useful  

Comments posted for this solution

Reply Add a Comment
 
     
     
 
Solution 143
Posted June 6, 2015 1:32 pm

Farhat Ahmad
Farhat Ahmad
Reps: 68
In my opinion I'm not sure how involved as a teacher I would get in this one other than to intervene when the students are teasing this child and tell them bullying of any kind will not be tolerated. Child who have particular orders is just another day in many of the schools I"ve worked in, granted with some foreign students that smell takes a whole different meaning. I personally would bring things up to the student, maybe discuss with him if he is aware of why he is being teased, and if he wants to do anything personal that would make it stop. I would make sure the kid understands that he isn't doing anything bad, the other kids are the ones who are wrong for teasing him, but to make his life easier perhaps he could try and adhere to American standards of hygiene. Again, the important point here is for this student to understand he isn't doing anything wrong, the other students are for teasing him but perhaps he could make life easier on himself by engaging in X, Y or Z behaviors.
Votes: +0 / -0 Vote Up This Solution Is Useful   Vote Down This Solution Is Not Useful  

Comments posted for this solution

Reply Add a Comment
 
     
     
 
Solution 144
Posted June 6, 2015 7:09 pm

Beth Jackson
Beth Jackson
Reps: 71
I would bring the parents in to discuss the situation with them, prior to discussing it with the student. I would stay very objective and factual during the parent conference. I would discuss that their child is being picked on in the classroom. Since I am not sure if his body odor has any relation to his culture I would approach that very carefully. Perhaps he simply isn't scrubbing in the bath, or needs to start wearing deodorant earlier than the majority of other kids. I would discuss the odor and how it is impacting him in the classroom. If the parents feel comfortable sharing the reasoning with me, I would talk with them about what they could do to help at home. I would ensure the parents understood that I am only looking out for his well-being and am in no way judging him or their parenting techniques.
Votes: +0 / -0 Vote Up This Solution Is Useful   Vote Down This Solution Is Not Useful  

Comments posted for this solution

Reply Add a Comment
 
     
     
 
Solution 145
Posted June 6, 2015 10:48 pm

Misty Coleman
Misty Coleman
Reps: 73
It is great to hear he participates even though he does not speak much English. He's transition into the US must have been very smooth. Where I teach the guidance counselor will talk to students about personal hygiene. Although this is part of his culture, I feel it is something that needs to be brought to his family's attention because he will be made fun of in America. If there is someone in the area from Europe and has made the transition to the hygiene regiments we have here, they could talk to the family about the differences. If not, read up on the culture and make sure you have the background knowledge before discussing this with the child or the parents personally.
Votes: +0 / -0 Vote Up This Solution Is Useful   Vote Down This Solution Is Not Useful  

Comments posted for this solution

Reply Add a Comment
 
     
     
 
Solution 146
Posted June 7, 2015 12:37 am

zyWyma
zyWyma
Reps: 70
I would call the parents in for a conference and explain the situation to them. I would open with how well their son is doing in the class and maybe even show them some of his work. I would talk about how pleased I was with his work and progress in the class, and then explain that I was worried that if something wasn't done, their son may be hurt by his peers teasing them. I would talk to them about how Americans shower more frequently than other countries, and that the other students have started to notice that there son does not bathe as frequently. I would then talk with the parents about how they would like to address the problem.
Votes: +0 / -0 Vote Up This Solution Is Useful   Vote Down This Solution Is Not Useful  

Comments posted for this solution

Reply Add a Comment
 
     
     
