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Posted on November 25, 2012 4:06 am
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Yasar Bodur
Yasar Bodur
Reps: 614
Student Won’t Stop Crying
This is the first time I am teaching 2nd grade. I have taught 4th and 5th grades for the last 20 years. I have had to go through an adaptation process, but everything is working okay now. Students and I have learned to work with each other very well. Three weeks ago a new student joined my classroom. He and his family moved to the US from Japan. Since he arrived, he has been crying. He does not speak any English, and there is no one at my school who speaks Japanese. Both of his parents have full time jobs, so they cannot come to school every time I call them. What I found out from the parents is that he cries because he misses his friends in Japan. I think the issue is bigger than that. I have not found a way to help him yet. Why do you think he cries every day? What can I do to stop the crying because the other students in my class get distracted when starts crying?
 
     
     
 
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Solution 1
Posted November 29, 2012 5:58 pm

Meredith Hein
Meredith Hein
Reps: 139
I think that must be difficult for a child to move to a completely new country with a different language in the second grade. I think an important thing to start of with would be to ask the parents to let the child bring some things from home that make him feel comforted or as if he's back in Japan (ex. stuffed animal, pictures of friends/family members, etc.) It is also important for you as the teacher to try to learn some of his language. It might be fun if one day you take time to go over with the entire class words in Japanese that may be useful for everyone to know. You can also correlate those Japanese words with the English equivalent, so not only are the other students learning but your new student as well. In order to put the new student at ease, you can create signs in your classroom with both Japanese and English writing to help him familiarize him with everyday things. Another important step in helping him stop crying would be to assign a few students to befriend him and make him feel comforted so he has someone just there for him, since you as a teacher can't only cater to him.
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Comments posted for this solution

Monique Cook
Monique Cook
Reps: 70
I think giving the entire class a Japanese lesson would be a great idea! he could get involved here and feel appreciated and welcomed.
  Posted on: June 5, 2013 1:57 pm

PyruNe
PyruNe
Reps: 47
It might be helpful to make sharing a new Japanese word each day part of daily calendar activities. Keeping a record of these words would serve as an anchor chart for students and help them be able to communicate with the new student. It might also help him feel that the teacher and other students are interested in helping become acclimated to his new environment. Additionally, because he is the expert in this situation, it will help build his self-esteem. As the number of words on the chart grows, the other students will be better able to communicate with the new student.
  Posted on: June 28, 2013 8:42 pm

NyVyTy
NyVyTy
Reps: 90
I also agree that giving the class a Japanese lesson would make the student more comfortable. I also believe that if he could be paired with others to help him use the internet to translate those words into English, he would build friendships and gain confidence within himself to master the Standard American Language.
  Posted on: October 3, 2014 6:12 pm

BazaNu
BazaNu
Reps: 89
I love the idea of teaching the other children a Japanese "word of the day"! Not only could it help this student feel more welcomed, it will expose the students to another language. I know the schools near me don't offer language classes until at least the middle grades, but being multi-lingual is a valuable trait.
  Posted on: October 7, 2014 7:41 pm

SaSyXu
SaSyXu
Reps: 105
I like the idea of having the student teach the class some things about the Japanese culture. He could even spend some time teaching them some of the Japanese language. The other students, in turn, could teach him some of those words in English so that his English can improve as well.
  Posted on: October 7, 2014 8:33 pm

PyveDu
PyveDu
Reps: 101
I like the idea of sharing his culture with the rest of the class. Esp in second grade these students are learning to write letters and communicate effectively. They should engage in writing letters to his old school in Japan. This child could also teach others the words and how to write them in his language. :)
  Posted on: October 9, 2014 8:36 pm

HyraLe
HyraLe
Reps: 73
This is a great idea to go over some Japanese words and phrases with the class. This will benefit the new student and also be fun for the class.
  Posted on: October 27, 2014 6:55 am

uJabaz
uJabaz
Reps: 100
I agree that giving the class a word of the day would make the Japanese student feel more welcomed and he may even get excited that his peers want to learn more about his language. It may be a double whammy, keeping the student from crying and giving the class a language/history lesson.
  Posted on: February 26, 2015 12:55 am

Ashley Noe
Ashley Noe
Reps: 99
I agree with your ideas. Somehow incorporating Japanese words into the day might be fun!
  Posted on: March 1, 2015 3:16 am

jamasy
jamasy
Reps: 67
Teaching a lesson about Japanese culture would be helpful in aiding the student in the task of making new friends. The teacher stated that he believes the crying is a result of something deeper. I think it could be the result of a fear of his academic standing dropping. The only thing that could help in this situation is an understanding with the parents.
  Posted on: June 1, 2015 8:15 pm

vabehe
vabehe
Reps: 69
I also like the idea of incorporating Japanese words and cultural practices into a class time. You could, around Christmas time, do a Christmas around the world and use the days to incorporate holiday traditions of various countries and cultures. I would do Japan one of those days and allow children to make comparisons and congrats to their culture. It would be neat to note the similarities in the two.
  Posted on: June 2, 2015 12:15 am

Monica Rainwater
Monica Rainwater
Reps: 71
Many of the ideas that you shared are wonderful, but I wonder if some of them may be too abrupt to use immediately. I do love the idea about doing a study on Japan with the whole class, but I thin it may need to be approached in a little different manner. If a lot of attention is brought to him and his culture, it could make him become even more introverted than he already is. Maybe instead of just studying the Japanese culture, it would be a good idea to break the class into smaller groups, and have a few different cultures being studied and projects shared. This could also be a neat way for many different students to notice that there are actually some similarities among differing cultures that they were never aware of before.
  Posted on: June 2, 2015 3:07 pm

yzaSeR
yzaSeR
Reps: 68
Incorporating Japanese into lessons would not only benefit him but also the other students in your class. That's a really great idea.
  Posted on: June 3, 2015 1:11 pm

Chris Clark
Chris Clark
Reps: 70
I really like your idea of choosing a few friends to befriend him. Some people might find this to be impossible, but I am always amazed at the relationships my children can build across barriers. Last year, I taught a student who spoke no English. In a week, he had several friends, all of whom had created their own ways of communicating with him. It was as if they were just naturally attuned to him. They would use hand gestures and pointing to teach him rules to games, etc. And he picked up things so quickly!
  Posted on: June 4, 2015 3:45 am

Sarah Davis
Sarah Davis
Reps: 69
Each of the ideas you presented in the solution are excellent. I believe that each of would help the student adapt to the classroom and decrease his crying. I particularly like your solution of providing Japanese symbols throughout the classroom and teaching a mini Japanese language lesson. Excellent solution.
  Posted on: June 4, 2015 6:43 pm

yteduM
yteduM
Reps: 77
Excellent solution. I like the idea of bringing something from home. My twin girls are in the second grade and they both have a silk blanket that they like to hold when they are stressed, sleepy, or don't feel good. I also think that its smart to translate English words into Japanese so you as a teacher will have a few words that you can memorize do make communication easier. Having at least 2 other students to be nice to him and try to comfort him will also help ease his stress of being away from his friends.
  Posted on: June 5, 2015 4:04 pm

HyZery
HyZery
Reps: 70
That is beautiful! I too suggested that the teacher learn some phrases and then teach some to the students. I really think this would create a welcoming environment to make the student feel more at ease. Thank you for your post!
  Posted on: June 5, 2015 5:44 pm

Beth Jackson
Beth Jackson
Reps: 71
I think it would be a great idea to start incorporating his language into the classroom. This is a great way to make him feel comfortable and respected in the classroom. Perhaps once he realizes he doesn't have to let go of his home and cultural beliefs, he will be more willing to interact with the other students and become an involved student in the classroom.
  Posted on: June 6, 2015 6:50 pm

Melissa Aspinwall
Melissa Aspinwall
Reps: 79
I agree that labeling objects in the class and around the school in English and Japanese would not only help the 2nd grade immigrant but also help the other students be able to learn words to start communicating in Japanese. The "word of the day" is an excellent idea. I think your ideas fall into the CAP system that Igoa spoke of in her book "The Inner World of the Immigrant Child". I like the idea of using drawings to help communicate. I think by incorporating languages of immigrant children and allowing them to continue using it while they learn English. This student reminds me of the student, Nicolai, in Igoa's classroom. The difference being he was missing his grandmother and her warmth. Like Igoa mentioned, her students mention that the teacher is their closest friend at first when they enter a new country and school.
  Posted on: June 7, 2015 2:36 am

Katy Fitzgibbons
Katy Fitzgibbons
Reps: 71
I love your ideas. I think that setting aside class time for the student to teach the rest of the class pieces of his or her primary language would be very eye-opening for the students. Moreover, connecting these words to the English cognates would help both the new student as well as his or her classmates communicate. Bringing artifacts from home would help the student feel more comfortable. I think it could also facilitate discussions regarding the two cultures similarities and differences.
  Posted on: June 8, 2015 1:32 am

Brad McMahon
Brad McMahon
Reps: 71
I like the idea about allowing the child to bring some personal items to class. I think this could help the student and may be necessary for other students as well. I would be cautious that this could make some other students jealous that this student is allowed to have "toys" in class and could be disruptive in that manner, however.
  Posted on: June 8, 2015 4:35 am

Syjetu
Syjetu
Reps: 70
I really enjoyed your post. I love the idea of creating signs or motions that would be in both English and Japanese. The teacher could also pull the student aside and make individual "key signs" that could make the student feel special and important in the classroom.
  Posted on: June 10, 2015 3:08 am

deTusa
deTusa
Reps: 74
I think it would be a great idea to teach some of the students words in Japanese and to also help the student with the words in English. This would be fun for all of the students and would begin making a connection between them. Maybe the students would begin to understand how hard it is for them to say Japanese words and would know that he is having a hard time learning English as well.
  Posted on: June 12, 2015 1:26 pm

Puzesu
Puzesu
Reps: 21
I love these suggestions. You should try to make him feel as at home as possible. Maybe have his family come in one day if they could and have them educate the class on the Japanese culture. Have the class do research projects on the Japanese and incorporate it as much as possible into your classroom. Make it an embracing of another culture not a roadblock. Most of these students may never have the exposure to another culture like this. And it would make your Japanese student feel more at home and that people don't completely misunderstand him.
  Posted on: June 13, 2015 6:47 pm

Japuje
Japuje
Reps: 107
I like the idea of having dependable students focus on making him feel comfortable. Sometimes the teacher can't do this alone and it can be more helpful to allow the students to help because some of them may have gone through a similar situation.
  Posted on: October 5, 2015 2:47 pm

ezajaV
ezajaV
Reps: 102
I love the idea of having a "Japanese word of the day." I think that would be a great idea. By having the word of the day, it will make the student feel like he is at home.
  Posted on: October 12, 2015 11:51 am

Kateline Vaughn
Kateline Vaughn
Reps: 106
These are all excellent ideas. Allowing the student to bring something to school that reminds him of Japan or his friends in Japan might help comfort him. I also like the idea of studying Japanese words in class. This shows the student that the teacher and other students are willing to come to him, instead of him being the only person learning a new language. This can also give him something in common with the other kids. I also think it's a good idea to assign him a "buddy" to show him how to do things at school. Even though they might not speak the same language, body language and gestures are powerful.
  Posted on: October 13, 2015 4:18 pm

nydyra
nydyra
Reps: 202
Decorating the classroom with culture is a wonderful idea. I wouldn't stop at just the one culture though, as to not make it seem too obvious. Also, letting the student bring something of comfort from home is a very nurturing way to help him. He needs the support from as many people as possible, but I'm certain he doesn't want to be overwhelmed.
  Posted on: October 17, 2015 7:16 am

Amanda Whittaker
Amanda Whittaker
Reps: 114
I think that giving the entire class a Japanese lesson is a great idea. All students should see how other cultures differ from ours and it would help them better understand the student.
  Posted on: October 18, 2015 7:53 pm

uPaSeW
uPaSeW
Reps: 209
I really like the idea of starting a Japanese and English word wall. I think this will allow the student to see himself in the classroom as well and maybe it won't feel like such a foreign place. I also like the idea of having the student bring something from home such as a teddy bear to keep with him in class. This may give the student some sense of security while he is in the classroom setting.
  Posted on: October 19, 2015 2:39 am

Kady Schlemmer
Kady Schlemmer
Reps: 101
I like the idea of putting posters up with bo English and Japanese words on them to relate simple every day items. This will be a great way for all of the students to learn a new language! I also agree that having a Japanese culture day would be a great show to the student that you are trying to be supportive of him and make him feel comfortable and wanted in the class.
  Posted on: July 9, 2016 3:57 pm

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Solution 2
Posted December 4, 2012 2:48 pm

Sha'keela McClendon
Sha'keela McClendon
Reps: 141
This is a very sensitive situation but put yourself in that students shoes. He's not comfortable with this new surroundings. In my education classes, we always talk about ways to make the classroom seem like a home. Have the student bring in his favorite things like a stuffed animal, a poster or anything that reminds him of home and have it there for him in the classroom. Research about the Japanese culture. Where there are signs in English put them in Japanese. Take the time to sit and try to talk with him, even if you have to play picture-nary with him.
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Comments posted for this solution

Emilee Roberts
Emilee Roberts
Reps: 69
I liked the idea of bringing a safe item to school. I think that this would help create a more comforting environment for him and I would hope that it would help reduce the crying.
  Posted on: June 5, 2013 9:55 am

Colleen Keller
Colleen Keller
Reps: 92
This is a very sensitive issue, but I do agree that you should put yourself in his shoes to try and understand how he feels. I like that you said to try and find ways to make the classroom more like his in Japan, and to research different things about Japan to try and help make him feel comfortable in his new school.
  Posted on: June 6, 2013 8:05 pm

Megan Teague
Megan Teague
Reps: 55
Safe items are always a plus in the classroom. I would also allow him to bring in items to show his friends. Maybe use the translation website while he is presenting. Let him get involved in the teaching process if willing. I would not push to hard though. He is already sensitive and having him the focus might not be a comfort to him.
  Posted on: June 6, 2014 7:51 pm

jamasy
jamasy
Reps: 67
Find a good trustworthy student in the class who will take up time with the student. Bringing things to remind the student of home is a great idea but he needs to make new friends here. The language barrier might make things harder for a while but someone taking up time with the student will make a huge difference.
  Posted on: June 1, 2015 8:19 pm

Kaitlin Stringer
Kaitlin Stringer
Reps: 116
I like the idea of making the classroom seem more inviting by adding some Japanese words and signs to the classroom. From what I have seen, when a new student arrives there are usually a few students who attempt to make them feel comfortable right away. Seeing as how this student does not speak English though, the students might be a little more reluctant to approach him. If this was the case, I would as a responsible student to become his buddy and look out for him as he gets acclimated to the classroom.
  Posted on: June 2, 2015 3:11 pm

TyhyMa
TyhyMa
Reps: 84
I have seen this technique in a lot of post and I think it is a very great way to get the student to open up and learn a little better.
  Posted on: June 3, 2015 6:30 pm

Chris Clark
Chris Clark
Reps: 70
I really think it is so important, as you said, to put yourself in the student's shoes. I felt for him so strongly just reading the scenario. I cannot imagine being in second grade and moved to a strange new school in a new country where no talked like me. Plus, the trauma of leaving behind friends and family! It would be a lot to ask even a well-adjusted, capable adult to deal with, much less a young boy. Your suggestion of using Japanese signage, I think, is a small but important strategy. It is a small token of respect and inclusion that could make a world of difference for this young boy. Plus, it would be a great learning tool for the other students.
  Posted on: June 4, 2015 3:56 am

Nicole Turner
Nicole Turner
Reps: 70
I really like the idea of making the classroom feel like home. I couldn't imagine being that far away from home without knowing much of the language or having any friends. Bringing in items that remind him of home would make the student much more comfortable with his surroundings and able him to open up more as well.
  Posted on: June 4, 2015 8:43 pm

HyZery
HyZery
Reps: 70
You make a wonderful suggestion about making the environment more like home. The idea of bringing in familiar items to decorate the classroom or make him feel comfortable is a very sensitive way to bond with a student. Thank you for your post!
  Posted on: June 5, 2015 5:47 pm

Katy Fitzgibbons
Katy Fitzgibbons
Reps: 71
Pictionary would be a great game to use as an ice breaker activity for this new student. Having all of the students bring in artifacts that exemplify them and that they find meaningful could also help develop each student's intra- and interpersonal skills.
  Posted on: June 8, 2015 1:33 am

yBySuL
yBySuL
Reps: 70
I know time in limited with a full class of students but maybe taking some time by asking for assistance with the class for a few days could lead to some type of communication between teacher and student. This is a sensitive situation no doubt. I believe seeking help from other teachers or colleagues would be beneficial.
  Posted on: June 8, 2015 3:45 am

deTusa
deTusa
Reps: 74
It would be nice for him to get to bring some things from home into the classroom. Maybe this would make him feel more comfortable. That is a big step when it comes to helping a student open up.
  Posted on: June 12, 2015 1:28 pm

Laura Doolittle
Laura Doolittle
Reps: 109


I like the idea of bringing items from home to make him feel better about his new classroom. I also think putting up Japanese signs would really help him feel more at home. I cant imagine being in a place where I had no idea what people were saying around me!
  Posted on: October 4, 2015 8:24 pm

Japuje
Japuje
Reps: 107
I agree that it could be beneficial to allow the student to bring something from home to make him feel more at ease with his new surroundings. Researching Japanese culture would also show the student that his new teachers and classmates are willing to learn about his home to make him feel more comfortable and accepted.
  Posted on: October 5, 2015 2:46 pm

Amanda Whittaker
Amanda Whittaker
Reps: 114
I think these are great suggestions to help the little boy out. Signs in both languages will not only help the student, but will also teach the rest of the class about a new culture. Also, kids at this age can usually be very nice and will help others that are different from them.
  Posted on: October 16, 2015 2:12 am

Jasmine Bringuel
Jasmine Bringuel
Reps: 102
I like the idea of having the child bring something from home that will help him transition into the classroom as well as having signs in Japanese and talking with the student using Pictionary. The bringing something from home to school to me seems like that would be more for elementary children then middle and high school, but the Pictionary game could be for all age groups.
  Posted on: October 18, 2015 8:57 pm

uPaSeW
uPaSeW
Reps: 209
I like the pic-tionary idea. Because the student does not speak English, pic-tionary is a great way for you and the student to communicate with each other. It is also a good way to make the student feel more comfortable around you.
  Posted on: October 19, 2015 2:42 am

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Solution 3
Posted June 4, 2013 4:10 pm

Stephanie Harmon
Stephanie Harmon
Reps: 84
I feel that the best person to speak to in this situation is the school counselor. He/She will understand that best steps to take to help your students and determine the root of his crying. He might need to spend time with the counselor until he adjusts to the changes. Moving from school to school is difficult enough for a young child so I can only imagine the emotional turmoil the student is in moving to an entirely new country as well. There are also many school systems that will work to find someone who can come in as a translator to help you and the counselor communicate with the student more effectively.
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Comments posted for this solution

qyzeha
qyzeha
Reps: 105
I agree that working with the counselor is a great idea! The counselor would be the most helpful person in helping the teacher find the resources he/she needs to learn to communicate with the child. If the child spent time with the counselor if may help him feel that he has a person at the school he can trust, which will hopefully help him feel safe and not feel the urge to cry so often.
  Posted on: June 5, 2013 6:18 pm

CI-GSU
CI-GSU
Reps: 39
Counselors are usually great in these situations. Utilizing the counselor and the parents could only help the situation and help the student to become more open.
  Posted on: July 3, 2013 12:21 am

Laura Toft
Laura Toft
Reps: 71
School counselors and the ESOL teacher will be instrumental in helping this child adapt to his new lifestyle. By encouraging other students to be friendly and helping him I think he will have an easier time adjusting to his new school.
  Posted on: June 2, 2014 9:34 pm

Nicole Turner
Nicole Turner
Reps: 70
School counselor is a great idea to involve. They are trained to handle these situations and could better assist the teacher as well on how to make that student feel more comfortable within the classroom.
  Posted on: June 4, 2015 8:44 pm

yteduM
yteduM
Reps: 77
School Counselors are great resources when dealing with issues like this. The counselor may know someone in the community who speaks Japanese that would help translate. The counselor also has more time to sit with the student and make them feel comfortable with their surroundings. Sometimes a walk around the building or outside for a few minutes can calm a child and change their whole attitude for the day.
  Posted on: June 5, 2015 4:24 pm

Alyssa Wright
Alyssa Wright
Reps: 69
Meeting with a counselor and translator who can talk with the student about how he feels may be the first step that should occur. I think also the teacher should make time for a few minutes a day to spend with the student one-on-one.
  Posted on: June 6, 2015 4:40 am

yBySuL
yBySuL
Reps: 70
The school counselor may have some one they could speak with as far as creating some bridge of communication with the child. It is terrifying for adults so I can't imagine how bad it is for a child.
  Posted on: June 8, 2015 3:43 am

Daisy Dumler
Daisy Dumler
Reps: 106
The school counselor would be a great liaison in this situation.
  Posted on: October 19, 2015 1:30 am

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Solution 4
Posted December 8, 2012 11:53 am

Suzi Hancock
Suzi Hancock
Reps: 134
It's hard to offer up something original to this issue! I agree with most people about finding ways to make you and the student feel more comfortable in the classroom. I really like the idea of having the parents come in and introduce some of their culture, such as food or books, to the class. I think this will make the student feel welcome and proud! I like the idea of writing a letter to a friend. This is a chance for the class to make a pen pal.

