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Posted on October 18, 2014 2:58 am
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Heather Long
Heather Long
Reps: 103
Difficult IEP Meetings
A teacher has difficulty with her EBD student. He does not work independently. He has difficulty with grade level work and he does not complete homework, nor does his mother work with him to get it done. His IEP meeting is approaching. How does this teacher confront this parent about these issues. I always pull the positive out. He is a friendly student who enjoys helping his teacher, etc. but the facts are that this child has difficulty with above stated issues. The teacher does not feel beating around the bushes about these issues will benefit this family at all.
 
     
     
 
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Solution 1
Posted October 18, 2014 6:53 pm

aWeRun
aWeRun
Reps: 104
I completely understand the difficulty of presenting a parent with information they may feel is negative. Definitely present positive info first as you stated. Also, ask the parent if they have any concerns before you start. That let's them feel that you are interested in their view point as well. Usually if a parent is able to talk to you and get their feelings out, it will calm their nerves. Throughout the year, call them just to say something positive and brag. Then, when you have to present the negative, they will be more open to hearing it. I hope this helps!
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Brianne Blowers
Brianne Blowers
Reps: 102
I think starting off with a positive and asking the parents about their concerns is a great way to start the meeting.
  Posted on: October 19, 2014 9:37 pm

Danielle Brock
Danielle Brock
Reps: 100
I will use this in the future for sure!
  Posted on: March 1, 2015 10:38 pm

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Solution 2
Posted October 19, 2014 2:59 pm

anuLyH
anuLyH
Reps: 175
I would definitely start off with the good reports because what parent wants negative reports all the time. Then I would let the parent know what is occurring with this student and I would suggest possible solutions to help. I think suggesting solutions would give the parent a sense of relief that it is not the end and that their child could get help.
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Solution 3
Posted February 21, 2015 8:42 pm

yjugeM
yjugeM
Reps: 90
Starting and ending on a positive note is a good idea. I would still keep it direct. Beating around the bush won't solve anything.
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Solution 4
Posted February 19, 2015 3:43 pm

SeguHu
SeguHu
Reps: 96
One option is to discuss the issues with an administrator, previous teacher, or staffing specialist. They usually have a lot of experience in dealing with issues just like that. A previous teacher will have experience with the parents and advice regarding how they react.
As far as doing homework, I would use some time during the school day to complete it. I might have them stay during lunch to work one on one or take some activity time during the day.
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Solution 5
Posted March 16, 2015 2:30 am

equLyV
equLyV
Reps: 104
Documentation is key in this situation. You don't have to approach the parents or child in a punitive manner as this child is EBD and negativity may trigger unwanted behavior. Just show the parents that their child is very well behaved and is helpful with the teacher, but his school work is suffering and here is the documentation to show. People can't deny data and facts, so any test scores and work samples should inform the child, their parents, and the special education departments that IEP amendments may need to be made because the current modifications are not working and this student isn't progressing.
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