 
Solution 147
Posted June 7, 2015 4:05 am

Melissa Aspinwall
Melissa Aspinwall
Reps: 79
I would first research the culture of the student to see if in fact odor is not an issue in that country to make sure I did not offend the student or the parents when I talk with them. If it is a cultural issue I would invite the school nurse to come in and have a lesson on hygiene for all the students. I would also speak to the parents and explain how in our culture body odor is not accepted very well. I find in my classroom that there are usually 2-3 students that have issues with body odor, especially the ones that mature faster, so it would benefit the entire class to hear a lesson. Our nurse is very empathetic and keeps "hygiene goody bags"that she can send home with students once she talks with parents. She makes a touchy subject easier to deal with. I would also invite the school counselor to come in and do a lesson on respect and differences in cultures around the world. I would also suggest the counselor do a little role playing to help the students see how they look and how the one being made fun of feels. I think it would give them a different perspective. Since I have pets in my class, I would use that as a way to talk about what happens when we don't clean the habitat and bathe the animals. We could do a compare and contrast lesson on hygiene of our pets and ourselves. That would be great I think.
Votes: +0 / -0 Vote Up This Solution Is Useful   Vote Down This Solution Is Not Useful  

Comments posted for this solution

Reply Add a Comment
 
     
     
 
Solution 148
Posted June 7, 2015 1:56 pm

RuXuqe
RuXuqe
Reps: 67
It would be best to have the parents come in for a parent-teacher conference with a guidance counselor present. I would be sure to tell the parents all of the great things about the student and would also tell them I called them in because the student is being picked on and why. It can be a delicate situation and there is a real chance of offending the parents, so it should be worded as carefully as possible. It's possible it's not even a body odor problem, but just something being used that smells strangely. I was at a conference once on a college campus and noticed all the students had a strange smell which I thought was body odor. That night I went to shower and noticed that the bathrooms had body soap provided in a dispenser and when I smelled it the soap had the smell of the students. I would also tell he students when they are making fun of him that they are being rude and should not tease any body for any reason.
Votes: +0 / -0 Vote Up This Solution Is Useful   Vote Down This Solution Is Not Useful  

Comments posted for this solution

Reply Add a Comment
 
     
     
 
Solution 149
Posted June 7, 2015 8:13 pm

Syjetu
Syjetu
Reps: 70
This past semester I had a student in my class who you could tell did not take showers everyday; however, I think it was for financial reasons. Students in the class did not want to sit around him and would make snide remarks about him. Therefore, I would take the students making comments about him and hold them after class. I would discuss how it was rude for them to be talking about someone who they know nothing about. I explained how everyone does not live the same and people should not be judged. Talking to the students individually created a wonderful atmosphere in the classroom and I did not hear another peep out of my students. Therefore, I might advise trying that scenario first before sending a letter.
Votes: +0 / -0 Vote Up This Solution Is Useful   Vote Down This Solution Is Not Useful  

Comments posted for this solution

Reply Add a Comment
 
     
     
 
Solution 150
Posted June 8, 2015 12:15 am

Rebecca Ritch
Rebecca Ritch
Reps: 70
I would suggest you setting up a parent conference first, to talk about the matter, and to formulate some possible solutions that would benefit all those involved. It might go over better if you the teacher met with them face to face rather than like you talked about sending a note. If the parents agreed to allow him to put on deodorant before he came to school that would be great. As his teacher I would also suggest to them that even if he doesn't take a shower everyday, to at least try to maybe sponge bathe. I would simply tell the parents, that it is hard enough being "the new kid in class", I don't want him to be embarrassed about the situation, and I don't want the other children to seclude him or treat him poorly because of this.
Votes: +0 / -0 Vote Up This Solution Is Useful   Vote Down This Solution Is Not Useful  

Comments posted for this solution

Reply Add a Comment
 
     
     
 
Solution 151
Posted June 8, 2015 2:02 am

ezyXyh
ezyXyh
Reps: 57
I would let the student go speak with the counselor. This has happened before in my classroom. The student was in 2nd grade and loved going to see the counselor. It worked out well because the counselor did a one-on-one lesson with him. The student went to see the nurse for some hygiene products and it went over well with the child. I believe if you handle this matter discreetly, it will go over well.
Votes: +0 / -0 Vote Up This Solution Is Useful   Vote Down This Solution Is Not Useful  