Since the student is so young, transitioning should be a little easier for him than if he were in middle or high school.

I would recommend finding some sort of Japanese to English resource that you could use in your classroom. I like the idea of labeling classroom items in both languages.

Patience and compassion are necessary factors in your teaching style at this point. Just don't panic, and you will both find your rhythm.
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Comments posted for this solution

Johnnie Skelton
Johnnie Skelton
Reps: 104
Yes, I think that labeling items would be a great start. I believe that there may be an iPad / iPod app that translates verbally. Just the ability to talk to those around him would probably make a big difference.
  Posted on: June 4, 2013 3:35 pm

vezaMu
vezaMu
Reps: 85
That is a great suggestion to bring some Japanese into class.
  Posted on: June 6, 2013 1:38 pm

CI-GSU
CI-GSU
Reps: 39
Bring the culture to the class as much as possible would be great and a great learning experience.
  Posted on: July 3, 2013 12:26 am

dyTuDu
dyTuDu
Reps: 103
I also use iTranslate on the iPad for students who do not speak English. I think this is a great way for students to express themselves. Maybe he could meet with your school counselor using this app so that he or she can give him coping skills for this huge transition. Also, if his parents allow, maybe he can Skype or communicate at designated times with his old classmates. It is probably the feeling of being so far away and completely cut off from them that is causing him the distress and this could help him see that there are still ways to "see" them and communicate even far away.
  Posted on: March 15, 2015 2:21 pm

Amanda Morris
Amanda Morris
Reps: 70
I love the idea of labeling everything in the classroom. We need to make this child feel comfortable in his surroundings. This will also help him pick up a some of our language. Use it as a teaching tool. I could not imagine going to a school and not understanding anything.
  Posted on: June 2, 2015 12:14 pm

Sarah Davis
Sarah Davis
Reps: 69
I like your idea of implementing a Japanese/English translator program within the classroom. This would provide a great tool for everyone in the class. As others have suggested, I like the idea of incorporating Japanese symbols in the classroom for the student to feel more comfortable. As you noted, compassion and patience are both vital to make this transition easier for the student.
  Posted on: June 4, 2015 6:46 pm

Meagan Cook
Meagan Cook
Reps: 53
I highly agree with the patience component. That truly could be the factor that makes him feel welcome in the classroom.
  Posted on: June 4, 2015 11:20 pm

zyWyma
zyWyma
Reps: 70
Labeling the items in both languages is an excellent idea. This provides an educational experience for all the students. This can help open up elements for communication for all the students as well, and bring all the students closer together.
  Posted on: June 7, 2015 5:07 am

Brad McMahon
Brad McMahon
Reps: 71
There are two ideas here that I like. I think writing letters is a good idea, and that establishing a connection with the student's former teacher could establish pen pals for both classes. This is very interesting and I think would be beneficial. I also think labeling classroom items in two languages is a good idea. This will help the student learn to recognize the English words and will be educational for the other students as well.
  Posted on: June 8, 2015 4:37 am

Edward Kim
Edward Kim
Reps: 106
Like you I also think that labeling things in both languages would be a great idea. While the students are working on something that does not require your full attention, you could walk around the room with the student and help him pronounce different items. While doing this you would be able to learn some Japanese while the student learns English. Its a win-win situation.
  Posted on: October 11, 2015 2:00 pm

ezajaV
ezajaV
Reps: 102
I really like your idea of labeling items in the classroom. I think that will help him transition better.
  Posted on: October 12, 2015 11:52 am

Kateline Vaughn
Kateline Vaughn
Reps: 106
I like the idea of the parents coming in to share things with the class about Japan and Japanese culture. This could be an opportunity for other students to learn about their son, since he does not verbally communicate with the other students.
  Posted on: October 13, 2015 4:20 pm

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Solution 5
Posted June 5, 2013 10:00 pm

Carol Whitfield
Carol Whitfield
Reps: 56
This is a very interesting story. I suggest that teacher researches Japanese culture on her own. At the end, a teacher has to keep learning so he or she can improve in the classroom. I would even suggest meeting with administration. Administration's job is to bring someone in the school that can accommodate that child's needs. I would also suggest being very warm and welcoming to the class and possibly even having the children learn about Japanese culture. For instance, the students could have a homework assignment that insisted that they learn a new word in Japanese.
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Comments posted for this solution

Kyle Chambers
Kyle Chambers
Reps: 68
Carol,

I agree that the administration should be brought in to help the student. In that way, there are multiple ideas and perspectives on how to help the student feel comfortable in the classroom. The administration could also help communicate with the parents when they are available.
  Posted on: June 9, 2013 8:46 pm

yVyLyG
yVyLyG
Reps: 69
I also agree that the administration should be involved. Clearly there are some serious issues with emotions at play, and the teacher is in need of professional support and assistance form the school in order to accommodate the student's transition and adaption. THis should not be something the teacher should be trying to spearhead on their own.
  Posted on: June 9, 2013 10:55 pm

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Solution 6
Posted December 3, 2012 9:12 pm

Jessica DeLaigle
Jessica DeLaigle
Reps: 110
I have had a child in my class this year that did the exact same thing. The most important thing you can do is to place yourself in their shoes. Think about how scary it would be to be so young, all alone, speaking a different language, in a new school, with new teachers and classmates. Another thing you can do is to allow the parents to come in one day and do a special group time or read a book in Japanese or make Japanese food, something to expose the other children to his culture. It will get the other children excited to learn more about him. It will also give him the confidence and self-esteem he needs. Also, if there is a certain thing in your classroom you have noticed he likes or is interested in, bring it out whenever he gets upset. As much as he needs to be doing what the class is doing, when he gets extremely upset, allow him the opportunity to do something else, like write a letter to a friend back home or draw a picture for his parents. Eventually, he will get more comfortable and won't cry.
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eDaNep
eDaNep
Reps: 66
Putting yourself into a child's shoes should be a solution for many problems teachers face. Understanding a student's perspective can give us insight that will help us be patient and find solutions that will benefit an individual child's situation.
  Posted on: June 4, 2013 8:18 am

Love Joy
Love Joy
Reps: 78
It has always been said that the best way to incorporate someone into feeling at ease and to make them feel welcomed is to bring food, a card, or a gift. Having the class make a card(s) for the student will give the student time to take each one home and read to see that he/she is loved. It is also a good idea to incorporate the food because this allows the student to be able to do something that no one else can do or know about making the student feel comfortable. This way classmates can ask the parents questions about the cooking process and the food so they can relay the messages to the student so the student will know that classmates really care and want to know. This will open up many conversations and eventually show the new student that they are not alone in not knowing everything. All students have a void that needs filling.
  Posted on: June 9, 2013 8:34 pm

Amanda Morris
Amanda Morris
Reps: 70
I love the idea of having the parents come in a read or do activities with the class. Even though the parents do work, I am sure they can take off a day to help their child feel more comfortable with his surroundings. I think it would also be neat if his parents could teach the class a few words in Japanese. This way the students could communicate with him some. Maybe teach some of his favorite things.
  Posted on: June 2, 2015 12:20 pm

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Solution 7
Posted February 11, 2013 10:44 am

Erin Iler
Erin Iler
Reps: 22
I think that a main reason behind his crying results from a feeling of loneliness.Moving to a new school district can be a scary thing for a child much less an entirely new country. He probably feels very distant from everyone at the school because of the major distinctions in the language barrier. I know that Japanese is usually not a popular language for ELL teachers to know, so the lack of a common ground would also make the student feel secluded socially and in result will make the student upset. It probably is true that the child misses his friends back in Japan and because of this I think that it would be very beneficial for the teacher to play some games with the class that help introduce the students and help form a close knit classroom community. As the student gradually feels more welcomed, he should stop crying and in result the class will remain on task due to no interruption. If the student continues to cry, I would suggest having a meeting with the parents with the help of a translator if applicable to discuss any underlying issues the child may be dealing with.
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Brittany Smith
Brittany Smith
Reps: 69
A translator would be very helpful, and I think there should be some kind of communication with the parents. I think the best thing that the teacher could do in this situation is find a way to relate to the student. Since they cannot communicate verbally, music and art would be the best ways to go about doing this. The teacher needs to research the different cultural values of the student, and while the teacher should not have to learn an entire language, he or she could learn a few Japanese words and phrases that could reach out and comfort this student. This would require working with him on a daily basis, but it would definitely produce more positive results in the long run.
  Posted on: June 4, 2013 3:49 pm

VyQaqu
VyQaqu
Reps: 71
I agree with you diagnosis of loneliness. A young student who feels isolated and totally apart from what is going on in the classroom is very sad. I cannot imagine being that lonely with so many people around; especially when I can remember a place where I felt the exact opposite not so long ago.
  Posted on: June 8, 2013 6:04 pm

Kimberly Spicer
Kimberly Spicer
Reps: 71
In addition to having a meeting with the parents and a translator, I would also have the student sit in on the meeting. Then, all the adults and the student can discuss what they can possibly do to make the child more comfortable. Maybe the parents can bring some things from home to show the teacher and the teacher can share them with the class. I am sure the student has some common interests with some of the other students in the class...they need to just figure out what they are.
  Posted on: June 9, 2013 9:14 pm

Stormye Brantley
Stormye Brantley
Reps: 121
I agree with your solution. I think some kind of game or activity can help open the door to finding new friends. Having a conference with the parents and a translator may also be helpful. I did not consider getting the advise of an ELL teacher either-- great ideas!
  Posted on: October 14, 2013 8:18 pm

BazuTy
BazuTy
Reps: 116
Yes, additional support is the essential thing that is needed. It takes a village to raise a child. lol
  Posted on: October 20, 2013 9:14 pm

avuNaD
avuNaD
Reps: 36
I agree with your post and solution! I think that there are other issues as to why the student is crying and I do think that it has to do with that he does miss friends but I also think that it has to a lot with being in a new setting and not knowing anyone. I love how you talked about that Japanese is not spoken a lot throughout the ELL community and with ELL teachers. I am all for students playing ice breakers! This gets the students engaged and hopefully the new student will open up. If not then at least he will start to at least feel comfortable around the other students and then eventually he will open up and I think he will start participating with the class.
  Posted on: June 2, 2015 1:25 am

Monica Rainwater
Monica Rainwater
Reps: 71
I agree with you. I think most of the crying is stemming from loneliness and lack of friendships. One idea that could help to alleviate his loneliness is to set up a pen pal with and one of his former classmates in Japan. Also, it would be a great idea for me as the teacher to study up on the Japanese culture and their educational system, and try to begin to incorporate some those things into our everyday routine. If I can make his surroundings feel a little more "like home," then maybe he will begin to feel a sense of security where he can begin to let his guard down.
  Posted on: June 2, 2015 3:11 pm

ehyNyn
ehyNyn
Reps: 109
I totally agree with meeting with the parents. Often, immigrant students come over and have some things in their past that may negatively affect them in the United States (things like seeing war). Also, it might be necessary to just talk to the student and find something in which the teacher has in common. Right now, this student is missing home (friends, country, and culture).
  Posted on: October 18, 2015 2:03 pm

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Solution 8
Posted June 4, 2013 11:58 am

Nicki Kinner
Nicki Kinner
Reps: 68
For a young child to be put in this kind of situation is extremely overwhelming. He has been taken away from his friends and has none in his new environment because he cannot understand what anyone is saying. Even though the both parents have full time jobs it is important for them to be active in the student’s education. Obviously, if the student is continuously crying he is not learning and that makes it hard for the whole class to stay focused. I would have a meeting with the parents and discuss what we should do together. I would then research the student’s background and heritage so I could incorporate it in some of my lessons. This will make the students better understand who this new student is and it will also make the new student feel more comfortable in the classroom.
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Kelly Jackson
Kelly Jackson
Reps: 103
I completely agree with your plan of action. Bringing in a ELL co-teacher and/or help from the school counselor could expedite student success for building relationships.
  Posted on: June 9, 2013 10:41 pm

Meredith Bryant
Meredith Bryant
Reps: 106
I am glad you chose to present a strategy that is not geared more around his feelings, but about what he deserves. First, I think meeting with the parents as much as possible is a great idea. They need to know his daily progress in order to help him feel more connected. They can even explain to him at home the situation and the strategies that you, as the teacher, are doing in class to help him. They can reach him in ways that no one else can. The second thing I would do, is talk to my administration. As a student, he is entitled to an equal education. How can he achieve this if he does not understand your English and you do not understand his Japanese. Where is the ELL teacher?! Have your administration also help you formulate a plan to help best educate this student.
  Posted on: October 19, 2013 9:24 pm

Kaitlin Stringer
Kaitlin Stringer
Reps: 116
I like your idea of meeting with the parents, but since they are working full time, I don't know if they will be able to stop his crying. I think a better idea would be to have him attend what we call a "lunch bunch" at our school. A small group of students brings their lunch and eats with the guidance counselor. During this time, the students talk about feelings or other social skills. Perhaps getting to know some go his classmates in a smaller setting would allow him to feel more at home.
  Posted on: June 2, 2015 3:14 pm

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Solution 9
Posted June 5, 2013 9:52 am

Emilee Roberts
Emilee Roberts
Reps: 69
I cannot imagine how difficult it must be to move to a different country and speak a totally different language. It is terrifying enough to move to a different school that your native language is spoken; however, this little boy speaks zero English. I think that the classroom teacher should speak with his parents to allow him to bring a comfort item with him to school. I think this could help him find a safe place amoung the unfamiliar. I also think that it could benefit this student if the classroom teacher would implement picture learning of new words. This can be done through books, posters, videos, and flashcards. This will help him learn the English equivalent to the Japaneese word. I think that this would help the other students learn a few Japennese words so they can communicate with him as well. These situations take time. So be patient!
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L. Carrell
L. Carrell
Reps: 63
Your idea about bringing in an item from home should help to calm the student and take his mind off being sad. I also like your idea for using pictures to learn the English language and to help him to relate to what he already knows and is familiar with.
  Posted on: June 9, 2013 9:05 pm

Nick Hanna
Nick Hanna
Reps: 71
I like your solution, because I believe they are both great ideas for an elementary school student. By having the student bring in a "comfort" item should help the student and as long as its not a huge item, it will more than like go mainly unnoticed by other students. Your solution about using images in the classroom is a great beginning step to helping the student get more comfortable academically.
  Posted on: June 5, 2014 4:50 am

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Solution 10
Posted June 9, 2013 7:22 pm

Erin Ashurst
Erin Ashurst
Reps: 73
The student is obviously struggling with being in a new country and being unable to communicate with his classmates or teachers. I would try to establish hand signals and gestures with the student so that we could have minimal communication. I would see if the student could read or write any English as well. Next, I would ask the student's parents to teach me a few phrases in Japanese. Next, I would talk to the guidance counselor about having a session with the student; I believe play therapy would really open the student up. Next, I would ask for a peer tutor from my class; this student would sit with the Japanese student and keep him company in class. I would encourage my class to empathize with the student and think of ways as a class to make him feel welcomed. Lastly, I would encourage all teachers to watch the film My Brown Eyes by Jay Koh. It is a great film, which puts the viewer in the students of an immigrant child on their first day of school without knowing English.
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Hope Crosby
Hope Crosby
Reps: 122
Great idea to have the parents teach the teacher a few basic phrases to help with instruction and communication. I also think that involving the guidance counselor is a good idea since there is obviously a lot going on with the child's emotions.




  Posted on: October 18, 2013 6:43 pm

Susan Esra
Susan Esra
Reps: 68
I would love to watch the film- thanks for the recommendation! I have been in other countries in which I didn't speak the language, but in all circumstances there was at least one person in my group that could communicate. I cannot imagine how overwhelming it would be to not be able to communicate at all.
  Posted on: June 5, 2014 2:44 am

Caley Copeland
Caley Copeland
Reps: 69
I like your idea of hand signals or gestures because sign language can be universal. I think it is great that you are also asking the parents to teach you important phrases in Japanese. When the students sees you trying to learn his culture it will make him feel more comfortable in your classroom.
  Posted on: June 6, 2014 3:26 am

egyveW
egyveW
Reps: 103
Those were some really great ideas. I think that the signals and gestures would be very helpful in the situation, and I also think that getting the class involved in making the student feel welcomed and empathizing with this student would really help.
  Posted on: October 19, 2014 11:53 am

Melissa Aspinwall
Melissa Aspinwall
Reps: 79
I like the idea you shared of watching the video that portrays an immigrant's first day in a new school in a new country. That would be of great help for everyone.
  Posted on: June 7, 2015 5:21 am

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Solution 11
Posted June 7, 2014 2:22 pm

Tiffany Parker
Tiffany Parker
Reps: 69
I think he cries every day, not only because he misses his friends, but also because he feels as if no one will ever understand him. It must be extremely hard for a young child to move here and not know the English language. The crying could be very distracting for other students; therefore, I would try to work with my students to learn short phrases in the Japanese language. I think this would allow the new student to communicate with his/her peers in the classroom. This process might make the new student feel more comfortable and "at home" within the classroom.
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Jill Elton
Jill Elton
Reps: 108
I agree with your tactic of incorporating the Japanese language into the daily classroom routine. This will help, not only the new student to feel more "at home", it will also broaden the horizons of all of the students and help them become more "worldly." With this in mind, the teacher could use this opportunity to apply a multitude of second grade objectives to allow leaning more about Japan and the Japanese culture, etc.
  Posted on: October 12, 2015 1:34 am

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Solution 12
Posted December 7, 2012 8:49 pm

Art Buff
Art Buff
Reps: 111
He is a second grade student from Japan. He is young and alone in school. He is not only outside of his home but he is away from everything (culture, family, friends,...etc.) This is a situation only fixed with time. Parents need to be involved to help the student cope at home so that he may have better control of his emotions while at school. You could also take a day in your lesson plan and talk about different aspects of Japan (culture, cities, people)this way the class can have a better understanding of how difficult it is for the new student. Maybe students could come up with one neat thing they learned about Japan. These kinds of things can definitely help to make a new student feel like a real part of the class and that he will be ok.
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VyQaqu
VyQaqu
Reps: 71
I agree with you. The parents need to become involved because the teacher and the rest of the faculty need help with this situation. The parent's know what is best for the students so to make interventions for the student without the input of the parents would possibly be detrimental to the student's progress.
  Posted on: June 8, 2013 6:01 pm

Kristen Bagwell
Kristen Bagwell
Reps: 107
You make some valid points. Another suggestion may be you, as the teacher, doing some research about school life in Japan; that way, he may feel more comfortable or you may understand better why he is upset. Additionally, I don't think it would be a bad idea to contact the counselor. There needs to be someone in the building who this child can talk with, which may mean getting a a translator or something.
  Posted on: October 4, 2015 3:43 pm

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Solution 13
Posted December 7, 2012 5:45 pm

Laine Vilardi
Laine Vilardi
Reps: 119
I can't imagine what it's like to move to a new country away from everything you know, especially at such a young age. If he misses his friends, maybe you can have him do a pen-pal activity where he gets to write to his friends in Japan and send them photos of himself at school. Maybe your school counselor could be beneficial in this situation. Maybe he or she can take him out of the classroom setting to help calm him down. It has to be rough making such a big move, he might just need some time to adjust.
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Brittany Smith
Brittany Smith
Reps: 69
I love the idea of the pen-pal activity! Aside from trying to incorporate Japanese culture into the classroom, this would be a great way to help him stay encouraged. I think that having the teacher work with the student individually would also be a big help once the teacher is more aware of Japanese cultural practices.
  Posted on: June 4, 2013 3:52 pm

Erin Ashurst
Erin Ashurst
Reps: 73
I really love the idea of a pen-pal activity. It would teach students about other cultures and a chance to practice writing skills learned in class. Also, it'd be great for the Japanese students to share with his friends in Japan what he's learning. It would definitely help boost his confidence and motivate him.
  Posted on: June 9, 2013 7:30 pm

Jordyn Nail
Jordyn Nail
Reps: 108
Great idea! In his pen-pal correspondence he can include new words or traditions he has learned from his peers. He can also share words and traditions with his classmates.
  Posted on: October 20, 2013 12:49 pm

Nick Hanna
Nick Hanna
Reps: 71
Wow! Great idea about the pen-pal activity for the student to help him adjust, I never thought out that solution. I am sure it would help the student coop and it would give him something to look forward to at school and at home. I also strongly agree that the counselor should be involved, because this is a for sure part of their job. Thanks for the post!
  Posted on: June 12, 2014 2:30 pm

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Solution 14
Posted December 7, 2012 11:41 pm

areli saucedo
areli saucedo
Reps: 119
This sounds like a very complicated issue. Clearly, the student is having a emotional disclosure concerning his recent move to a different country. He is traumatized in a way and has not yet learned how to cope with it, I would suggest that you read Igoa, "inner world of an Immigrant Child" and see the different methods that you can help this child adjust to his new setting, also I would take the liberty to inform the child's parents about the issue, I would tell them to come to my office to speak to me about the reasons why the child is having such a hard time integrating.
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Nicki Kinner
Nicki Kinner
Reps: 68
I would definitely ask the parents to have a meeting with me. It is important to work together to fix the problem. It also would be a good idea to incorporate the administrations opinion on how to handle the situation.
  Posted on: June 4, 2013 12:04 pm

gyjyjy
gyjyjy
Reps: 71
I also feel that it would be a great idea to include the counselor and the adminstraters in on the situation. I would try to find out what services we could offer to the kid or programs available. I would then set up a parent-teacher conference to discuss the problems. I also thought that you could have resources in the classroom that our about Japan to make him feel a little more included.
  Posted on: June 9, 2013 8:44 pm

aTejyh
aTejyh
Reps: 22
Yes I think that a conference with the parents would be a great way to begin to understand the student. Some emotional behavior is expected! I mean he is in second grade and moved to a new country where he knows no one. I think that reading the book and also incorporating some of his culture into the classroom is a way to work toward him feeling more comfortable.
  Posted on: June 28, 2013 11:34 am

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Solution 15
Posted December 8, 2012 7:49 pm

Amari Hagan
Amari Hagan
Reps: 115
I would first ask his parents on some advice to what I should do to eliminate the crying at school. If they give me advice I would used them. If those advices don’t work I would have a one on one time with him while using some kind of technology translator. I will try to see why it is that he’s crying so much. I would then try to implement some types of Japanese culture in to my lessons to make him feel welcome and to accept his new friends. I believe he just missed home (Japan) and may feel he is not welcome as well as afraid because he don’t speak English.
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Heidi Landon
Heidi Landon
Reps: 58
Incorporating parents in the process whether through telephone or notes is a great idea. They may be able to provide some hints or tips to help relax him in the classroom. They may also be able to give you insight to some thing they may hear at home from him which could better help you at school.
  Posted on: June 4, 2013 1:51 am

Kimberly Rahn
Kimberly Rahn
Reps: 70
I agree with you. His parents need to be as involved as they possibly can;however, it is going to be up to the teacher and the school to help him make the adjustment at school. I believe that if the teacher is nurturing and shows him tht she cares, he will eventually feel safe in his new environment,.
  Posted on: June 4, 2014 12:33 am

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Solution 16
Posted February 10, 2013 9:08 pm

London Ritchie
London Ritchie
Reps: 47
One of the solutions I would try first is to talk to the students family about possible activities that they do at home, that you could do in the classroom to make the student feel more comfortable. I think that he cries everyday because he cannot relate to the children around him because of his language barrier. Maybe with the class you could teach the students some Japanese words that the other students could use with this child. To help stop the crying you could arrange for him to bring in pictures of his friends from back home. When he starts to cry tell him that he can sit in the reading area and look at the pictures. You could even assign a project so they could write letters back and forth to each other. This could be a very sticky situation, but with the right tools I think that you can make this student feel comfortable.
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aQazuV
aQazuV
Reps: 105
I love your ideas. I think it is a great idea to allow the student to bring in pictures of his friends and look at them when he is feeling down. I also think it is a great idea to teach the students (and yourself) some Japanese words to use with the students. Simple "greeting" expressions in Japanese would be great. I think the student would feel better if he/she had a little piece of home with him at school. It is all about being compassionate and understanding.
  Posted on: October 15, 2014 10:04 pm

vasere
vasere
Reps: 70
Continuing to talk to the parents is an excellent suggestion. Make sure you make it clear that you are doing this to help their child, not out of disappointment or anger. Even this gesture will probably help the parents feel more welcomed. I think allowing him to bring pictures in is a good idea. This could be comforting, as well as an outlet for language practice. You could bring in pictures of your family, too, and you could sit down to talk about them, pointing to similarities in each one.
  Posted on: June 3, 2015 2:56 am

Meagan Cook
Meagan Cook
Reps: 53
I love incorporating home into the classroom. And maybe you could have him write letters to a middle or high school student in the cluster from Japan so that he would have a US connection but they understand what he is feeling. You could also use this as his writing assignments to adapt the curriculum for his understanding during this transition.
  Posted on: June 4, 2015 11:21 pm

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Solution 17
Posted February 17, 2013 2:10 pm

Shanda Hall
Shanda Hall
Reps: 29
Bless this students’ heart. He has not had time to adapt yet. Not only is he at a new school, but he is around student’s that speak a totally different language as well. I would try to communicate with him someway and also bring some of his culture into the classroom in some way. I would try my best to help him to feel safe and comfortable within the classroom so he will want to stay and learn and make new friends.
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Carol Whitfield
Carol Whitfield
Reps: 56
I agree. Bringing his culture into the classroom is a great idea. I feel as if the teacher should introduce a new culture each week just so he or she isn't specifically pointing his culture out. Learning about others never hurt anyone, and I feel as if this is the best way to make the child feel warm, safe, and comfortable.
  Posted on: June 6, 2013 10:29 am

Krissy Chance-Bailey
Krissy Chance-Bailey
Reps: 65
I think if the teacher would send the student to the counselors office or to a place that calms him down it would no distract the other students with his crying. Sometimes having a grown up who he can just go sit with to calm down will help.
  Posted on: June 12, 2014 12:54 pm

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Solution 18
Posted July 1, 2013 8:08 pm

Kimberly Stuckey
Kimberly Stuckey
Reps: 18
Moving to a new place can be intimidating for any child or individual. However, in this case, the student’s inability to communicate with peers, teachers, and staff adds a monumental obstacle to building new relationships and thriving in the learning environment. The child is largely confused and frustrated with his predicament. Crying is a behavior that he uses to communicate his sadness, confusion, and frustration. Therefore, initially, I would have the counselor, parents, ESOL teacher, and classroom teachers discuss an action plan to address the crying behavior and transition the student to the new school/environment. This plan could include providing the student with a peer mentor, accommodating assignments/surroundings to provide both English and Japanese, practice hand gestures/sign language to communicate, offer strategies to soothe the child, and opportunities for the family to educate the class on the Japanese culture. By openly discussing their differences/similarities all involved will become more comfortable.
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Emily Wood
Emily Wood
Reps: 19
I agree Kimberly. The crying that doesn't cease is the child's form of expression. He is obviously upset or uncomfortable during instructional time. I like the idea of offering a peer tutor. I feel that this is just what the child needs, a friend.
  Posted on: July 2, 2013 1:17 pm

Caley Copeland
Caley Copeland
Reps: 69
I can’t imagine what this child would be feeling, but I would recommend the same thing. I would speak with the counselor, ESOL teacher, and the parents to form a plan to comfort him and help him assimilate. I like your idea of hand gestures because I think this would be easy for him to learn.
  Posted on: June 6, 2014 3:29 am

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Solution 19
Posted July 2, 2013 1:57 pm

Emily Wood
Emily Wood
Reps: 19
This student is at a crucial age where "growing up" occurs. Students are no longer assisted in their every need. Because of this transition as well as the transition of moving from one location (Japan) to one that is unknown and uncomfortable (US). I feel that he cries everyday because of the separation he is experiencing from his "friends" as well as his family. You family is a safety-net that offers comfort and understanding that no others can extend. I suggest allowing this student extra time with others in order to create a relationship between him and his peers. This can be accomplished by assigning him a "buddy." This person would complete activities/play with him during free time or recess. Journaling could be a great outlet for this young man. When he becomes upset allow him time to write, draw, or color in his journal about the way in which he is feeling.
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Virginia Erbele
Virginia Erbele
Reps: 25
I think assigning him a “buddy” or two could be very useful, especially if they are chosen specifically for their desire and ability to be helpful. Feeling some sort of connection with his classmates would help him feel less like an outsider. I also really like the idea of journaling. He could free write in his native language and try some English words as well.
  Posted on: July 3, 2013 8:33 am

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Solution 20
Posted June 2, 2014 3:45 pm

Kristen Eason
Kristen Eason
Reps: 57
There is definitely a much bigger issue going on other than he misses his friends. I believe the student is completely out of his comfort zone and doesn’t have a clue what’s going on. I can’t imagine sending my kids to school in a foreign county and not being able to speak the language. The teacher needs to insure the student that the classroom in a positive learning environment and that everyone there works together as a family. The teacher also need think about setting the student up with a peer that can help him around the school, with his assignments, and help make other new friends. The teacher also needs to dig deep and find out what the student enjoys doing. It might be reading, drawing, playing a musical instrument, or playing a sport. If the student has something positive to look forward to each day at school, this can reduce this ability to continually cry.
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Rachel Walker
Rachel Walker
Reps: 60
I couldn’t imagine sending my child, or myself, into a school where they didn’t know the language. I would probably be crying most every day too! I like the idea you have about pairing the Japanese student up with a peer to help guide them through school. I think that having the teacher become more knowledge about the Japanese student’s likes, dislikes, passions, etc. would be extremely helpful in trying to get him to engage in the classroom. Overall I really like all of your suggestions and think that they would work well.
  Posted on: June 3, 2014 4:02 am

Ashley Mays
Ashley Mays
Reps: 64
I agree with your solution. The teacher can also adjust some of the material through google translate to help translate directions into Japanese for the child. This may help the child ease into the workload.
  Posted on: June 6, 2014 8:32 pm

HyraLe
HyraLe
Reps: 73
I like your idea about explaining to the student that the students and teacher in the classroom can act as his family. I'm sure he feels so lonely being that his parents work a lot too. He probably does feel scared and by making him feel a sense of belonging and that people in the classroom care about him should make him feel a little better. I also think your suggestion of finding out what he likes to do would also help out a lot.
  Posted on: October 27, 2014 7:01 am

Alyssa Wright
Alyssa Wright
Reps: 69
I agree that the teacher should build on an interest the student has. Even if it is making time to draw with the student for five minutes a day a relationship is being built. I think if the student begins to feel more comfortable he will open up about how he is feeling.
  Posted on: June 6, 2015 4:42 am

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Solution 21
Posted June 4, 2014 12:29 am

Kimberly Rahn
Kimberly Rahn
Reps: 70
This poor child is having some major culture shock issues. As his classroom teacher, there are many things that you could do to try and help him feel more comfortable. First, show him as much love and nurturing as possible. Try and make him feel secure and hopefully he will begin to feel comfortable with his new teacher and his surroundings. Possibly talk to the the other children and encourage them to interact with him as much as possible so that he will also feel comfortable with them as well. This also I believe would require the school counselor to get involved in possibly helping him with his emotions. I could try and work as close with his parents as I possibly could to ensure that this child begins to adapt and gets the education and language skills he needs to succeed in our country. I would have him interact with the ESOL teacher at the school as much as possible.
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Hannah Nabors
Hannah Nabors
Reps: 68
Kimberly,
I like your team approach, involving the ESOL teacher, counselor, and the child's parents in the problem solving. Great way to introduce a group effort. I believe the student will be able to recognize your efforts to comfort him, despite the language battle, as much of this can be conveyed by actions and body language. One thing to keep in mind, as far as communicating with the boys parents, is to communicate on the positive aspects not just the negative ones. I'm sure his parents would be thrilled to hear about the positive strides towards adjustment that he makes/is making. Though they are a valuable tool for helping to alleviate the child's discomfort, like any parent, I imagine that want to also be involved when things start running more smoothly.
  Posted on: June 5, 2014 8:01 pm

Tiffany Parker
Tiffany Parker
Reps: 69
I think it is a great idea for the teacher to nurture the student and create an "at home" atmosphere for the student! This process would help the student open up and begin to communicate with his/her teacher. I think it would also be a great idea to get the students to involve the new student in many activities.
  Posted on: June 7, 2014 2:24 pm

Myzusy
Myzusy
Reps: 113
Kimberly, you have some great ideas! Working as a collaborative team with the ESOL teacher and the guidance teacher are fantastic ideas. The three of you will be able to come up with an effective plan to help the student adapt to the classroom. I also like the idea of creating a classroom environment that was similar to the students environment in Japan. Perhaps the family could provide pictures or other decorative items from home to help the student. I also suggest that you get the student involved in creating his "Japanese classroom" by drawing pictures or selecting music that could be played. You could even find out what type of fragrances remind the student of home for example apple pie reminds me of my Grandma's house so I have a scented candle that smells like apple pie that I light when I need a pick me up. Seeing, smelling and touching things that are comforting to the student will make him feel more at home at school.
  Posted on: October 16, 2014 4:39 pm

ReMuXy
ReMuXy
Reps: 78
I think it is important to show him love. I also said that I would get the school counselor involved. However, I think you will have to have a translator/parent to be in the meeting with the counselor. I like your idea about interacting with other ESL students, however, I think that putting him with any student that you trust would be a good idea.
  Posted on: June 3, 2015 12:17 pm

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Solution 22
Posted June 4, 2014 2:54 pm

Hannah Nabors
Hannah Nabors
Reps: 68
Bless his heart, it sounds like this student is having a hard time with his family's recent move. I'm sure this only exasperates the challenges you are experiencing as his teacher, having to acclimate to 2nd grade after 20 years of 4th-5th graders. I think the first thing you should do, is a little background work on Japanese culture. Are there stark differences? What is the same? What sort of classroom learning environment is this student familiar with based on his previous school. You may find, for example, that the student is used to a lot of writing and written directions, as opposed to oral instruction.

As for the crying, however difficult, remember that at least the student is communicating...expressing his uneasiness. Though you may be able to learn some simple Japanese phrases, I think you can also comfort the student non-verbally. Find universal activities that don't involve the language barrier. For example, try using recognizable manipulatives in math. If you are working on subtraction, have the students work the problem out recognizable items from both cultures. Also, remember that play is a universal language. Help the child get involved at recess with his peers. A simple ball and a open field can go a long way in building unspoken friendships. I believe that as the child becomes more comfortable in your class, he will open up more and limit his crying. Good luck!
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Jennifer Loncon
Jennifer Loncon
Reps: 68
I like that you pointed out that his crying is him communicating. I did not think of that. Hopefully he will get more comfortable soon and will start to communicate in alternative ways.
  Posted on: June 6, 2014 2:01 am

aHeRaL
aHeRaL
Reps: 112
You make an interesting point to include crying as a form of communication. Certainly the boy is out of his comfort zone and may not feel as if there is another or better way to communicate his feelings. Also, as a second grader, he may not be aware of any better way to communicate those feelings of uneasiness in the new classroom and culture. Your ideas of creating situations where language is not needed (math or play) seem like would work well to help include the student and hopefully make him feel more comfortable with his classmates and his classmates with him.
  Posted on: October 14, 2014 7:12 pm

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Solution 23
Posted June 4, 2014 11:13 pm

Amy Fletcher
Amy Fletcher
Reps: 67
I think that this little boy does miss his friends and doesn't know how to make new friends in the US. As a teacher I think it is very important to try and connect with the student when he starts crying. A good start would be to give the student some art supplies and have him create something that may help you figure out what is wrong with him. Another suggestion would be to have some of the students in the class teach him a fun game and maybe this will help him get to know other students. Helping the student do something that is comfortable for him may help him adjust better to the US as well as meet some new friends to decrease his crying spells in class.
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wendy burns
wendy burns
Reps: 80
I like this idea! When students write and draw they are expressing their inner-most thoughts and I think this would help this child tremendously. The teacher and peers could have conversations with him about what he writes and his illustrations he draws. This would help them make connections to what he is thinking and things that are important to him.
  Posted on: June 7, 2014 1:59 pm

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Solution 24
Posted June 5, 2014 10:47 pm

LeeAnna Elder
LeeAnna Elder
Reps: 75
Every class every grade even pre-K and kindergarten has that one student who is a genuenly nice, kind, caring individual. It might help if the Japanese student is paired up with that one student. However, this will not fully fix the crying problem. May be if the teacher allowed the student to draw a picture describing why he is crying might communicate the real reason. It is true that there may be a deeper root cause to the crying. It is also one of the phases this child is going through to adapt to his new life in a new culture, and away from all his friends and familiarity from Japan.
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Solution 25
Posted December 6, 2012 7:41 pm

Jessica Jacobs Graham
Jessica Jacobs Graham
Reps: 116
Find out what calms him down. Set up a private place in your classroom where he can go to if he is missing his friends or anything else is bothering him. Encourage him to write letters to his friends or to journal about his feelings, even if it is Japanese. He has to have outlets for his anxiety. Maybe he needs to speak with the counselor when he gets upset. Above all, you should not make him feel as though he is in trouble when he cries. You should also explain to your other students that it is ok for him to be upset and that they can be understanding. Support him in any way that you can.
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yheraZ
yheraZ
Reps: 68
I like your idea about the journal of feelings and I think this could really be effective; you could even use this as a place for the student to practice his English writing skills (not rushing him of course). I defiantly think you are correct in your statement that you should not make the student feel as though he is in trouble when he cries, you should let him know that it is ok to be upset sometimes.
  Posted on: June 3, 2013 9:45 pm

ePeHyM
ePeHyM
Reps: 105
I agree that the teacher should not make the student fell as if he is in trouble when he cries and that it is a good opportunity to teach the rest of the class that it is okay to get upset sometimes.
  Posted on: October 12, 2014 10:09 pm

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Solution 26
Posted February 11, 2013 3:11 pm

Kathryn King
Kathryn King
Reps: 23
I think the crying could be due to his move to a new country and a new school, this can be overwhelming for a child of that age. The good thing about him being so young though is it will be easier for him to adapt to the english language but also keeping his culture alive as well. One way you could do for the child is provide comfort and a positive environment, with this the student will be able to adjust easier and feel more at home. You could also bring in some Japanese culture into the classroom and even incorporate it into a lesson. This will have the child open up more to a new setting and make him feel more welcomed. It would even be interesting for the rest of the class as well!
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Heidi Landon
Heidi Landon
Reps: 58
Providing a comfortable and positive environment is key. Incorporating some Japanese culture into lessons or learning more about the culture could help you to better understand this student. Maybe allowing the student to share/teach his classmates may also be a way to help him open up.
  Posted on: June 4, 2013 1:46 am