Comments posted for this solution

Reply Add a Comment
 
     
     
 
Solution 152
Posted June 8, 2015 3:50 am

yBySuL
yBySuL
Reps: 70
Talk with the counselor to see what he/she suggest. I believe at this point he would be willing to understand the difference between cultures and try explaining it to him out of the presence of the children. He is aware that the children are teasing him and assure him you want to help and see if he welcomes your advice. I would try doing some research or ask other teachers if they have had a situation like this and what their advice would be.
Votes: +0 / -0 Vote Up This Solution Is Useful   Vote Down This Solution Is Not Useful  

Comments posted for this solution

Reply Add a Comment
 
     
     
 
Solution 153
Posted June 8, 2015 6:13 am

zyzaSy
zyzaSy
Reps: 68
This certainly is a touchy topic. First and foremost I would address the issue of teasing. You are the adult in charge of this group of students and it is your responsibility to ensure the safety of every child. Teasing shouldn't be allowed or tolerated under any circumstances. I wouldn't, however, address the teasing by naming names as this would only embarrass the new student further. With this immediate step taken, I would then suggest calling the new student's parents to set up a face to face conference. In the conference I would use the book ends method to broach the subject: positive, tough topic, positive. After this, a mini-lesson about personal hygiene, perhaps even incorporating a hygiene journal that involves the parents of each student, would be my next step.
Votes: +0 / -0 Vote Up This Solution Is Useful   Vote Down This Solution Is Not Useful  

Comments posted for this solution

Reply Add a Comment
 
     
     
 
Solution 154
Posted October 18, 2015 11:54 pm

qasytu
qasytu
Reps: 107
I teach 9th graders and believe you me, I have seen, and smelled my share of the "smelly kids". I call them out in the hall, outside of class and present them with a personal hygiene kit. This would be a bag with soap, shampoo, deodorant, gum, toothbrush, toothpaste, etc. I explain to them that it is a very difficult conversation to have, but I would rather them hear it from someone that loves them (me) then to hear it from someone that is out to hurt them. I would also explain that this is in no way meant to abuse the beliefs or traditions of their culture. I simply want them to fit in as much as possible and I fear that everyone would be talking about them behind their back and it would be so much better if he and I talked face to face.
Votes: +0 / -0 Vote Up This Solution Is Useful   Vote Down This Solution Is Not Useful  

Comments posted for this solution

Reply Add a Comment
 
     
     
 
Solution 155
Posted October 19, 2015 12:10 am

eJeSaX
eJeSaX
Reps: 75
I think a respectful letter home or conference would be the best idea. If sending the letter, get a coworker to proofread and make sure it reads the way you intend. The conference may be the best solution because the parents can see your body language and demeanor.
Votes: +0 / -0 Vote Up This Solution Is Useful   Vote Down This Solution Is Not Useful  

Comments posted for this solution

Reply Add a Comment
 
     
     
 
Solution 156
Posted October 19, 2015 12:49 am

yDaNyn
yDaNyn
Reps: 75
Also, if you are ensure in how to handle the problem, couldn't your school counselor be of assistance as well?
Votes: +0 / -0 Vote Up This Solution Is Useful   Vote Down This Solution Is Not Useful  

Comments posted for this solution

Reply Add a Comment
 
     
     
 
Solution 157
Posted October 19, 2015 4:11 pm

Japuje
Japuje
Reps: 107
I've taught several students over the past few years that have had a similar problem. They were considered the smelly kids in class and were sometimes singled out as such by other students. This is going to be an awkward, uncomfortable situation no matter how you decide to tackle it. The best way to address it would be to have a meeting with the parents and explain to them that other students are beginning to pick on their child due to his body odor and you are worried this may cause him to feel singled out and, in turn, affecting his performance in school.
Votes: +0 / -0 Vote Up This Solution Is Useful   Vote Down This Solution Is Not Useful  