Kelly Jackson
Kelly Jackson
Reps: 103
The comfortable safe environment is key. But not being able to communicate with the other students will not allow for a presentation of his own culture but bringing in bits and pieces from his culture info the classroom is a great way to increase comfort.
  Posted on: June 9, 2013 10:39 pm

A Battles
A Battles
Reps: 115
I think bringing in Japanese culture is a good idea. Maybe even decorate a part of the room may help the child feel a little more at home in this scary new place.
  Posted on: October 19, 2013 6:37 pm

Alicia Garcia
Alicia Garcia
Reps: 69
I also agree. I moved a lot as a kid and it can cause you to feel very alone and sad. I imagine this student is coping with these feelings and it is also amplified by being isolated due to a language barrier. Last year I had a student in my class who spoke no English. I asked him (with help from an interpreter) about putting up labels in his language and in English to help him learn the language as was suggested in the post. I imagine this may help your student and may facilitate his language acquisition. I liked the idea of incorporating a project that would allow the Japanese student to bring some of his culture into the classroom. It might also be a good opportunity for other kids to learn and show an appreciation and really welcome the new student to the class.
While I do agree the student deserves ELL services I recognize that these may not appear in a timely manner and that it is important to try and help the student in the mean time.
  Posted on: June 8, 2014 7:12 pm

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Solution 27
Posted February 11, 2013 3:48 pm

Olivia Giauque
Olivia Giauque
Reps: 28
It is important to make the student feel comfortable in the classroom. He has moved all the way from Japan and does know anyone. He does not speak any english and can not explain to you what is wrong. His crying is his way of expressing himself, he is upset. By assigning him a buddy in class, he will have someone to get assistance from on assignments and will have a familiar face to look for until he is comfortable interacting with all students. By providing him specific tasks such as collecting papers, he will have involvement which will allow him to become more comfortable with the classroom and students. After you have tried all of this, parent involvement will be necessary. You will need to schedule an appointment with the parents and the student to address this and develop another plan.
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Jessica Heilman
Jessica Heilman
Reps: 58
This is a good idea assigning him a buddy. That way, he will feel safe at all times, even when he starts to cry. He will know that if he feels uncomfortable, he can always go to his buddy.
  Posted on: June 3, 2013 7:05 am

Nicki Kinner
Nicki Kinner
Reps: 68
This is a great idea that I would not have thought of. Assigning the students a buddy would help the student out greatly. Even if they cannot understand each other, the buddy can explain by showing instead of talking. Assigning the student task in the classroom will also keep his mind off of being away from his friends.
  Posted on: June 4, 2013 12:02 pm

vezaMu
vezaMu
Reps: 85
I love these suggestions. It is an excellent idea to have a buddy for him. And getting him involved could help him have a sense of belonging. I agree that phone calls to parents are not sufficient. A conference needs to be scheduled, and a counselor needs to be consulted.
  Posted on: June 6, 2013 1:38 pm

gyjyjy
gyjyjy
Reps: 71
I thought you had wonderful suggestions for this situation. I like the idea if having the student a buddy/partner to give him someone throughout the day to make him feel a little more at ease. The idea of giving him a task is great for involvement in the classroom and make him feel included.
  Posted on: June 9, 2013 8:48 pm

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Solution 28
Posted June 3, 2013 9:37 pm

yheraZ
yheraZ
Reps: 68
This is a very tough situation for both of you and obviously emotionally distressful for the student. I could not imagine being in his shoes. First, this student needs a way to communicate I advise contacting your schools councilor ASAP to see if you can have a translator brought in for the student at least temporarily or until a better solution becomes available. Most likely you will need this because it seems that the parents are very busy. Second, this student needs to feel welcome, understood, accepted and safe in your classroom. Once you have some communication established you can then proceed forward with this student. The next thing I think you should do is have the class learn about Japanese culture and letting this student if he feels ready to do so share things about himself with his classmates would be a good idea. Hopefully this will help him build some confidence, feel welcome and get the students comfortable and curious to learn more about him. In other classrooms with similar diversity as your classroom I have seen teachers use pictures posted on the walls and labeled in the student’s native language as well as English to help the student learn to communicate independently; sometimes items in the classrooms are even labeled this way. Providing the student with school assignments in both languages is also a recommendation for allowing the student to stay on track and slowly and comfortable assimilate as well. Also, once communication has been established you can encourage you student when he feels as if he misses his friends to write them letters, you can even help this become a fun part of his school curriculum by asking him to share some of the new things he has learned with his friends in his correspondences.
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Solution 29
Posted June 6, 2013 11:39 pm

gyjyjy
gyjyjy
Reps: 71
I have not had to face this in my teaching career and I know that it would be a difficult task. However we must find a way to reach out to the student and help the student transition into the classroom and English language, as much as possible. The child who does not speak the language of the host country may experience varying degrees of culture shock. I feel the boy does not know how to communicate his feelings and is probably intimidated by the others in the classroom, because he does not understand what is going on or what people are saying. I would set up a meeting with his parents and discuss ways in which they can work together to better integrate the child into the classroom and English language. Maybe the parents could come into the classroom one day and share with the class what Japan was like and share pictures. The teacher may also find books and audiotapes from the student’s language and that may interest the student to add to the classroom. The students will get a cultural lesson and maybe it will make the student feel a little more comfortable as well as important. I would also speak with the school administrators and counselor to see what we could offer the student or services that we may be able to provide.
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Sara LeClair
Sara LeClair
Reps: 68


The student is definitely going through a culture shock and transitional period, so the best idea is to get the student help within the school. Also, get his parents involved with getting help as soon as possible. Talking to the counselor would be a great idea as well as having a peer buddy in the classroom. Trial and error will help the teacher truly understand what the child needs and how he will cope with this transition.
  Posted on: June 3, 2014 6:15 pm

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Solution 30
Posted June 28, 2013 10:51 am

tyMaZy
tyMaZy
Reps: 26
Hi Yasar,

I have not been faced with this samesituation; however, I teach low-functioning special education, and have been in many situations in which a child cries uncontrollably for no percievable reason. Now I know the reason for the crying is very differnt from what I have seen in the past, but hopefully my suggestion will help. First, you could ask the child's parents if there is something they can send to school that would be comforting for him, such as a favorite book, toy, picture, etc. Next, to help the child feel a sense of belonging, maybe you could learn just a few simple words in Japanese. The next time he begins crying, you can calmly walk over to him with the comforting item and say a few things to him in Japanese. Just like any other student, you want to build a personal bond with him, so maybe if he sees that you cared enough to take those few extra steps, he will become more comfortable and the crying will subside. Another thing that might help is teaching the whole class a few Japanese words, and having the student help with pronunciation.

I hope this helps!
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Virginia Erbele
Virginia Erbele
Reps: 25
I love the idea of letting the student bring a familiar object of comfort. I also think that learning some familiar words and phrases to speak to the child would be helpful and having him help with pronunciation would let him know that what he thinks is important. I think knowing someone cares enough about him to make him feel comfortable would be great for helping him to stop crying as much.
  Posted on: July 3, 2013 8:41 am

Kayla Mullins
Kayla Mullins
Reps: 89
I think by learning words in his language you are showing him how much you want to help him. I think it is also a great idea to inform the parents on ways that you are working with the student so maybe they can discuss this with him.
-Kayla Mullins
  Posted on: October 16, 2014 2:58 am

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Solution 31
Posted October 10, 2013 6:06 pm

yZaveh
yZaveh
Reps: 109
It does not surprise me that your Japanese 2nd grade student cries often; his life is probably very difficult right now. He has been uprooted from his home and replanted in a what feels to him like an alien world. There is a possibility that he does miss his friends; he might not have been given much notice he was leaving or had an opportunity to say goodbye to his friends.

I think the first solution would be to find a “buddy” for this student in the school. An ideal buddy would be an older Japanese student that could communicate with him and act as a leader, helping him learn the culture of the school and of the US. If there are no other Japanese students at the school, perhaps there is another ELL student that he could pair up with, who understands his struggle.

Another solution would be to give him some kind of outlet to express himself. Obviously he can’t express himself verbally, so allow him to draw or write in his own language. Acknowledge that he may need time away from the rest of the class to “rest” from the bombardment of new ideas and culture.
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BeWuXe
BeWuXe
Reps: 117
I like the idea of allowing him the flexibility to express himself non-verbally. Since language is a barrier, allowing him to complete work using other media may help him to express his emotions other than through tears. Who knows, if he enjoys drawing, a class project such as a collage may be a way to help him feel a part of the group.
  Posted on: October 12, 2013 8:07 pm

Stormye Brantley
Stormye Brantley
Reps: 121
I enjoyed reading your response. Particularly finding him a buddy and giving him some "alone" time. How scary it must be to go to a new school in a new country and not be able to communicate. It must be quite a sensory overload. Having some time to just sit and think -- look at a book, draw a picture, play a computer game, etc. may help the student stop his frequent crying.
  Posted on: October 14, 2013 8:21 pm

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Solution 32
Posted October 12, 2013 8:00 pm

BeWuXe
BeWuXe
Reps: 117
I had a similar situation many years ago in my 7th grade classroom. The boy was from India and had only been in America a week when his parents enrolled him in school. He spoke no English and cried for the first 2 weeks he was at the school. Fortunately, there were a few other students in the school who spoke his language we could call upon when nothing else worked. For this student, it appears he feels alone in his new environment. In order for the student to progress, you must find a way to earn his trust. For example, learning a few phrases in Japanese can show him you respect his culture and are truly making an effort to help him feel more comfortable in your classroom. Also, you could encourage another student in the classroom to befriend and act as a "tour guide" while he is getting familiar with his new school environment. Another idea might be to research the atmosphere of a typical Japanese classroom and try to accommodate him to make him feel more comfortable until he adjusts. It might even be fun to allow all the students to create their own "space" to make him feel a part of the group.
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Amy Fletcher
Amy Fletcher
Reps: 67
I like how you suggested to learn some phrases in Japanese to help the student earn your trust. That is a great idea. Students need to understand that as educators we are here to help them and it is important to make a connection with them.
  Posted on: June 4, 2014 11:20 pm

Megan Teague
Megan Teague
Reps: 55
I like your idea of having the student getting involved. These are the people that will go along with him in his school journey. In most situations the teachers are only get students for a year and then pass them on. Therefore, getting the other students involved is a great idea.
  Posted on: June 6, 2014 7:47 pm

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Solution 33
Posted October 14, 2013 8:16 pm

Stormye Brantley
Stormye Brantley
Reps: 121
The student is probably crying because he misses Japan and being able to clearly and effectively communicate with his friends. I would encourage students to use nonverbal communication with the student and try to befriend him. No matter what language is spoken, kids can still play together on the playground. Perhaps when the boy makes friends he will stop some of the crying. His new friends can also help teach him English. I would also try to allow the student to draw a picture of Japan-- his friends, his house, his family, pet, etc. and see if he is willing to share with the students in the class, or just the teacher. Students can also draw a picture of their house, family, pet, etc. and he can see how maybe they are the same after all.
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Hope Crosby
Hope Crosby
Reps: 122
I agree that the child is most likely missing Japan and his sense of security. I also thought that having kids befriend him on the playground and in class would be a great way to get him to 'warm up' to the new situation. I like your idea of drawing the picture, and this could be something that is easily communicated to the child.

  Posted on: October 18, 2013 6:39 pm

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Solution 34
Posted October 16, 2013 5:04 pm

jaMyDu
jaMyDu
Reps: 119
I believe that this student should be accommodated! He needs help and needs it now. I don't know what your school system has or does when a new student transfers in, but he should have been identified as soon as he stepped in the doors. A student from Japan that does not speak any English should have some type of support to assist him with his English proficiency. I feel that his needs are not being met and that he feels that he does not belong here at this school. I would assume that he feels like no one can help him nor can anyone understand what he is going through. The teacher is the first line of defense in this case. The teacher needs to make every effort possible to make him feel like he is apart of the classroom. First and foremost, the teacher needs to take the time to sit down with the parents and the school system to devise a plan on how they are going to best serve and successfully integrate this student into the mainstream population. They need to find ways that they can incorporate his native language into daily classroom activities so that he does not feel so isolated and insignificant. Another strategy for helping him adjust is having him create one of the film strips similar to Igoa's concept about how he feels about leaving Japan and coming to this country as an immigrant. The teacher needs to select some students from the class and have them help him make this student feel like he is important and apart of this class. He needs to tell these students how they can make him feel more at home and less anxious by doing some research of his own. He needs to find out the student's native language, religion, beliefs, interests, and any other pertinent information that may make it easier for him to help this student transition into the American classroom. Granted, this is not a small feat, but the teacher could type his assignments into the computer and then change the text over to Japanese so that anything that this student needs to read can initially be in his native language (It is hard, we are doing it right now for a Korean student). He can also find audio exerts of poems and literature in his native language so that he feels welcome. He could also find out what school his friends attend back in Japan and he could establish some line of communication with them (i.e. letters, email, Skype, etc.) during the school day. The teacher can also allow this student to share his cultural heritage and who he is with the class. This will take some planning as he is unable to speak English. He may have to type it into a word document in his native language and the teacher may have to convert it to English and read it to the class. I believe that this will help in educating the students on how school and life was for this student in Japan. Then they will have a better understanding of just how different things really are here in America. I must say that this is a lot of work, but it is well worth it. We have a student that just came from Korea and we have had to do these things for her and she has made a wonderful transition into our school. She obviously misses her friends and has her moments, but she has friends here at school and had the ability to progress through the curriculum with proper support and accommodations.
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Megan Teague
Megan Teague
Reps: 55
You came up with some great strategies to help this student. There is not going to be a one step solution and the teacher is going to have to take some extra time, but you solutions could work. I like the idea of translating he work. I think it should be presented in both languages so that he can start getting the hang of English, but he needs to be able t understand something and the translation would help. I also like the idea of sitting down with the parent; I too would have suggested that. The school and teacher need to know as much as they can about the student and his background. Igoa focused on that safe environment and that is the same focus that needs to happen in this situation.
  Posted on: June 6, 2014 7:43 pm

Chelsea Abbott
Chelsea Abbott
Reps: 112
I agree that catering to the student would be a great idea in helping him become accommodated with his new school and learning environment. The teacher will need to look into his culture and possibly give a lesson about Japan and his language. Making the student feel welcome in the class will be hard, but will be a great step in helping the student. Also, I would recommend that the teacher make a home visit to meet the parents and see the student in his own environment. The teacher may learn more about the student and find out his interests. (They may be able to be integrated into the classroom)
  Posted on: October 5, 2015 11:05 pm

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Solution 35
Posted October 18, 2013 6:36 pm

Hope Crosby
Hope Crosby
Reps: 122
Student Won’t Stop Crying
I think the child is crying because he feels alone and out of place. The child does not speak English and is therefore completely and utterly lost; not knowing what in the world is going on. To stop the crying I would try putting some of my ‘special helpers’ next to the student and ask them to try and engage him in the classroom activities, sit next to him at lunch, and attempt to play with him at recess. Perhaps if he can see that there are some friendly students in the class with him he will not feel so out of place and will start to adjust better.
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Rachel Walker
Rachel Walker
Reps: 60
I think that asking some of your students to sit next to him and try to befriend him is a really good idea! I think back to some of my readings for my cultural issues class and one author (Igoa, 1995) mentions that when she talked to some of her students that they said when they had friends in school that it made it easier and more enjoyable. These students will hopefully start to make the child more comfortable in his new surroundings.
  Posted on: June 3, 2014 3:59 am

Sara LeClair
Sara LeClair
Reps: 68
I think a peer buddy would be a great idea to get the student adjusted to the changes at the new school. That way, the student has someone to rely on in the classroom and can help him through the day. Also- an adult advisor would not be a bad idea either. Since the teacher is busy teaching her students, maybe another adult in the building could be his accountability partner and come check on him every so often. THis would make him feel more comfortable and eventually stop crying.
  Posted on: June 3, 2014 6:12 pm

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Solution 36
Posted December 7, 2012 6:11 pm

Sarah Hogan Johnson
Sarah Hogan Johnson
Reps: 162
It may be beneficial to set up a video chat with some of his friends from Japan. If you could arrange this, it would give the other students in your class an opportunity to learn about his culture as well. Maybe you could arrange a way to have a teacher at his old school film the students saying hello and they miss him too. They could film a little tour of the school. Then, the new student could do the same thing at your school and send it back to his friends. This way, the new student gets to communicate with his old friends as well as making new ones in the process of making the video to send back.
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Johnnie Skelton
Johnnie Skelton
Reps: 104
This might be difficult to facilitate, but I bet that this student would love getting to show his new classmates his old school. Most importantly, I think that this would make him feel that he had not completely lost his old friends.
  Posted on: June 4, 2013 3:51 pm

yVyLyG
yVyLyG
Reps: 69
While this idea would involve a huge effort on the teacher's part, including contacting the parents and other school as well as finding translators to proceed with, I think it is a great idea! Even going a step further and creating a (obviously very basic) pen-pal situation with the students in both classes, which would help students learn translations and help the crying student feel as though he is part of the group. Great idea.
  Posted on: June 9, 2013 10:59 pm

April Rozier
April Rozier
Reps: 110
Wow I think this is a wonderful idea! Technology has advanced so much and utilizing it to deal with this problem would be great. The student will know that he can still remain in contact with his old friends even though he is in a new environment. It may help resolve the crying issue.
  Posted on: October 16, 2014 12:21 am

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Solution 37
Posted December 4, 2012 11:25 am

Savanna Hayman
Savanna Hayman
Reps: 104
This is a really tricky situation because it involves more than just the student's academic struggles but also their personal ones. I think that the parents being unavailable is definitely a roadblock, but shouldn't stop you from reaching out to the student one-on-one. Communicating with him could be difficult, but perhaps bringing him to your computer after school and showing him a website such as http://imtranslator.net/translate-and-speak/japanese/ would help. Websites like this will let you type what you want to say, then play it aloud in Japanese, and so forth. I can imagine how hard it would be to be in his situation and talking to him alone seems like the only way you are really going to get through to him. I would ask him if he was planning on learning English, or if there was anything I could do to help him get where he needed to be both socially and academically.
+
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yheraZ
yheraZ
Reps: 68
I think that the parent’s lack of involvement is defiantly a hindrance as well but I agree with you that it shouldn't completely stop you. I do think that using the website you suggested would be a very effective tool, not only does it allow the student to use technology that he is probably familiar with but allows him to use it in a fun and constructive way. I do suggest also that this student may need a more substantial way of communicating at least temporarily. But I really like your idea it is very original and I think would be very helpful.
  Posted on: June 3, 2013 9:52 pm

udydyV
udydyV
Reps: 108
Just put yourself in the child's shoes. What would you want? Me personally, I would want to know that I am not alone. I would want someone to talk to. Someone to show me around. I would want some friends. We were all strangers to a class at one point in time. Perhaps it was the first day of school. Just remember back to that time and how you felt and use that feeling to guide your decision making for this student.
  Posted on: October 17, 2013 7:22 am

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Solution 38
Posted December 4, 2012 9:01 pm

Jessica Oglesby
Jessica Oglesby
Reps: 110
I am sure this is an overwhelming situation for your student to be in. I can't imagine going to another country, attending a new school, and not being able to communicate with others around me. I think you should begin by making your new student fill more at home. Find out some things that he likes, give him opportunities to share his culture and background. Include him as much as possible in activities and class involvement (line leader, door holder, etc. Show him pictures, break down concepts for him, and be a warm, kind hearted role model. Also help him make friends and collaborate with other peers by working together in groups or participating in games. Help him create a new classroom home and friends where he feels loved and important.
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Kristen Eason
Kristen Eason
Reps: 57
The teacher needs to insure the student that the classroom in a positive learning environment and that everyone there works together as a family. The teacher also need think about setting the student up with a peer that can help him around the school, with his assignments, and help make other new friends. The teacher also needs to dig deep and find out what the student enjoys doing. It might be reading, drawing, playing a musical instrument, or playing a sport. If the student has something positive to look forward to each day at school, this can reduce this ability to continually cry.
  Posted on: June 2, 2014 3:47 pm

LeeAnna Elder
LeeAnna Elder
Reps: 75
I like the idea of having a peer buddy. This of course would not solve the root cause of why this young man is crying at school. However, a buddy will like you stated, give this student something positive to look forward to at school each day.
  Posted on: June 13, 2014 5:20 pm

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Solution 39
Posted December 7, 2012 10:41 pm

Anna Washinger
Anna Washinger
Reps: 121
This seems like such a tough situation for both you and your student. I could not imagine being moved from my home to a different country and on top of that, not knowing the language of the new country that I had moved to. I believe a possible solution may be to have a week where the class learns about different countries or cultures. On one of those days, you could talk about Japan and maybe even talk to the parents of the upset student to find out some of his favorite things about his home that you can incorporate into the lesson. In this situation, I feel that it is most important to accommodate the student and his needs. Make him feel important and that he is accepted and welcomed into this new environment. He may even feel like he has the opportunity to make new friends when he sees students embracing his culture. I believe another good idea would to be forming support group for other young students who have moved from a different country. You could get together with other teachers who may have the student in his/her class in the upcoming years and discuss ways to continue to accommodate the student to help him adapt.
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BeWuXe
BeWuXe
Reps: 117
The idea of the students sharing their cultures with their classmates would definitely be a way to feel a part of the group. This young boy is feeling alone without his friends. Allowing the students to share what is important to them with the group will certainly build relationships. By building these relationships he will be able to begin new friendships. Although there may be other underlying reasons for his crying, an activity like this will certainly occupy his time and help to focus his emotions on something productive.
  Posted on: October 12, 2013 8:45 pm

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Solution 40
Posted June 4, 2013 3:44 pm

Brittany Smith
Brittany Smith
Reps: 69
I think it is important to get on his level. Since he does not speak English, find a way to connect with him through something like art or music. He is probably crying for more than his friends. He is in an entirely new culture, and he does not understand how and where he fits in this new society. Not only is language a barrier that hinders him from making progression, but he is also being hindered by a completely new educational setup. He most likely feels that he is being left behind and pressured because he does not have the capabilities to catch up or even understand what exactly is going on. This student needs one on one work on a daily basis. As a teacher, you need to study up on his culture and language and try to reach out to him in ways that are familiar to him. It will require a lot of patience, but through this slow process, he will gradually begin learning and making connections with you and eventually with the rest of his classmates.
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Love Joy
Love Joy
Reps: 78
I agree that he is probably crying for his friends. If so, he must understand that learning the language is important but he has to learn to communicate in his new home. He can write his friends once he gets home or completes and assignment. Using the letter writing as a positive behavior strategy will help to alleviate the crying. Once he understands that he may not master the assignments until he learns the language better but he must try them and succeeding comes only through trial and error. Being the teacher, you have to find ways to help the student to reach out and want to learn. Finding ways to incorporate learning for him will make him understand that he is not the only one struggling. As a teacher you are also and you are attempting to complete the struggle and so must he.
  Posted on: June 9, 2013 8:45 pm

Jessica Briley
Jessica Briley
Reps: 109
I agree that this child is definitely crying for more than just missing his friends. He is completely out of his comfort zone and has no one to communicate this with. I like the idea of the teacher researching about the boy's culture and bringing this into the classroom. This will be very difficult, and may require some extra creativity but I think it could be done.
  Posted on: October 17, 2013 1:51 pm

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Solution 41
Posted June 6, 2013 1:46 pm

vezaMu
vezaMu
Reps: 85
This post has a lot of great solutions. Moving to another country is difficult, and not knowing the language at all will add to the culture shock. The boy must feel very isolated and tired from trying to understand what is going on and not being able to communicate with others. As others have suggested, bringing some Japanese into the classroom would be helpful to work toward alleviating the culture shock and isolation. I would also search further than the school walls for someone who can speak with him in Japanese. I think assigning a buddy is a great idea as well. That way he will begin to develop friendships and bonds with other students, lessening the sense of loneliness. The counselor should be contacted right away to set up a conference with the parents. If they have been unable to meet thus far, there has to be a way of communicating with them so that you can work as a group to find a solution. Finally, the teacher should take some time to research Japanese culture, language, and customs to better understand the child’s background and help him adjust to his new setting.
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L. Carrell
L. Carrell
Reps: 63
Contacting the counselor is a great solution. Maybe when the student starts to cry he can go visit the counselor so he does not distract the other students. The counselor would have ways to help soothe the student. Yet if the crying continues, some of the other solutions would have to take place because he would start to miss too much class time.
  Posted on: June 9, 2013 8:58 pm

maTepe
maTepe
Reps: 22
I agree that the counselor should be contacted. She would have time to spend with him and find other resources for the teacher. I also agree that the teacher should research the student's culture in order to understand him better.
  Posted on: June 28, 2013 11:32 am

Emily West
Emily West
Reps: 102
I had not even thought about contacting the counselor. I think this a great idea and would really be beneficial to this student.
  Posted on: October 1, 2013 8:51 pm

Nick Thrower
Nick Thrower
Reps: 67
I like that you mentioned finding a buddy. I hadn't thought of that. Even if they don't communicate well, this will send a message to the student that he is welcome.
  Posted on: June 13, 2014 3:11 pm

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Solution 42
Posted June 8, 2013 5:28 pm

VyQaqu
VyQaqu
Reps: 71
I believe that this is an extremely hard situation. I think that the student is crying everyday because the student feels out of place. The student does not know anyone or the language. He is a little person in a new world huge world that he does not understand. Every time that he has to come to school, it is another reminder of what he left behind and his loneliness. The teacher needs to make sure that that he or she gives the student a lot of attention without taking away from the rest of the class. The teacher needs to make sure that they try their best to create activities or lessons that are intergraded with the Japanese culture. The teacher also needs to seek out the help of the school's guidance counselor so that they can discuss with the parents interventions that can be put in place to help the student become more comfortable in the classroom.
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Solution 43
Posted June 28, 2013 11:29 am

maTepe
maTepe
Reps: 22
This is so sad. This student should be accommodated and the school system should find someone who could communicate with him. I also think that it is unfair for this student to be placed in a regular classroom all day. There should be some time that he could go to smaller setting and maybe later as he becomes comfortable let him go back to the classroom. I can only imagine how scared he must feel not knowing what anyone is saying. I'm sure he is crying because he is terrified and in an unfamiliar setting. I think that he needs to feel safe and that his culture needs to be exposed in the classroom for him to feel welcome.
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Kris Peebles
Kris Peebles
Reps: 58
I also agree that it is sad that this student does not know how to communicate with others. How challenging it must be to not know what anyone is saying. I would cry too if I couldn't talk to any of my friends at school. That was a nice idea to set aside some time for the child to be in a smaller setting as opposed to being in a massive class all day. I enjoyed reading your post.
  Posted on: June 30, 2013 10:56 pm

A Battles
A Battles
Reps: 115
I also like the idea of giving him time in a smaller group of students. This could help make friendships with students and as he feels more apart of the school the small group could be weened out.
  Posted on: October 19, 2013 6:40 pm

TuVuze
TuVuze
Reps: 99
As a part of the student’s academic program, he should be allowed to attend ESOL classes within the school on a daily basis. To help the student become more adjusted to the school environment, I think this would help greatly. Even though there are not any individuals at the school that speak Japanese, there are most likely students that attend the school whose second language is English. Seeing other students in the ESOL classes may allow the student to become aware that he is not the only person attempting to learn a new language. This may help him to feel hopeful that he can learn English as well.
  Posted on: October 19, 2013 11:57 pm

aBugeS
aBugeS
Reps: 77
I agree. I think that this child should be accommodated and placed in small groups. This will help him to be more comfortable. I can imagine my own self being scared at his age if I was in his shoes. He is still very young and he needs comfort and familiarity.
  Posted on: June 9, 2014 3:27 pm

Myzusy
Myzusy
Reps: 113
I agree, he should get to spend time in a smaller environment where he is less intimidated. ESOL class is the perfect way to provide that environment along with other children who are also ELL's. They can set an example so that the new student won't feel isolated as the only non-English speaker in the school. I would also try to ask the school guidance counselor to include the student in small group counseling. The counselor may be able to help him understand his feelings of fear and provide strategies to help him with alternative to crying to alleviate those fears.
  Posted on: October 16, 2014 4:20 pm

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Solution 44
Posted October 17, 2013 8:48 pm

Tracy C
Tracy C
Reps: 104
The student cannot stop crying because there is nothing in the classroom that he can identify with that is culturally relevant to him. The student does not feel safe, secured, and accepted in his new environment. Here is what the teacher should do. First, if at all possible, the teacher should ask the student's parents for information about friends in Japan; I would attempt to ask the parents to provide me with his former school contact data so that I can invite the child's former teacher and classmates to Skype online with our class for couple of minutes a day to share a learning task. If there's a language barrier, then I would allow only the student to engage in the Skype session.

Another solution may include simply interviewing the student's parents to get information about his cultural background. I would use this information to include some of his culture in the classroom to make him feel more accepted and apart of the classroom.
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yXeBeX
yXeBeX
Reps: 114
I think Skype is a fantastic idea. In this day and age where technology allows us to connect with anyone at anytime, this resource should be used to make this new student feel more comfortable and less alone. I also think that the parents need to be made aware of the seriousness of the child's excessive crying and assist the school with figuring out why the child is doing it.
  Posted on: October 12, 2014 8:35 pm

GyJeWy
GyJeWy
Reps: 105
I agree, I love the idea of skype I also thought maybe if he could communicate with his friends from Japan it may make the transition easier. There definitely needs to be more in the class that he can identify with as well.
  Posted on: October 19, 2014 2:59 pm

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Solution 45
Posted October 20, 2013 9:34 pm

upyNuX
upyNuX
Reps: 100
I imagine if I had been displaced to another country where I didn't speak any of the language, at that age, I would have cried every day also. I think that is one of many natural responses.

I would start by talking to the counselor and ESOL coordinator for you school. Get their input and find out what they can do to help this student in addition to the work you will do with him.

Then I would talk with his parents to see if there is something that would be comforting to him that he could bring to school with him. Maybe a picture of his friends or his family or something one of his friends gave him in Japan.

Another idea that I think might help is to take some time to study about Japan as a class. Learn about their culture and customs. It would even be nice to find a school in Japan you could Skype with as a class or become pen pals with. If you could arrange it with his old school that would be even better!
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Jill Elton
Jill Elton
Reps: 108
I think that using Skype is a great idea! I would also look into, if this teacher had an iPad, downloading various apps that translate from Japanese to English, and vice versa, along with Japanese games, etc. These, I believe, would help all involved feel more connected and would provide a tool to help in the communication process. It's truly AMAZING what technology can do these days!
  Posted on: October 12, 2015 1:48 am

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Solution 46
Posted June 2, 2014 5:19 am

Justin Redmond
Justin Redmond
Reps: 51
This is a difficult situation for a child. I have Hispanics in my classroom who do not speak English and become very frustrated. However, in my case, I speak Spanish, so it is a little easier for the children. I think the first thing that should happen is to bring in someone that speaks Japanese. The child has no idea what is going and has no one to talk to. With someone that speaks Japanese in the classroom, this will ease some of the frustration for the child. Also, it might be helpful to translate worksheets, notes, and other assignments into Japanese. We have a program at my school that will translate assignments into Spanish, and I am pretty sure it also translates into Japanese. I remember an assignment that I did in second grade where we had to research a country and kind of present it to the class. I would allow him to do an assignment similar to this where he could share something about his home, even if it does not require him to speak in front of the class. This would be an assignment that would be comfortable for him. Also, you could meet with the school counselor and research Japanese culture. Once you have obtained information about Japanese culture, you could explain some of it to a couple students. Then, you could make these students his partners. Although they would be unable to communicate, just having someone there to help him with everyday tasks could be helpful for him. I would also schedule an appointment with his parents. A plan needs to be made with feedback from the parents.
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Qureby
Qureby
Reps: 102
There is so much technology available to teachers and students today and I definitely think that should be utilized in this situation. What a great idea to find a program that can translate worksheets for the student. One of my coworkers came from a district with a large Korean population and she would use a similar program to translate worksheets and notes for her Korean students.
  Posted on: October 19, 2014 1:43 pm

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Solution 47
Posted June 2, 2014 9:26 pm

Laura Toft
Laura Toft
Reps: 71
When I taught Pre-K I had several students that cried every morning when they came to class. I found that having pictures around the room of students with their families helped because students could look at the pictures when they were sad. If the child is having a hard tie transitioning you could also make a picture schedule so that the child can follow along as he adjusts to the new school routine. Since the child can't speak English and is in a new space that would be very frustrating and scary for anyone! It's important to support the child through pictures and comforting to help as he adjusts to his new lifestyle.
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Michael Herndon
Michael Herndon
Reps: 68
I like the idea of using pictures. Though the student may not speak the same language, pictures may be easier to understand. The student may have a better idea of what is going on and may be less scared or alleviate whatever issue was causing the crying.
  Posted on: June 3, 2014 9:29 pm

Kim Lucas
Kim Lucas
Reps: 107
Having pictures of the student's family and friends around the classroom is a very comforting idea. I wonder if you would have a hard time communicating this to the parents. This type of activity and thoughtfulness would be very appreciated by anyone who was going through a change in everything they knew to be familiar!
  Posted on: October 20, 2014 2:59 am

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Solution 48
Posted June 3, 2014 11:25 pm

Elizabeth Comella
Elizabeth Comella
Reps: 51
The student that has moved from Japan to the US might not understand why he had to leave his homeland to move to a different culture. In this case the student has been “surrounded by an unfamiliar environment” (Igoa, 1995, p. 34). As the teacher the first thing I would do is to observe the student in the classroom in order to find his area of comfort. When the students are able to pick an area of the room to work where does the student from Japan prefer work? Does the student work in a group or alone? What is the location that the student prefers to sit to complete their work? Is it on the carpet? In a desk? In a chair?

I would research the culture of Japan so see how students are taught in school. Do student from Japan sit in desk, chairs, or the floor? The issue could be the culture of the classroom is different and the student from Japan is unable to adapt to the new culture. I would try and include a “space for the student’s precious objects” (Igoa, 1995, p. 34) in the classroom in order to establish a feeling of home in the classroom. The student might feel more at ease with the small changes made to the learning environment and personal items in the room in order ease the transition of school in Japan and school in the United States.

Elizabeth Comella

Igoa, C. (1995). The Inner World of the Immigrant Child. Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.

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Solution 49
Posted June 4, 2014 12:08 am

Krissy Chance-Bailey
Krissy Chance-Bailey
Reps: 65
I think the student is overwhelmed and instead of it coming out in anger he cries. I say this because I remember times in a class I tried so hard to understand the formula or method in an algebraic expression I would literally begin to sob. I think the school should accommodate his need and find a interpreter as with a deaf student having someone interpret for them.

As the teacher with not much flexibility I would begin to school myself on Japanese culture and language. Find a connection and foster the students need to communicate. Give him cassettes to listen to stories in his native tongue and stories of humans conquering animals. This student demonstrates no hope and this is where as the teacher you can introduce a hopeful scenario in the form a picture, story or film strip.
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aheduX
aheduX
Reps: 112
I agree with you. I think that the student does feel overwhelmed with the "new" all around him and he probably does miss his friends and "things he knows". I would also find the connection that works with the student. If there was not a translator available, I would let the student listen to stories in his language to show that I am trying to help him and make him feel comfortable as you stated. Drawings would be a great way of communication as well. He could do this in response to stories or feelings.



  Posted on: October 20, 2014 2:05 am

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Solution 50
Posted June 4, 2014 8:27 pm

LaChristen Boyd
LaChristen Boyd
Reps: 68
I think the first think I would do is try to relate to what he's feeling. I would imagine moving to Japan with my parents as a child. I would think about not knowing or anything or anyone. It would be devastating and mind- blowing. I think that a translator should be bought in or an technology source that translates so that at least then you could understand each other. I would make sure he spoke to the school counselor if possible as well. I would also try to be sensitive to him and try to teach, other than talking if he can't understand my language, in ways other than straight talking and lecturing. Maybe songs in different languages, pictures, videos. Differentiation would be mandatory. I would also explain to the students what is going on so that they aren't so distracted.
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Solution 51
Posted June 4, 2014 9:03 pm

Nick Thrower
Nick Thrower
Reps: 67
This seems to be a case for the ESOL coordinator. The student cannot communicate with you or others as to why he is upset. Somehow you can communicate to him that when he does begin to feel sad, to move to a specific spot in the room.
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Solution 52
Posted June 5, 2014 2:42 am

Susan Esra
Susan Esra
Reps: 68
I have been the inclusion teacher for a three-year-old classroom which contained students with special needs, typical children, and migrant children who speak no English. Many times, the new migrant students will cry for the first week or so in the classroom. I have found that saying random words in Spanish (from my extremely limited vocabulary) has helped the student, as well as taking walks in the school. I think that the busy classroom setting overwhelmed the children, and the quieter environment of the hallway was calming. I am sure that the constant noise in a language you do not understand at all would be totally frustrating. Maybe during noisier times of the day when students are all talking at once, your student could work on something in a different part of the classroom away from the class. Also, I use a language master to work on vocabulary and academic concepts with my students- they run cards through a machine, and I have prerecorded the word I want them to hear as the card goes through, paired with a picture or word. You could use a language master with headphones for your student to work independently on new words at his own pace. You could also assign your student a sensitive, helpful peer who can model what is going on the classroom when he doesn't understand. It may take him some time to overcome his anxiety and sadness, but with time and a caring teacher and classmates, he will become acclimated.
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Hannah Nabors
Hannah Nabors
Reps: 68
Susan,
I smiled reading about your limited use of Spanish. I agree that the student may be comforted by hearing your speak Japanese, no matter how limited or incorrectly pronounced. I believe he will recognize your efforts as a comfort offering. I also LOVE you idea of giving the student a quiet, safe space to go to when the new environment becomes too much. I have seen children "walking the hallway" or working in the hallway, many times in order to be removed from an overwhelming, overstimulating environment. Great strategy idea!
  Posted on: June 5, 2014 7:57 pm

wendy burns
wendy burns
Reps: 80
I agree the classroom climate is so important when working with ELL students. All students need a secure learning environment to work it, and this is especially true of studetns who are immigrants. I understand how it feels to be in a country and not be able to speak or understand the language. It is difficult to communicate. People who are caring are so helpful in situations where you don't understand the language being spoken. Teachers play such an important role when they work with immigrant students and help them learn language and become part of the classroom community.
  Posted on: June 7, 2014 2:06 pm

vasere
vasere
Reps: 70
I think walking through the school is a great idea. Of course, ask if he wants to and if he wants to bring someone with him. But doing this may help him become familiar with the school and therefore more comfortable. Also, showing that you care enough to speak his language is probably incredibly helpful! I also think that the quiet place in the room is a great idea. This way, he may can have a peaceful and calming place which he can go to without completely removing himself from the classroom.
  Posted on: June 3, 2015 2:51 am

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Solution 53
Posted June 5, 2014 4:40 am

Nick Hanna
Nick Hanna
Reps: 71
I believe that your student does miss his friends, but that is not all that he misses. I am sure he misses his old country (Japan), old school, etc. To be completely uprooted and placed in an environment that you have zero language similarities with your peers is a very scary situation. It shoulds like the student is in the "culture shock" stage of an immigrant child adapting to a new school. By connecting the student with some of your most friendly and patient students, will help both parties involved. The Japanese student will start to create a meaningful relationship with a peer that will help him feel more comfortable in school and the other student will learn to be more accepting of other students/cultures. I had a student a few years back that moved to Georgia from India and could not communicate with anyone else at the school. While she was in my class, I had another student that was relatively new to the country (orginally from Columbia), work with her and help her with most assignments in class. The students became very close and figured out a way to communicate with each other using basic sign language and hand signals. By having friends or peers that you relate with at school makes coming to school way more enjoyable and a better environment to succeed in.
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James Moran
James Moran
Reps: 62
Communication is so important even if it is simply hand signals. Human beings need to communicate with each other and that is why many immigrants struggle and go through a silent period. They are struggling to communicate in a world that doesn't understand them. I think making connections as soon as possible is important for the success of immigrant students.
  Posted on: June 15, 2014 3:46 pm

aHeRaL
aHeRaL
Reps: 112
I agree that there was probably a whole lot going on in the student's life that contributed to his crying, not just missing his friends. Also, the application to the culture shock stage of immigration is a good notion to consider. The student is in a new place that is completely different from anything he has experienced. As you pointed out in the story about your student, helping the boy feel comfortable and welcomed via relationships and friendships will go a long way in helping him to move beyond the culture shock stage.
  Posted on: October 14, 2014 7:17 pm