Comments posted for this solution

Reply Add a Comment
 
     
     
 
Solution 158
Posted October 19, 2015 7:28 pm

Laura Doolittle
Laura Doolittle
Reps: 109
I feel like this subject is very sensitive. I would first go over a lesson about personal hygiene. The lesson could talk about ways to stay clean and normal routines that student should follow daily. If the lesson does not work and the problem continues, I would talk to the students parents and explain the situation in a delicate way to them. I feel like as long as you are showing concern about the problem that it would not disrespect their culture.
Votes: +0 / -0 Vote Up This Solution Is Useful   Vote Down This Solution Is Not Useful  

Comments posted for this solution

Reply Add a Comment
 
     
     
 
Solution 159
Posted October 20, 2015 11:33 pm

ehyNyn
ehyNyn
Reps: 109
Students within any classroom have the right to be comfortable and welcomed. This being said, the student is in danger of being put in a situation in which he is not comfortable because the other students around begin to pick on him. While taking showers and baths may not be promoted in his culture, it is important that he understands that, in the United States, showers and baths are promoted. Now, I do not advocate embarrassing the student in any way, but I would at least have your counselor have a conversation with the student about this. While it may embarrass him for a short time to have this discussion, I feel that it will be less embarrassing than getting harassed by other students because they do not understand.
Votes: +0 / -0 Vote Up This Solution Is Useful   Vote Down This Solution Is Not Useful  

Comments posted for this solution

Reply Add a Comment
 
     
     
 
Solution 160
Posted October 22, 2015 12:39 pm

Kristen Bagwell
Kristen Bagwell
Reps: 107
I've been in this same situation (but in a high school setting), and it's difficult. To begin with, I would remind the whole class (maybe at the end of the day, after being outside for recess, or after PE) that their bodies are developing and changing and that everyone needs to remember to shower daily and wear deodorant; by reminding all students, you aren't only talking to your new student, and let's be honest, all students could use a reminder every now and then. If this doesn't work, I would involve the counselor. Maybe he/she has a better understanding of the child's culture and has a way to inform the family that would not be offensive. If the you and the counselor meet with the parents, I would focus on the fact that the child is getting picked on, which is detrimental to his learning. I would address the other students in the classroom by telling them that any form of bullying will not be tolerated.
Votes: +0 / -0 Vote Up This Solution Is Useful   Vote Down This Solution Is Not Useful  

Comments posted for this solution

Reply Add a Comment
 
     
     
 
Solution 161
Posted October 23, 2015 2:11 pm

Chelsea Abbott
Chelsea Abbott
Reps: 112
I would recommend that you send a note home asking the parents to meet for a conference. When you meet with the parents start off that the child is doing a great job participating and is trying to be friendly with other classmates. After the positives, I would state that other children have been making fun of him due to a "smell" that has been in the classroom. If the parents know that their child is being made fun of they will want to do whatever they can do to help him. I would state that it could possibly be his clothes or something that he brings with him to school. I would finish the conversation with more positives, such as, he is a wonderful child and that I would like to make sure he is having the best time in my classroom!
Votes: +0 / -0 Vote Up This Solution Is Useful   Vote Down This Solution Is Not Useful  

Comments posted for this solution

Reply Add a Comment
 
     
     
 
Solution 162
Posted October 23, 2015 7:39 pm

Edward Kim
Edward Kim
Reps: 106
I believe that you cannot look at it as being disrespectful to a certain culture. You as a teacher's first responsibility is towards the student and their education. The simple fact is that the child is being made fun of because of the way he smells. I am sure that he does not enjoy being made fun of and I am sure that the teasing is most likely affecting his ability and desire to learn. He may not feel safe or comfortable in the classroom with his classmates. When speaking with the parents you must approach it from that point of view. You must explain that you are not trying to offend them but simply looking out for their child's well being and education. I am not sure how a parent could get mad at that approach but if they do get mad just know that you did the right thing. That you wanted to help that child succeed. You cannot control how others react.
Votes: +0 / -0 Vote Up This Solution Is Useful   Vote Down This Solution Is Not Useful  