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Solution 54
Posted June 5, 2014 3:14 pm

Ashley Mays
Ashley Mays
Reps: 64
I can't imagine how overwhelmed this student must feel to be in a completely new place and he does not know any of the language and/or has no friends here yet. I can certainly understand why he is crying and to be honest I would probably cry to. I think the first thing that I would do is have a conference with his parents to learn more about the child. I would want to know what his were his likes, dislikes, interests, hobbies, etc. so that I could try to connect with the child and make the environment easier to transition into. Next, I would try to label items and areas in the classroom in Japanese and English so that he can better understand the classroom setting. Once I knew some of his interests, I would write the student a letter using google translate in hopes that he would feel that I cared about him and wanted him to be comfortable in the classroom. I also would seek help from the counselor to try and get support for this student as soon as possible to ease his transition as well. I think it is also a good idea to explain to the other students his situation in hopes that they would understand why he is crying so much in class.
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James Moran
James Moran
Reps: 62
I like your idea of making the classroom as bilingual as possible this would be more important for the other students than the immigrant student because it would help those students learn words that they can use to create a communication bridge to this student.
  Posted on: June 15, 2014 3:49 pm

aQazuV
aQazuV
Reps: 105
I think it is a great idea to make as many connections with the student as possible so that they feel "at home" in your classroom. I love the idea of labeling things in the room with both languages. The process of helping this student assimilate into the American culture will be very difficult and time consuming however, it will be so rewarding to know that you helped this student transition smoothly.
  Posted on: October 15, 2014 10:24 pm

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Solution 55
Posted June 5, 2014 4:35 pm

Cardia Foster
Cardia Foster
Reps: 73
I think the student may be experiencing culture shock. Being that he is of a young age, it's harder for him to adjust. The author Igoa used film strips, peer bonding, the buddy system and so much more. I would also incorporate as many things from his culture as I can in the classroom. This will make him feel more welcomed.
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Solution 56
Posted June 15, 2014 3:43 pm

James Moran
James Moran
Reps: 62
I think that this is a great opportunity for students to learn how to reach out to people who are different. I would try and teach my students some phrases in Japanese. Certainly it would be difficult to communicate with this student but the teacher and the other students might learn some phrases in Japanese that might comfort the crying student. Some phrases that the students might learn could be "We are your friends" and "We like you." Students could also learn how to say "how do you say?" in Japanese. In this way, they could also begin a dialogue with this new student. This student is sad because he misses his old country and friend. He won't feel better until he begins to make new friends. Therefore, it is important that he begin to communicate with other students in his class.
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ePeHyM
ePeHyM
Reps: 105
I agree with your post 100%. Let the students comfort him. His needs someone who will open up to him and help ease him through the process of immigration. He needs someone who cares. Allowing the student to learn phrase in Japanese will show him that he will not be judged or made fun of and that they are happy that he is in the class. It is also a great opportunity for the students to learn compassion.
  Posted on: October 12, 2014 9:55 pm

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Solution 57
Posted October 8, 2014 2:53 pm

aHeRaL
aHeRaL
Reps: 112
I can only assume your student is crying because of the emotional distress he is feeling from being uprooted from the familiar comforts of Japan and being brought to the United States. It would seem that focusing on this one student to help him adjust is of utmost importance, otherwise educational time for himself and the the class will be lost. I would check with the resources at the school. Does your school have a pull out class for ELL students? If so, arrange time for him to go to this class or room on a regular basis. If he does not speak English, can you get books and materials that are in Japanese and will help him make the transition to English? Next, you have to establish a line of communication. With the available technology in our world, I would think you could find a translator that could help with simple questions and key phrases. Using that, figure out what will help the student become comfortable in the class. Does he want to sit up front of the room or in the back, etc? Last, I would work with a student that I trust and know to be trustworthy to be a "buddy" for the new student. His class "buddy" would help the student navigate school, classes, etc. This should provide a consistent and familiar face that will hopefully make his transition a bit more comfortable and smooth.
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Solution 58
Posted October 9, 2014 8:30 pm

PyveDu
PyveDu
Reps: 101


With technology now it is so cool to be able to have pen pals and FaceTime over seas. I believe this would be very exciting to get a hold of the child's old school and communicate your ideas with the teacher about writing letters and seeing them over video. It would engage the new child and he could make a connection by allowing the students at this school to see what the same age children are learning in Japan (similarities/ differences). This also shows the child how much you care about his feelings.
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Whitney Johnson
Whitney Johnson
Reps: 97
Pen Pals is a great idea--one that I would have never brainstormed! not only is this a good connection for the student, but it could also help him work on his writing skills. This is an excellent idea.
  Posted on: October 20, 2014 1:13 am

Laura Doolittle
Laura Doolittle
Reps: 109


I also thought that pen pals would be a great idea. I didn't even think about doing it through FaceTime. This is a awesome idea! It is great for the new student but it is also showing the class about the Japanese culture. They can see how things are similar and different.
  Posted on: October 4, 2015 8:27 pm

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Solution 59
Posted October 12, 2014 8:25 pm

yXeBeX
yXeBeX
Reps: 114
First thing that needs to be done is to find someone that can come to the school who can speak his language. I think it is unacceptable for a child to be in a school where nobody can understand him. What if he has a serious problem and he needs to tell someone immediately? What if he become sick? He will need to have the ability to tell someone what he is feeling. Secondly, the child is obviously going through some very serious issues with regard to his move. I am sure he is feeling isolated and alone and the fact that he cannot communicate with anybody makes matters even worse. I would put him at a desk with crayons and paper and see he will draw a picture. If so, this picture might tell a story of what is going on inside of his head which might give the teacher some ideas of how to help him.
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ReMuXy
ReMuXy
Reps: 78
I also agree that is important to have someone that can come in that can translate. I don’t believe it is fair that he cannot speak up for himself. I would be feeling upset to if I was in the child’s situation, however, I think he is young enough to make a change. I like the idea about him drawing a picture. I would ensure that I would learn about his culture that I could help engage him.
  Posted on: June 3, 2015 12:09 pm

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Solution 60
Posted October 15, 2014 11:18 pm

April Rozier
April Rozier
Reps: 110
Just as you have went through an adaptation process, the new student will also. You should try to put yourself in the student's shoes and realize how incredibly scary it must be to be in such a different environment. You also need to speak with administrators about finding someone in the community/school that can work with him on learning English and help interpret what he is saying. Perhaps the person could put a system in place that would allow him to communicate through pictures until he learns English. The student will then be able to interact with other students and not feel so lonely without his friends.
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Solution 61
Posted October 19, 2014 7:12 pm

Ashley Smith
Ashley Smith
Reps: 107
The student is expressing feelings of sadness, heartache, and unhappiness. The uprooting experience that he has gone through is more intense than he can communicate with the people that surround him. The shock from moving away from one country to a different place with a new group of cultural beings is overwhelming. I would suggest finding an outlet where the student can express his feelings in a safe environment. Christina Ogoa (1995) utilized filmstrips and other artwork techniques to help her immigrant children share their feelings with others. I would consult with the counselor to brainstorm other strategies that could be implemented in the school setting to help the student become confident in dealing with the emotional state that he is experiencing at this time.
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Solution 62
Posted June 3, 2015 12:01 pm

ReMuXy
ReMuXy
Reps: 78
I think you have to understand his circumstances and that he is only a second grader. Moreover, you may try to pair him up with someone in the classroom that would be good with him as a peer and maybe they would eventually become friends. I would also make a referral to the counselor and set up a conference with the parent so they can translate. I would also come up with someone he can check in with daily. Furthermore, I would also come up with activities that would interest him that deal with Japan. This is a tough situation because the student cannot speak to explain what is going on so it is important to get a translator in (parents) as soon as possible to help him.
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yzaSeR
yzaSeR
Reps: 68
I think setting him up with a peer would be a great idea. It would allow him to be able to create relationships in the classroom that may make him feel more at home. This is a really great idea.
  Posted on: June 3, 2015 1:10 pm

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Solution 63
Posted June 3, 2015 1:06 pm

yzaSeR
yzaSeR
Reps: 68
Moving to a new school is very hard. Moving to a new school where no one knows your language is even harder. The student probably does feel very lonely and he also probably misses his friends and family. I would set up time during the day to allow students to have a free time where they could play with the student to make him feel welcome. I would include games or activities that could be easy to pick up on without speech so that he can become more comfortable. Meanwhile I would try to do what others have suggested and integrate some Japanese words around the classroom to not only make my student feel comfortable, but also to teach my other students words in a new language.
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Solution 64
Posted October 12, 2015 11:25 pm

ehyNyn
ehyNyn
Reps: 109
This seems like a difficult situation, but you have to remain patient with the student. As you might expect, this is a big change for him and he is trying to adjust. The best thing that you can do is find some piece of his culture to include in your teaching or in your classroom. This will show him that he belongs and also that you care about him. Another strategy you might try is learning a simple phrase in Japanese and trying to speak to him with it. By doing this, you will show him that you are interested in his culture and want to learn information from him just as he does you. By showing him that he belongs and you care about him, I'll bet he becomes more comfortable and stops crying.
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Solution 65
Posted October 13, 2015 4:24 pm

Kateline Vaughn
Kateline Vaughn
Reps: 106
Patience is a huge factor in this situation. You hate to see a child cry every single day, but you cannot push anything on him. I would recommend trying one or maybe even two things at a time. The child doesn't need to be overwhelmed more than he already is. I think it's important to assign the child a "buddy". Although his buddy might not be able to speak Japanese, he can show him where things are at school or how they do certain things. The child probably wouldn't feel as uncomfortable if he had a friend. I also think it's important to integrate Japanese culture into the classroom. This way he can feel more comfortable talking about things he knows, and this gives his classmates an opportunity to learn a little about him.
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Qybuse
Qybuse
Reps: 118
I think you have some great suggestions. I think helping the student to feel that he belongs in the classroom would help to take his mind off of the culture shock he is going through. Although he might not be able to communicate directly with a "buddy," he can easily see what the buddy is doing and imitate him. I think having a buddy helps students to start fitting in and gives them someone to stick with and hopefully start forming friendships with.
  Posted on: October 19, 2015 12:28 am

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Solution 66
Posted October 16, 2015 1:52 am

Amanda Whittaker
Amanda Whittaker
Reps: 114
I would try and find an online translating program to see if you can learn some Japanese and try to communicate with the little boy. By showing the initiative that you want to learn his language he may stop some of the crying. Also, see if any of the other kids will befriend him and try and help him out. Show him some pictures of emotions and activities and see if he relates to any of them. To stop the other students from being distracted, I would talk to my students and let them know that he is missing his friends and is having a hard time acclimating to his new school. Your students may have some ideas on what can be done to help him. It may just also take some time, it's hard to be the new kid especially in a new country.
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Solution 67
Posted October 18, 2015 4:54 pm

Tetygy
Tetygy
Reps: 90
This move has obviously been very difficult for this student. I would begin by consulting more experienced people at my school such as my department chair and then go to the county level to find someone who can speak Japanese and provide more insight. Maybe there is a cultural difference that is making him feel uncomfortable? I think he needs somewhere to go when he gets really emotional. Maybe the counselor's office? I think they could potentially help him if they can break the language barrier.
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Solution 68
Posted June 3, 2013 7:04 am

Jessica Heilman
Jessica Heilman
Reps: 58
He may cry because America is a culture shock for him. He is very young being in 2nd grade and students that young do not adapt to change very well. Their only way of communicating this, especially if he doesn't speak the language is to cry. Also, remember that Asian families value education and if he feels he is not understanding the work, he may be afraid that he is going to get in trouble for getting bad grades. I would contact the local ESOL school and see if he can transfer there so they can better serve him.
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Stephanie Harmon
Stephanie Harmon
Reps: 84
I agree that moving is a tough experience for young children and those feelings are likely compounded by moving to a country with a different culture and language you do not understand. You make a great point that Asian families place a lot of emphasis upon education. The stress of not being able to understand the lessons in addition to the feeling that you are not going to do well in something that is so important to you can be extremely overwhelming. As an adult, I would cry too.
  Posted on: June 4, 2013 4:15 pm

Monique Cook
Monique Cook
Reps: 70
You make a good point about him not feeling successful in school also being a contribution to his crying. The teacher should probably find some type of supplemental Japanese/English resources to use so that he is still able to learn and feels that he is apart of the class.
  Posted on: June 5, 2013 2:00 pm

Colleen Keller
Colleen Keller
Reps: 92
I agree that it may be culture shock for him because he is so young and that is an extremely huge adjustment to make. I also like your comment about his communication and his view on education. I never thought of that, but that is a very good point. I also like your suggestion about ESOL to help him find somewhere that he can understand what is going on.
  Posted on: June 6, 2013 8:07 pm

Elizabeth Nicole Payne
Elizabeth Nicole Payne
Reps: 22
I think that your point about not being able to understand or do well with the school work may be adding to his crying and that this should be taken into consideration. There should be someway to break through this cultural barrier with technology.

Great post!
  Posted on: June 28, 2013 1:50 pm

upyNuX
upyNuX
Reps: 100
I didn't think about the value his family likely places on education and that he could be worried about not doing well in school.

I also found it interesting that you mentioned a "ESOL school" and I guess different school systems handle ESOL students in different ways. I'm sure it has a lot to do with the size of the district and the number of ESOL students. The county we live in is not highly populated so the school systems are relatively small and the number of ESOL student is very, very low. So there are no "ESOL schools." The school district my kids go to actually on has 4 schools in the system (PreK-2, 3-5, 6-8, 9-12).
  Posted on: October 20, 2013 9:42 pm

Cardia Foster
Cardia Foster
Reps: 73
I totally agree. When I don't understand something still as an adult, it makes me sad. It's worse on the student because he can't speak English. The thing is he may have the desire to learn, but he doesn't understand.
  Posted on: June 5, 2014 4:39 pm

Alicia Garcia
Alicia Garcia
Reps: 69
You make a good point when you suggest that he probably feels an additional element of stress because of a cultural expectation that he try his best in school. However, it is unfortunate but common that many English Language Learners do not receive the help they are entitled to from any ESOL infrastructure. In a small school district it is unlikely that there will be an ESOL school or class. If you are lucky they may have an ESOL support teacher. Even then it may be a while before the student is supported by that teacher. Often there is a huge delay in the official identification of these students so that the district can get funds to support them or the district has so few ESOL support teachers that no one who regularly come to your school or class to help you support the student. When possible collaboration with an ESOL teacher is great but it is important that you as a teacher try to provide an immediate intervention for the student.
One of the first interventions that Ioga (1995) cites as being helpful for an immigrant student is to provide a place of reprieve for a child where they can take in the culture of their new surroundings while still having a sense of attachment to things that are familiar. Try and touch base with the parents and seek a solution as a team as soon as possible so that this student can begin to learn within your class. Outside help may not arrive so you have responsibility to try and be that help.
  Posted on: June 13, 2014 1:00 am

Nick Thrower
Nick Thrower
Reps: 67
Even thought there may not be an ESOL class. Surely there will be resources available to bridge the language gap. If language isn't a good way to communicate, there are other ways as well to show that he is welcome where he is. Gifts, a culture study, even a game where he is involved can communicate that he is with people who care.
  Posted on: June 13, 2014 3:09 pm

ezasyp
ezasyp
Reps: 107
I like the fact that you mentioned Asian's value on education. I did not even think that he could be feeling overwhelmed and frustrated because he knows how important school is to his family. The teacher needs to pull from anything and everything they can to try and communicate even a little bit with this student.
  Posted on: October 6, 2014 4:12 pm

SaSyXu
SaSyXu
Reps: 105
You make an excellent point about him not understanding the material and the value that the Asian culture puts on education. This could definitely be making him cry!
  Posted on: October 7, 2014 8:32 pm

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Solution 69
Posted June 4, 2013 1:49 am

Heidi Landon
Heidi Landon
Reps: 58
Moving into a different environment at any age can be overwhelming but especially a new country with a different culture. It may be useful to find a peer that can help make it easier for him to acclimate to the new environment. You could also come up with a secret signal where if he becomes upset or overwhelmed he may move to a different area or step out of the group until he feels more comfortable. It's important to try different techniques yet be very sensitive to his feelings until he better adapts to the new situation.
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eDaNep
eDaNep
Reps: 66
I really like the secret signal idea. It's a great idea for any child who may feel overwhelmed no matter what the circumstances.
  Posted on: June 4, 2013 8:15 am

Johnnie Skelton
Johnnie Skelton
Reps: 104
I have seen teachers use this very effectively in a variety of situations. We can empower students to take control of a stressful situation by doing something as simple as making arrangements for them to go to another teacher’s room or giving them permission to excuse themselves to make a trip to the water fountain.
  Posted on: June 4, 2013 3:45 pm

Stephanie Harmon
Stephanie Harmon
Reps: 84
I really like the idea of using a secret signal to help him let you know when he is becoming too upset or overwhelmed. This way, he can leave the situation as necessary to collect himself without drawing attention that he likely does not want and also without disrupting the rest of the students in the class.
  Posted on: June 4, 2013 4:11 pm

Emilee Roberts
Emilee Roberts
Reps: 69
I too really like the idea of a secret signal! This would not only help this student, but any student.
  Posted on: June 5, 2013 9:53 am

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Solution 70
Posted June 5, 2013 1:55 pm

Monique Cook
Monique Cook
Reps: 70
You can try to communicate with the student through pictures first. It must be frustrating for both you to not be able to understand each other. I think the first step is to try to make some kind of communication with the student. From there I think you will be able to proceed with why he is crying and what you can really do to help.
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qyzeha
qyzeha
Reps: 105
I agree that using pictures is a great way to help both the teacher and student communicate with each other. Having no form of communication in a new school would be terrifying especially for a young child. Helping him learn to communicate will help the teacher find what is wrong, and hopefully help him stop crying.
  Posted on: June 5, 2013 6:20 pm

tyMaZy
tyMaZy
Reps: 26
I also agree that using picture cues could be very helpful for this student. Does he receive any ELL services? Maybe as he begins getting comfortable with the English language, he will become more comfortable in the classroom.
  Posted on: June 28, 2013 12:49 pm

Stormye Brantley
Stormye Brantley
Reps: 121
I had a similar idea. I think communicating through pictures would be an effective solution.
  Posted on: October 14, 2013 8:19 pm

jaMyDu
jaMyDu
Reps: 119
A PECS communication system would be a fabulous idea initially. I would hope that the school system would provide her with ELL services, but who knows. I also would suggest labeling things around the room in his native language as well as in English so that he can begin to see how it is written in English. I have had the opportunity to have two Japanese exchange students live with me and it was quite a culture shock for them. The way we live, our customs, and beliefs are quite different from theirs. They both attended school six days a week and did not get home from school until 4:30 PM. They had to participate in an after school activity like Tennis, Football, or Track (They did not have a choice). They also were expected to make A's and B's and if they made anything less than that then they would have shamed their family. It was quite different for them. I would also suggest having some assignments and activities written in their native language. That way they would feel like the school was making an effort towards accommodating their needs. This goes a long way in making someone feel wanted. I would also suggest maybe opening up some lines of communication with his friends back home (via Skype, email, or written letters) so he can keep up with how they are doing back home. There are many great ideas posted and these are just a few that I have.
  Posted on: October 16, 2013 5:13 pm

TuVuze
TuVuze
Reps: 99
A picture or story board could help the student become familiar with the classroom routines and procedures. Pictures could also be beneficial in helping to increase the student’s vocabulary. Also labeling items in the classroom with both English and Japanese text could help the student transition to speaking and writing in English more smoothly.
  Posted on: October 20, 2013 12:08 am

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Solution 71
Posted June 6, 2013 8:02 pm

Colleen Keller
Colleen Keller
Reps: 92
I think it would be helpful for the student to maybe draw pictures or write about what he enjoyed from Japan, and his friends. Then he could share it with the class to allow him to share his "old" life with his "new" life. You could then try and get in contact with his teacher from Japan to try and understand how he acted in Japan and what some of his interests were. Then you could try and recreate some of the things from Japan to make him feel better and more adjusted.
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Erin Ashurst
Erin Ashurst
Reps: 73
I really like your suggestion of consulting the student's former teacher. This would be a great insight into the student's needs in a way that the student's parents might not be able to express in education terms.
  Posted on: June 9, 2013 7:36 pm

aTejyh
aTejyh
Reps: 22
Yes I think it would be great to talk to his past teacher. She could even send him weekly emails from her or her class to keep in touch! Maybe the student contact with all his other friends will encourage him to want to share fun and new things he gets to do at his new school!
  Posted on: June 28, 2013 11:37 am

CI-GSU
CI-GSU
Reps: 39
Videos and computer communication would be great. This can help build confidence with the student to feel comfortable enough to share.
  Posted on: July 3, 2013 12:23 am

Josh Oglesby
Josh Oglesby
Reps: 69
I like the suggestion of having them sketch out what has them bothered. Hopefully through this representation, you will be able to gain a grasp of what the problem is. Another suggestion might be to allow him to use the internet to find images of what is causing him angst and what can be done to make him happier.
  Posted on: June 2, 2014 7:46 pm

Cardia Foster
Cardia Foster
Reps: 73
Drawing pictures is a great solution. The students could be placed in the area by himself. His drawings may even let the teacher know how he is feeling.
  Posted on: June 5, 2014 4:37 pm

ePeHyM
ePeHyM
Reps: 105
Allowing the student to draw about his his home and friend in Japan is a great idea, however because the student speaks no English the teacher would have to learn Japanese in order to communicate this idea. Just handing the student paper and markers will may not convey that he can draw about his friends and family to ease his pain. Getting in contact with his previous teacher is also a great idea however it maybe difficult to pull off and if you do pull it off may make him even more sad. Learning simple comforting phrases in Japanese, such as "We are glad you are here" and "Please don't cry", may get him to stop crying, especially if you envelope the students.It is hard to adjust to a new place especially if no one speaks your language.
  Posted on: October 12, 2014 10:06 pm

Kim Lucas
Kim Lucas
Reps: 107
Using technology is a wonderful idea to not only make your student feel comfortable but as a learning experience for all of your students. You can not only talk to the teacher from his former school, but possibly use this as a starting point for a class pen pall experience. This is a great idea and one that would be worth exploring and expanding!
  Posted on: October 20, 2014 2:57 am

aQanaD
aQanaD
Reps: 67
I know that we use former teacher's input often when we get new students from different schools. THeir insight is always very helpful. I had not considered it in this situation, and I suppose it is just because of the language barrier that would potentially exist. However, with technology and translations, I believe it could be done. I agree that allowing the child to share about life in Japan is very beneficial and helpful!
  Posted on: June 3, 2015 1:16 am

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Solution 72
Posted June 30, 2013 10:51 pm

Kris Peebles
Kris Peebles
Reps: 58
This is an interesting case. I am in training to become a high school teacher, and I love thinking about new ideas never presented to me before. My first concern would be to find the primary reason as to why the child won't stop crying. If his parents are saying that he misses his friends in Japan, that may be an indication that he misses friends in general. I bet that his language barrier is preventing him from making new friends. Therefore, I think that the teacher should try finding other similarities between the child and other students in the class. This would make bonding easier and the child could make friends.
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jaMyDu
jaMyDu
Reps: 119
I definitely agree with you on this being a possible solution to the problem. I think that the student feels like he is unable to communicate with anyone, therefore he is unable to have any type of meaningful relationship with anyone. He feels like he is on the outside looking in. If I were the teacher, I would find a few responsible students that would work with me in making him feel more at home. I would find out from his parents what his interests were and any other pertinent information that might help these students begin to form a bond with him. I would have the students try to learn some Japanese so that they can show him that they want to communicate with him and that they want to help him. They would be sort of like ambassadors to our classroom. They would make sure that he knows where everything is and would be who he would go to if he needs help. If they cannot help him, then they would come to the teacher. These ambassadors could help the teacher label objects around the classroom in both Japanese and English so that he becomes better acclimated to his environment. I believe that this would go a long way in making him feel more at home. Great post!
  Posted on: October 16, 2013 5:19 pm

Kimberly Rahn
Kimberly Rahn
Reps: 70
I think the idea of an ambassador is great! This child is probably feeling like he is not safe and can't communicate with anyone. There needs to be some type of plan put into place regarding his language barriers and get him to where he feels like he understands what is going on in the classroom.
  Posted on: June 4, 2014 12:35 am

April Rozier
April Rozier
Reps: 110
I agree that listening to the parents is a wise decision. Not only do they know the student the best, he is also able to communicate with them. If they say that he misses his friends and obviously has no way of interacting with his classmates then I believe helping him build friendships would solve the crying issue.
  Posted on: October 16, 2014 12:18 am

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Solution 73
Posted October 6, 2014 1:25 pm

zuPeQy
zuPeQy
Reps: 99
This is a difficult situation. The child is young and has been uprooted to a totally different culture. He is trying to adapt to the changes but since he doesn't know English it is hard for him to get to know other students and even his teacher. I would see if it was possible to bring a translator into the classroom, at least for a little while. That way the child could relate to someone and have a better chance of learning what is being taught. As the teacher, I would try to learn basic Japanese words to be able to communicate some with the child. I think this would be an appropriate time to have a show and tell day. All the students in the class could bring something that reminds them of their family and home. This would only work if the teacher learned some Japanese or a translator was available.
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Solution 74
Posted June 6, 2015 4:37 am

Alyssa Wright
Alyssa Wright
Reps: 69
This is a difficult situation to be in especially if one one speaks his home language. I think it may be wise to reach out to your school counselor who can put you in contact with a counselor or another adult who speaks the student's home language so that he can express his feelings to someone who fully understands. It also may be helpful if the parents of the student contact the child's friends back home and allowed him to skype or video chat a day or two a week with them. Finally, I think as the classroom teacher establishing a rapport with the student by building off of an interest with make the student feel more comfortable in the classroom.
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RuXuqe
RuXuqe
Reps: 67
I think your idea about finding someone the student can talk to in their own language is a great idea. It might be good also to find out if anyone at the school speaks Japanese. That way the student would have someone they could ask questions such as "Where's the bathroom".
  Posted on: June 7, 2015 1:44 pm

Syjetu
Syjetu
Reps: 70
I really like your solution. Contacting the counselor so that they could search for someone to speak the students language would be a wonderful idea. Anyone could pretend that they related to him; nevertheless, that would not be the case. Having someone to counsel you in your own language would be refreshing in many different ways.
  Posted on: June 10, 2015 3:06 am

Kristen Bagwell
Kristen Bagwell
Reps: 107
I hadn't thought to have the student communicate with friends from home. This is a great idea! The teacher could also have the student write letters in class or tell his new peers about his friends from Japan.
  Posted on: October 4, 2015 3:40 pm

ehyNyn
ehyNyn
Reps: 109
I like your ideas! Not only would Skype allow your Japanese student to see his friends, but it would also give your other students a chance to learn about the culture of Japan. So, you could kill two birds with one stone.
  Posted on: October 12, 2015 11:28 pm

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Solution 75
Posted December 8, 2012 9:14 pm

John Buxton
John Buxton
Reps: 114
The student is probably completely horrified by his new surroundings. I'm sure he misses his friends and family in Japan, but he is also in an environment where he can not understand anyone. I'm sure this has a horribly negative affect on the child's ability to learn. With time, his emotional state will improve, but there are things the teacher can do to help this process. Try and get some books or other teaching tools that are in Japanese and English. This will allow him to learn the material, as well as a new language. The most important thing is to create a supportive environment for the child.
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Kyle Chambers
Kyle Chambers
Reps: 68
John,

I like your idea about having materials that are in both Japanese and English. This could also help the student feel more "at home" while in the classroom. I know that when I have visited other countries in the past, I would immediately feel more at ease when I saw a sign or book in English.
  Posted on: June 9, 2013 8:44 pm

Hope Crosby
Hope Crosby
Reps: 122
I agree that the child is most likely completely and utterly horrified and out of place. I like your idea of finding resources/tools to help make the Japanese to English transition easier on the child. With so many online tools and apps available I'm certain that there are tools that can be used to help the child adjust to his new surroundings.


  Posted on: October 18, 2013 6:41 pm

uzyXuV
uzyXuV
Reps: 208
That's a good idea to include reading materials and any other resources in his native language.
  Posted on: October 18, 2015 12:45 am

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Solution 76
Posted February 17, 2013 2:41 pm

Susanna Yawn
Susanna Yawn
Reps: 20
i would be very overwhelmed if i had a student who does not speak any english and cries a lot. It would be hard to take care of him while still teaching the whole class. I think he is crying because he misses his culture where he knew the langauge, knew the students, and knew how the culture worked. it might help if you print off work for this student that is written in Japanese and maybe even try to learn some of the basics of the language to communicate a little to the child where they feel loved. Try to get him involved at recess with the other kids.
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yJaGus
yJaGus
Reps: 106
This could be good but it also may make him feel isolated because he has different work from the other students. I do like the idea of learning the basics of his language to help him out but that may become overwhelming for the teacher if you have lots of students that do not speak English.
  Posted on: October 20, 2013 8:35 pm

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Solution 77
Posted June 4, 2013 8:14 am

eDaNep
eDaNep
Reps: 66
There are several Japanese students in my area due to a local Japanese company. They often move to the United States speaking little or no English. Communication is such an important aspect of life that I'm sure he feels scared that he is unable to understand others or be understood himself. I think the primary way to help this student is to find a way to help him communicate with you and the students in the classroom. Try using Japanese translators found online or even try pictures to communicate. His parents may be a help; however, keep in mind that they may also speak little English. Perhaps you could even provide him with a Japanese English dictionary. My husband works for the Japanese company in town and most of his Japanese co-workers carry a pocket dictionary with them everywhere, some even have apps on their phones. You may need to try several methods to find what works best for him. Give him time to get used to his new surroundings. Be supportive and don't get frustrated. He's only been here a short time. It is still very overwhelming to have moved away from his home to a country where he feels lost and alone.
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Jordan Nelms
Jordan Nelms
Reps: 104
I agree that finding a way to communicate with him is crucial! By doing this, you would be able to reassure him and make him feel more welcome. Also, allow him to bring something with him from home that reminds him of Japan, this may help comfort him during this time.
  Posted on: October 20, 2014 3:44 am

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Solution 78
Posted June 4, 2013 4:08 pm

Johnnie Skelton
Johnnie Skelton
Reps: 104
If I were in his situation, I think that I would cry, too! For a second grader, it must feel as though he has moved to another planet. Children are incredibly adaptive, but that doesn’t mean it is easy. This move has probably caused him to feel insecure, and it sounds as though his parents may not be as supportive as he needs for them to be right now.
Others have posted some great suggestions to this very difficult situation, such as labeling items around the classroom to help him as he begins to learn English and assigning him a class “buddy” to make him feel more secure. Assistive technology to help him translate would also be helpful. This is truly a situation that is going to take time to resolve, since this move was so sudden for him, and since he doesn’t speak any English at all.
Helping him to move forward may not take a single solution but a combination of many small steps.
One small step that I might suggest is to put him in charge of taking care of the class pet. Sometimes a person can relate to an animal, even when he or she is not ready to develop a relationship with another person. If you don’t have a class pet, buy a beta. It will be a worthwhile investment.
Also, helping him to maintain some of his friendships from Japan may help him to feel less alone while he is adjusting to his new life. I would suggest setting up an international pen pal, not just for him but for the entire class. This will be beneficial for all of the students, and it would enable him to be involved in what everyone else is doing.
Finally, reach out to the school counselor. This student may need more help than you can give him alone.
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Carol Whitfield
Carol Whitfield
Reps: 56
I agree. A "buddy" system might be adequate for this situation. Kind people and helpful people make life easier, and the child is missing the warmth and protection of this friends. It's necessary for the teacher to take an active role in establishing a buddy for the child and also contacting the parents as well.
  Posted on: June 6, 2013 10:27 am

Kimberly Spicer
Kimberly Spicer
Reps: 71
I really love your ideas! Taking care of a class pet or having some really important job in the classroom would probably really help! I also think having pen pals will really help him connect his "new" life to his "old" life. Taking pictures with his new class and sending them to Japan with his letters...fun pictures, for example goofy pics, scary pics, ninja pics, etc. If the teacher has the capability, maybe the student can eventually Skype or video chat with his classmates from Japan.
I agree with your statement that explains it might not take one solution, but a combination of solutions. It will also take time...Rome wasn't built in a day. :)
  Posted on: June 9, 2013 9:19 pm

Laura Toft
Laura Toft
Reps: 71
Great idea! I think the class pet would be an awesome way for the child to have responsibility and feel self worth in a classroom full of people he is unsure about. I agree with how you would feel scared too- I can't imagine moving across the world and not know the language.
  Posted on: June 2, 2014 9:33 pm

LaChristen Boyd
LaChristen Boyd
Reps: 68
I never thought about assigning him a buddy. That would an excellent way to help him adapt and feel more comfortable here. Even if the buddy doesn't understand his language non- verbal communication would help him as well.
  Posted on: June 4, 2014 8:35 pm

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Solution 79
Posted June 5, 2013 6:15 pm

qyzeha
qyzeha
Reps: 105
I think the student is crying because moving to a new school can very scary. This student is not only having to adapt to a new school, but he has to adapt to going to a new school in a new country where there is nobody he can communicate with. The student is probably completely overwhelmed by how different his new school in the United States is from his school in Japan. It would be extremely difficult to make this student feel more comfortable at school because there is nobody that he can communicate with. I think it would be a great idea to try to teach all the students common greetings like hello or goodbye in Japanese so the other students can at least speak to him at some point in the day. It would also be helpful to have the picture cards for the student with both Japanese words and English words on them to help him begin to learn the English language. This will hopefully help the student feel more comfortable interacting with his classmates and new school which will hopefully help him stop crying.
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tyMaZy
tyMaZy
Reps: 26
I agree that teaching the other students common greetings in Japanese would help the student feel more comfortable and involved in the class. It is important that every students' individualities are accommodated and nurtured.
  Posted on: June 28, 2013 12:53 pm

Mallory Kirkland
Mallory Kirkland
Reps: 26
I love having the idea of incorporating Japanese into the classroom. This way, the student can have some kind of a connection to the classroom, and he will not feel totally alone when he enters. Great thought!
  Posted on: July 1, 2013 2:31 pm

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Solution 80
Posted June 9, 2013 8:25 pm

Love Joy
Love Joy
Reps: 78
Not having contact with the parents during the day is difficult. You have to do what is necessary when you have a dissatisfied student. Finding resources is the key to being successful. I would locate a translator either in a store or on the web. This would open up communication between the student and I. Then I would allow other students to use it because that would be the students' comfort zone. Students are more tech saavy than adults. This could be the communication link the student needs. Then present rewards in some form for the student to work towards in order to become successful and to stop crying. Crying is filling a void. Finding that void is essential to finding success for the student. Then once you and your other students can communicate with the student, you can then initiate class opportunities and learning opportunities. Incorporating other cultures and languages into the classroom will then help. You may have a hispanic student who could help with this translation. Also, using music will help the student bring their culture into the classroom. Allow the student to teach a song or dance to class. This will help the student open up more knowing that they know something no one else knows.
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udydyV
udydyV
Reps: 108
Crying is filling a void because the student feels all alone. The teacher could ask the parents to send in a small picture of the family to place on the student's desk. This may help fill the void (at least until the student becomes acclimated to his new surroundings).
  Posted on: October 17, 2013 7:17 am

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Solution 81
Posted June 9, 2013 8:42 pm

Kyle Chambers
Kyle Chambers
Reps: 68
This particular student in 2nd grade is probably going through a range of emotions. He is more than likely scared, nervous, sad, and homesick. Also, with this student speaking little to no English, it would be hard for him to communicate his emotions with others as well as acclamate himself to his peers. He finds himself in a very frustrating situation, one in which he did not choose. However, there could be ways in which the teacher could attempt to assimilate this student into the classroom. The first thing I would do is to communicate with the parents on their terms. Whatever the parents feel could help the student become comfortable, I would try it without hesitation. This could include having the child bring items from home that could make him feel comfortable in the classroom. I would also try and pair the student's family with another family of a child in my classroom. I would explain the situation to that family and ask for them to take the family and the child help them acclamate them into the American culture. This could also cause the Japanese student to have a friend that would comfort him in the classroom. As far as the immediate reaction, I would take the student out of the classroom and allow him to calm down so that other students do not become overly distracted and it also prevents the Japanese student from becoming embarassed.
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Solution 82
Posted June 9, 2013 8:51 pm

L. Carrell
L. Carrell
Reps: 63
The young boy is probably missing his friends back in Japan, but that is probably not the only reason why he is continuously crying. Try talking with the parents to see what they do for him at home when he cries. If they say that he does not cry at home, ask the parents about activities that he enjoys. Are there any things in art he likes to do? What are some of the things that comfort him? What were some of the things he enjoyed in Japan? Then try some of these things in your classroom. If you are able to find out things he liked in Japan, maybe you can use these in a lesson about Japan that he would get excited about and the other students would get interested in his culture.
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Solution 83
Posted June 9, 2013 9:11 pm

Kimberly Spicer
Kimberly Spicer
Reps: 71
Teaching Pre-K in my class last year, I have a lot of experience with students crying. They cry because they are scared, they miss their friends, they cannot communicate with anyone, etc. The same way a toddler or baby cries when he/she cannot communicate with someone, this boy is doing the same thing. In my experience with my own child having a difficult time in his own Pre-K class, the only thing/person that would be able to calm him down was a fifth grade female student.
I think the teacher needs to not only learn a few Japanese phrases in order to communicate with the child, but he also needs to find an older student that can be right there at school to comfort him. A mention a student as the mentor because a student has the same position he does...not as scary. I think also having the child bring in some pictures of his friends or his favorite things in his country to school would help him, too.
When something doesn't work, just keep trying anything.
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maTepe
maTepe
Reps: 22
I liked your idea about learning some words and phrases to make him feel more comfortable. I also like the idea about assigning a mentor to this student. I think that if the mentor learned about the students culture and tried to communicate some with the student it would help.
  Posted on: June 28, 2013 11:35 am

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Solution 84
Posted June 9, 2013 10:38 pm

Kelly Jackson
Kelly Jackson
Reps: 103
I would want to get the school counselor involved. This could be a more serious issue and crying is just an attempt to get help. In the classroom the student needs to be in a supportive, comforting, and welcoming environment. Friendly smiles could help in times of crying. I would really try to build a relationship with the student. Language is a huge hurdle in this situation but there are gestures that could be used to offer comfort without having to utilize language. Learning English is a must for this student so I would ask for help from an ELL special education teacher. This could increase his chance of learning English and will then increase his ability to form relationship with other students in the class, possibly creating new friendships.
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Tracy C
Tracy C
Reps: 104
I would not jump to any conclusion too quickly. It maybe wise to lessen the number of new faces in the classroom to avoid overwhelming the student further. The key right now is parent involvement. The teacher must rely on information from the parents to meet the student's needs.
  Posted on: October 17, 2013 9:05 pm

Haley Moore
Haley Moore
Reps: 31
I agree that jumping to conclusions will not help the situation, and I also agree that listening to the parents is imperative to make sure all important information is used to ensure the student is comfortable.
  Posted on: June 5, 2014 5:30 pm

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Solution 85
Posted June 9, 2013 10:53 pm

yVyLyG
yVyLyG
Reps: 69
I think many of the solutions already provided such as having the student speak with a counselor and talking to the parents further so that they understand the situation are valid and most responsible. A student with this level of communication barrier and such limited access to his culture and language needs intervention in order to determine what is causing his emotional outbursts. Simply taking the parents word that he is just sad he is missing his friends is not enough, considering his multiple expressions and seemingly uncontrollable crying. Referring him to a professional for assistance and incorporating the parents in the process would be the absolute first steps. On a lower level, finding students that he may have something in common with and initiating a prompt where the student can "teach" either a small group or the class words and ideas in Japanese may assist him in communicating and eventually making friends.
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Kris Peebles
Kris Peebles
Reps: 58
Nice advice. I also agree that all resources should be used--including paraprofessionals and school counselors. After all, that's what they are there for. Finding the root of the problem is the key. I enjoyed reading your post.
  Posted on: June 30, 2013 11:02 pm

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Solution 86
Posted June 28, 2013 1:45 pm

Elizabeth Nicole Payne
Elizabeth Nicole Payne
Reps: 22
Wow! This is a major issue! I think that it is probably a mix of everything causing the child to cry! He is in a new country away from friends, family, school,and life in general of what he is used to knowing and doing. On top of all that he is in a silent world because he can not talk to or understand anyone around him. I think that the counselor and administration should get involved it is really hard to be the individual teacher in the classroom dealing with this I would scream for help!
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yZaveh
yZaveh
Reps: 109
I think the counselor could definitely help; unfortunately, I feel like this would be an issue the administration would expect the teacher to deal with. What could you do in the meantime to keep the student from crying in class every day while waiting for the guidance office to come up with a solution to the problem? Perhaps you could find class material about Japan so that he has something familiar while you are still teaching all students.
  Posted on: October 10, 2013 6:14 pm

LaChristen Boyd
LaChristen Boyd
Reps: 68
This is mind blowing having to deal with this on a daily basis and when neither one of you can understand each other. I agree that you have to get administration and counselors involved. By doing so you can get help and exposure to valuable resources that may help the student.
  Posted on: June 4, 2014 8:31 pm

Alisha Wesley-Moore
Alisha Wesley-Moore
Reps: 60
Administration and counselor are definitely needed in this situation. As I suggested in a solution, they need to discuss an English tutor or a translator until he is comfortable with communicating in the classroom. This needs to be done immediately or he will fall behind.
  Posted on: June 17, 2014 9:42 pm

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Solution 87
Posted June 28, 2013 8:30 pm

PyruNe
PyruNe
Reps: 47
The student probably cries due to feelings of isolation and loneliness. Additionally he probably suffers from confusion about what is expected of him in class since he is unable to communicate with those around him. Consequently, his tears probably stem more from of frustration than any other feeling. Young children typically love structure and feeling secure in their surroundings. In this instance, I believe this child is suffering from the absence of these components in his daily routine.