Comments posted for this solution

Reply Add a Comment
 
     
     
 
Solution 163
Posted October 25, 2015 2:37 am

PysaHe
PysaHe
Reps: 101
Any time that a student is at risk for having social problems in the classroom, I would contact the parents. One specification I would make, is to be sure that you are not placing your opinions in the conference. Be sure that you're just stating the facts that the student is getting unwanted attention and the cause of it. You should not suggest any changes in their family routines. I would also give your students some information and teachings about the culture of the new student.
Votes: +0 / -0 Vote Up This Solution Is Useful   Vote Down This Solution Is Not Useful  

Comments posted for this solution

Reply Add a Comment
 
     
     
 
Solution 164
Posted October 25, 2015 2:55 am

Jill Elton
Jill Elton
Reps: 108
I believe it would be best to ask the parents to come in for a conference. Because we are not told the age of the child, this would be a good time to tell the parents what you are experiencing and you could recommend that they go see a doctor as body odor could be a sign of something else going on within the child's body. Too, the parents may not know what to expect of children at this age in this country. I believe the parents would be appreciative of this information and happy to know that the teacher has the best interest of their child at heart.
Votes: +0 / -0 Vote Up This Solution Is Useful   Vote Down This Solution Is Not Useful  

Comments posted for this solution

Reply Add a Comment
 
     
     
 
Solution 165
Posted October 25, 2015 4:57 pm

yWasyD
yWasyD
Reps: 107
You have to read about his culture before concluding whether his body odor or his not showering daily has anything to do with his culture because it might not be. Nobody from any culture would like to hang around a smelly person but reactions are just different based on the fact that more matured people might be able to hold their opinions back so that the person involved does not feel embarrassed. This is not the case as it involves children who are not sensitive to other children so the best thing is to have a meeting with the parents and try and know what is going on. It might be that he is not being properly supervised and need more supervision with his hygiene.
Votes: +0 / -0 Vote Up This Solution Is Useful   Vote Down This Solution Is Not Useful  

Comments posted for this solution

Reply Add a Comment
 
     
     
 
Solution 166
Posted October 25, 2015 7:38 pm

uPaSeW
uPaSeW
Reps: 209
I would tell the parents of the issues that the student is facing in the classroom. I am sure that once they realize what is happening in the classroom, they will do what they need to do to help their student. No parent wants their child to be teased at school. I think that once they realize how he is being treated they will take it upon themselves to fix the problem.
Votes: +0 / -0 Vote Up This Solution Is Useful   Vote Down This Solution Is Not Useful  

Comments posted for this solution

Reply Add a Comment
 
     
     
 
Solution 167
Posted October 25, 2015 11:39 pm

Jasmine Bringuel
Jasmine Bringuel
Reps: 102
A possible solution to your problem would be to contact the counselor or psychologist to discuss the problem. Together you can find a way to teach the different aspects of other cultures, but this could back fire on the student, so another possibility would be to have a meeting with the parents. First talk with administration about the problem and how to help with setting up a meeting with the parents. The meeting needs to be done in a delicate manner to not offend the parents. You can discuss the problem that has arise in the class and what you want to do with a lesson on different cultures, but also make sure to tell the parents that this may cause more problems. Ask the parents what they think would be a good solution, so that they are involved. This may not be a good solution, but this is a hard case to help with.
Votes: +0 / -0 Vote Up This Solution Is Useful   Vote Down This Solution Is Not Useful  

Comments posted for this solution

Reply Add a Comment
 
     
     
 
Solution 168
Posted October 26, 2015 11:58 am

ezajaV
ezajaV
Reps: 102
I would start by first, sending home a respectful letter to his parents requesting a parent-teacher conference. When the parents come in you can learn the history of his culture and go from there. You can have a lesson on personal hygiene. You can have the students write down in a journal how they take care of themselves. You can then read that students journal. By reading it, you will have a general idea of what he believes in and what he came from.
Votes: +0 / -0 Vote Up This Solution Is Useful   Vote Down This Solution Is Not Useful  

Comments posted for this solution

ezajaV
ezajaV
Reps: 102
I also agree that you could send home a letter to the parents requesting a conference. This will give you a good idea of where the student came from.
  Posted on: October 26, 2015 11:59 am

Reply Add a Comment
 
     
     
 
Solution 169
Posted October 26, 2015 11:18 pm

Kateline Vaughn
Kateline Vaughn
Reps: 106
If possible, it would be nice to approach this issue in a whole group. This way all students are informed of what good hygiene looks like without having to mention a specific child. I don't think there is a such thing as "too good hygiene" so it can be beneficial for all students. If the lesson does not affect the child, then I would suggest contacting his parents in a respectful manner that shows you are concerned for their son's well-being.
Votes: +0 / -0 Vote Up This Solution Is Useful   Vote Down This Solution Is Not Useful  

Comments posted for this solution

Reply Add a Comment
 
     
     
 
Solution 170
Posted October 27, 2015 3:39 pm

Amanda Whittaker
Amanda Whittaker
Reps: 114
If you aren't sure how to approach the parents, then I would speak with the counselor in your building. They are trained in how to deal with these types of situations and may be able to offer some assistance that you don't know about. If that doesn't work then call the parents and either let them know about what is going on or ask them to come in so you can speak to them face to face. It may not be apart of their culture and you wouldn't want to offend them saying it was. Once you talk to the parents I'm sure they will fix the problem because I'm sure they don't want their child made fun.
Votes: +0 / -0 Vote Up This Solution Is Useful   Vote Down This Solution Is Not Useful  

Comments posted for this solution

Reply Add a Comment
 
     
     
 
Solution 171
Posted October 28, 2015 8:02 pm

Tetygy
Tetygy
Reps: 90
This can be a touchy situation. I think asking the parents for a conference would be best and respectfully explaining the situation to them. Explain that you are not trying to disrespect their culture is important. Most parents would want to do something to avoid their child being teased. Also, the children need to be addressed. Teasing and bullying is not allowed.
Votes: +0 / -0 Vote Up This Solution Is Useful   Vote Down This Solution Is Not Useful  

Comments posted for this solution

Reply Add a Comment
 
     
     
 
Solution 172
Posted October 31, 2015 8:36 pm

Daisy Dumler
Daisy Dumler
Reps: 106
I would try and get in touch with the parents and have a face to face conversation about the issue. I would explain to them that other kids are picking on their child because he smells a little different. I would try and suggest that he possibly wear some deodorant or cologne because I don't want his feelings to get hurt. It's a very awkward conversation to have but for the well being of the child its necessary.
Votes: +0 / -0 Vote Up This Solution Is Useful   Vote Down This Solution Is Not Useful  

Comments posted for this solution

Reply Add a Comment
 
     
     
 
Solution 173
Posted November 2, 2015 1:41 am

Qybuse
Qybuse
Reps: 118
I think the biggest issue here is the fact that students in this elementary classroom are picking on and making fun of another student. To me, this would be the biggest red flag. I think the teacher should address the students who are picking on the student immediately in a small group setting. It is crucial that they are reminded about how to appropriately interact and communicate with their peers, and if changes are not noticed immediately disciplinary action should be taken. It is never okay for students to pick on another student. I think it would also be wise for the teacher to engage her whole class in activities that promote social and cultural acceptance.
Votes: +0 / -0 Vote Up This Solution Is Useful   Vote Down This Solution Is Not Useful  

Comments posted for this solution

Reply Add a Comment
 
     
     
 
Solution 174
Posted November 2, 2015 1:42 am