One possible solution to helping him feel more secure might be to ask his parents to allow him to bring some small memento of home to school with him so that when he feels sad he can use it to comfort himself. Another solution might be to designate another student in the class to be his buddy and help him learn the routines of the class and to navigate the building. Having a buddy to help him will allow him to become comfortable in his surroundings and learn classroom routines and expectations. Also, the teacher might try making a visit to the child's home so that he can become comfortable with him in an alternate setting. This visit may help to alleviate some of the child's discomfort and lessen the formality associated with school. Finally, the teacher might ask the child's parents to volunteer to help with a classroom activity or perhaps do a presentation on their native country in which they share information on their culture and traditions. These efforts may help the young boy to feel less self-conscious and more accepted by his peers and the adults at the school.
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Kimberly Stuckey
Kimberly Stuckey
Reps: 18
I agree that the child suffers from isolation, loneliness, and confusion. Creating a community of learners in the classroom is key. I found your solution/suggestion for the parents to conduct a presentation on their native country to allow other students in the class the opportunity to ask questions and gain knowledge of the student’s background. This activity addresses the differences and provides the students with a multicultural experience.
  Posted on: July 1, 2013 5:35 pm

Zak Giebner
Zak Giebner
Reps: 5
I can relate to the importance of nurturing a community of learners to help eventually get this student on a more joyous path conducive to learning. I was interested to see if anyone knew of a good way to have a video conference call that could somehow address the time difference between the United States and Japan. From a previous comment, I saw the use of vocabulary lists was important to building such a learning community, so maybe a recording could be done each day in which both groups of students go over their respective languages' version of a word, and then share with each other as sort of a pre-recorded video conference call.
  Posted on: July 3, 2013 4:43 pm

upyNuX
upyNuX
Reps: 100
I love the idea of visiting the student in his home. I would think this would be a great way to show him you truly care about him and how he is doing. It may also help him to relax a little with you so that as he learns English he will be more willing to open up to you.
  Posted on: October 20, 2013 9:38 pm

aBugeS
aBugeS
Reps: 77
I completely agree that the child feel lonely and out of place. The best solution would be for him to share his experiences back home with his classmates and being to make new friends and new experiences.
  Posted on: June 9, 2014 3:24 pm

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Solution 88
Posted June 28, 2013 8:37 pm

PyruNe
PyruNe
Reps: 47
One additional solution that I thought might be helpful would be to allow the Japanese student to teach the other children in the class how to do something from his culture, like how to use chopsticks. Another thing that could be done would be to let him teach the other students how to say the names of common objects in Japanese and they in turn would teach him the English words. These efforts might also help to bring a feeling of unity to the class so that all are concerned with learning about the others culture.
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Tracy C
Tracy C
Reps: 104
I would also see if there's an older student in the school whose native language is Japanese that I can use as a peer buddy for my student. The peer buddy can be used as a source of comfort and a communication tool between the student and I.
  Posted on: October 17, 2013 8:58 pm

yJaGus
yJaGus
Reps: 106
That is a very neat way to help the student become comfortable in the class. By showing him you care about his culture and want to learn more it will inspire him to learn the language quicker so that he can express things to you.
  Posted on: October 20, 2013 8:34 pm

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Solution 89
Posted July 1, 2013 2:30 pm

Mallory Kirkland
Mallory Kirkland
Reps: 26
The student most likely cries for the same reason that his parents told the teacher. If I moved to a new country where nobody spoke my language or really understood me, I would be very depressed. Also, he is young, so he does not seem to be able to handle the transition emotionally.
I would select two people from the class who you know are good kids. I would see if they can try to be the student's buddy throughout the day and show him around, play with him, and talk to him. In this respect, other students will catch on and start being friends with the new student, also. Then, all of the students start learning more about each other culturally, and the new student will begin to feel more comfortable in his new home.
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tyMaZy
tyMaZy
Reps: 26
I like your idea of having two other students from the class get to know the new student. My suggestions were all things that the teacher should do, but I like your idea of assigning students to try and help.
  Posted on: July 1, 2013 6:35 pm

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Solution 90
Posted July 3, 2013 12:18 am

CI-GSU
CI-GSU
Reps: 39
I personally wouldn't not rule out the parents suggestions and response to your concern. Next, I would try to include his culture education into the instruction regularly. Even system photos, books, magazines, dictionary translations (with both english/Japanese) would be o.k. to include in centers and areas of the classroom. I would check out movies/ videos etc that would help him even relate and communicate with me and the classmates. Feeling alone and or left our in a totally different country isn't easy and it can make one very sad. Even utilizing translations from the computer may help with the situation because surely he can read and write. Also, involving the counselor to assist in helping with materials and sessions would be great. The parent should be invited to as many as possible to help the student feel more comfortable or more apt to participate and want to share feelings openingly.
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Solution 91
Posted July 3, 2013 8:24 am

Virginia Erbele
Virginia Erbele
Reps: 25
Poor guy! He probably feels very alone and frightened. Honestly, I might behave similarly in an unfamiliar country in which I understood little to nothing my peers were saying, had no one to talk to, and was expected to do school work at the same time. I’m sure he’s feeling isolated and not understood by anyone. To help assuage his crying (and help the other students refocus), I would try to make him feel more “at home”. For example, you could find out where in Japan he is from and post pictures from his town/city. You could create a bulletin board with some pictures of familiar things for him. Perhaps, teaching the whole class a few Japanese words would also help. Learning a few basic commands and sentences yourself may be helpful. Maybe, label items in the classroom with Japanese and English labels (and any other language spoken by other students?). You could have a few multicultural lessons in which various student cultures are highlighted. These may include authentic food and games from the cultures. It might be a good idea to research what a typical Japanese classroom is like. Do they sit at desks, at tables, on the floor? Maybe have a few days in which your classroom is set up similarly. I would try to incorporate as much from his country as possible to help him feel that the class is interested in him, that the teacher cares, and that he’s not all alone after all.
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Qureby
Qureby
Reps: 102
I love the idea of using dual labels on things around the classroom. I had not thought of that as part of my solution. It would definitely help the student be able to communicate his needs while his classmates learn a bit of another language.
  Posted on: October 19, 2014 1:36 pm

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Solution 92
Posted October 1, 2013 8:45 pm

Emily West
Emily West
Reps: 102
I think this is a sensitive time for a child as young as second grade to move to a completely different part of the world. He probably misses his friends more than anything else, but not just his specific friends, the companionships and relationships he had built with his friends. This is a very difficult situation because he speaks only Japanese and no english. I would attempt to communicate with him in ways that do not necessarily involve words. Maybe looking at pictures together and expressing different emotions. It would be helpful if there were someone that could come in and help to translate words for him. Creating a relationship or friendship with someone does not necessarily require talking. He can begin to feel more comfortable when students and teachers offer simple kind gestures, such as sitting next to him at lunch or playing with him at recess.
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Meredith Bryant
Meredith Bryant
Reps: 106
I think nonverbal communication is key in this situation. If he can feel connected to you, as the teacher, through a picture or drawing or doing something together, he is likely to feel more comfortable in your classroom. Also, if you can begin to group your students accordingly so that everyone may participate in this nonverbal activity, whatever it may be, the more likely he will begin to feel like he belongs to the group. I truly believe part of his sensitivity is the fact that he feels the barrier between him and his other classmates. He is in a completely new environment and one where he feels he doesn't belong.
  Posted on: October 19, 2013 9:21 pm

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Solution 93
Posted October 12, 2013 5:32 pm

Jordyn Nail
Jordyn Nail
Reps: 108
It seems as though your student may be in the fourth stage of uprooting. This is the culture shock phase and the phase in which the student is depressed and confused. The student may be comparing himself to the "mainstream" children, he may feel hopeless of ever belonging to that group.

You can use certain strategies that will help the student feel like they belong. One strategy would be to assign the student a partner. Choose a polite student who does not struggle. They can do group work together. This will help the student make a friend. Another strategy is to incorporate the Japanese culture into the classroom.
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Whitney Johnson
Whitney Johnson
Reps: 97
I think that the buddy strategy is an excellent choice to this situation. An "Around the World" project might be helpful too.
  Posted on: October 20, 2014 1:12 am

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Solution 94
Posted October 12, 2013 6:48 pm

udydyV
udydyV
Reps: 108
The student has been through a lot. The first thing I would do is to attempt to communicate with the student in his native language. I would write a letter to him and use a translator app to translate it in Japanese. Then I would assign a peer buddy to help the student develop some type of friendship. In addition, I would conduct an FBA to determine if there were any external triggers that were causing the student to cry. Finally, I would consult with school counselor to establish a place and time the student could meet with the counselor for one on one sessions.
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LeHyZa
LeHyZa
Reps: 107
You have a great action plan. I love the idea of composing a personal letter to give to the student. I would imagine this would make him feel like you genuinely care about his presence in your classroom. I also think the student needs to express his feelings to someone at the school and a counselor may be the right person to do that with if the language barrier can be sorted out.
  Posted on: October 20, 2014 12:01 am

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Solution 95
Posted October 13, 2013 10:22 am

A Battles
A Battles
Reps: 115
This would be a tough situation due to the language barrier. I would assign him a "buddy" (a peer tutor of sorts) and switch the buddy every week. This way the new student can get to know the different students in the class and hopefully the students can provide him with non-judgmental exposure to English and classroom experiences. I feel at this early age the kids in the classroom would be very open to sitting and working with him. The child could be provided picture cards or action figures/toys and be allowed to set up a story or a scenario. Maybe these things could provide him with some sense of belonging. Of course it would not replace his Japanese friends but could be a start to building new friendships.
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Jessica Briley
Jessica Briley
Reps: 109
I really like this idea of an "assigned buddy." It does seem as though kids at this age are very eager to learn more about others and see if they can help. They are innately curious and sometimes mostly eager to please. I like the idea of switching of buddies too, because one student may be able to help in different areas than the previous student.
  Posted on: October 17, 2013 1:48 pm

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Solution 96
Posted October 13, 2013 11:18 am

BazuTy
BazuTy
Reps: 116
I would ask for immediately assistance with the counselor about the issue. The student is having issues with relocating and adjusting to the new culture. Seeking programs that are available in the community is a great idea. Also implementing things about Japan into the classroom environment is an essential for the student.
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Solution 97
Posted October 17, 2013 1:45 pm

Jessica Briley
Jessica Briley
Reps: 109
This is such a sad situation. It is also very stressful for EVERYONE involved. The teacher has to be creative and sensitive with this problem. The students need to learn how to respect their new peer. And the new child must adapt to a completely foreign atmosphere. I think it would be nice if the teacher were to introduce a Japanese word or two everyday in class and then teach the new student the english word and how to say it correctly. I think it might be nice if the parents could come in (if they speak English?) and speak to the students about their son and where they are from. Hopefully this will make the students realize that their new peer may need some extra help and time to adjust.
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Amy Fletcher
Amy Fletcher
Reps: 67
I like your suggestion of introducing a new Japanese word or two a day. This would help the other students identify with the boy's culture as well as help the boy feel comfortable in his new environment. It will make trust you as the teacher and start connecting to his new classmates.
  Posted on: June 4, 2014 11:23 pm

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Solution 98
Posted October 19, 2013 9:18 pm

Meredith Bryant
Meredith Bryant
Reps: 106
I think the best thing you can do (if not one of the only things you can do) in this situation is to show the child that you truly care about them. Make this student as comfortable as you possibly can in your classroom, so that at least he might stop crying if he feels your genuine concern. My next step would be to try to pull a group of selected students aside and explain to them that this student really needs a friend. Ask them, "Do you think you could be his good friend?" Slowly begin to work him into that group so that he feels connected and a part of something bigger. I believe part of this issue is not only the separation of his surroundings and his friends, but also because he just doesn't feel like he feels in or belongs. When he does start crying and begins to distract other students, pull him aside and have him focus on something else to steer his mind away from the reason he is upset and also away from your other students.
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yZaveh
yZaveh
Reps: 109
I like how your focus is on making sure the student feels cared about. He should feel love coming from both the teacher and the student, and I think cultivating the culture of the classroom starting from the first day of school is important for making this happen.
  Posted on: October 20, 2013 8:33 pm

Kayla Mullins
Kayla Mullins
Reps: 89
I think comforting the student is the best way to help the situation. Also get the class involved and help them understand the change this student is facing. Students like to be involved and usually like to help when they feel needed.
-Kayla Mullins
  Posted on: October 16, 2014 2:55 am

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Solution 99
Posted October 19, 2013 11:45 pm

TuVuze
TuVuze
Reps: 99
The reason the student is crying is most likely due to the psychological stress related to the loss of his previous surroundings and friends (Spring, 2007). He is also immersed in a new culture in which he does not understand the language and this is understandably a frustrating situation for the young student. Additionally, the student could also be feeling isolated and lonely. To help the student feel more at ease, the teacher might want to learn some words and phrases in Japanese to help the student feel more comfortable. Also, the school counselor could be of assistance to the student. To stop the crying, you could pair the student with another classmate or a few classmates at a time. You could allow a different set of students (approximately 1-3) per week to have the privilege of interacting with the new student intensively so that he does not feel a sense of disconnection from the class or school environment. The peers would serve as guides and the new student could shadow them as they help him to discover the nuances, routines, and overall setting within the school’s environment.



Reference

Spring, Joel. (2007). The intersection of cultures: Multicultural education in the Unites States and the global economy (4th ed.). New York, NY: Routledge
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Jordyn Nail
Jordyn Nail
Reps: 108
Great idea! I think that interaction with the other children is key for this student's comfort. Also, the social interaction with people his age will help him become accustomed with the language and traditions of the American culture. The children with whom he is paired with will also benefit from this interaction.
  Posted on: October 20, 2013 12:46 pm

Josh Oglesby
Josh Oglesby
Reps: 69
I agree that interaction may be the key to helping this young student. It would be phenominal if the students and he could find a way to connect through the language barrier in a way that would allow the student some sort of outlet for his crying. My only fear is his inability to speak English being a barrier that the other students cannot get over and leave him stranded.
  Posted on: June 2, 2014 7:48 pm

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Solution 100
Posted October 20, 2013 8:33 pm

yJaGus
yJaGus
Reps: 106
Coming from experience the only thing you can do to help this child is to make sure they feel comfortable in your room. They will eventually catch on to the English language if they are instructed correctly. If you can somehow make him feel very welcome in your classroom he will eventually get comfortable enough to stop crying. I'm sure the main reason for his crying is the lack of knowledge he needs so that he can learn, separation from his parents and friends, and not having any friends where he is now. Helping him to adapt in any way you can will help get him through the tears.
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Alisha Wesley-Moore
Alisha Wesley-Moore
Reps: 60
Adapt, adjust, and overcome. The child will eventually adapt, but yes, they need to make him comfortable and put forth effort to help him along the way. Once he adapts he can adjust. He is accustom to Japanese culture so he now needs to adjust to the American culture. Then he can overcome all those feelings that make him cry. Of course he will continue to miss Japan but he can definitely start feeling better about the situation.
  Posted on: June 17, 2014 9:48 pm

LeHyZa
LeHyZa
Reps: 107
A part of the issue aside from missing friends and being in a whole new environment may be the differences in American and Japanese cultures. Japanese societies work more cohesively as a team and perhaps this student feels isolated. He may interpret the individualist culture as being unkind and cold. A class activity where group projects are conducted may help him make new friends and see a new side to the American culture.
  Posted on: October 19, 2014 11:58 pm

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Solution 101
Posted October 20, 2013 9:13 pm

BazuTy
BazuTy
Reps: 116
Langauge barriers and migration itself are factors that are contributing to the little boy emotions. He is culture shock and feel isolated because of the unfamiliar environment. I understand the parents are full-time workers, but in order to have success with the student, the teacher and parents have to be on one accord. Community support is also something both the student and parents can benefit from.
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Solution 102
Posted June 2, 2014 7:44 pm

Josh Oglesby
Josh Oglesby
Reps: 69
I feel for you if you have a student who does not speak English and you have no way of translating or anyone to help. Solving this mystery is one that may take awhile, especially considering the age of the student and the language barrier. I have a 6 yr old son who i can barely understand what has upset him on a good day. I believe that the source of the crying could be anything from the missing of friends and family to being afraid of everything around him. It could also be standard 2nd grade things that affect all students such as new teachers or new classmates. To get ahold of why he is crying, my suggestion would be a parent-teacher conference with the student present(if they can speak english). If not, then somehow a translator has to come in from a RESA or agency to help if at all possible so that you can get a handle on fixing the problem. It is my belief that until you find out what the problem is, you cannot even begin to fix it.
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Michael Herndon
Michael Herndon
Reps: 68
Having a conference with a translator is a great solution. You can talk to the parents and the students to try to find out what is causing the student to cry and see if there is anything you can do to help alleviate the problem.
  Posted on: June 3, 2014 9:18 pm

Jennifer Loncon
Jennifer Loncon
Reps: 68
I definitely think that a parent conference is necessary to discuss ways that may be helpful in making the transition easier. Parents may be able to offer more specific suggestions about what could make him feel more comfortable. RESA would be a great resource to turn to if the parents do not speak English.
  Posted on: June 6, 2014 2:03 am

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Solution 103
Posted June 3, 2014 3:49 am

Rachel Walker
Rachel Walker
Reps: 60
I think that one possible solution would be to contact his parents and ask to allow him to have journal time at school. During this time he could write letters to his friends back in Japan. He could tell them about his day, the things he is struggling with, the things he is learning, and just other things of those manners. He could also write it in Japanese. I think that it would allow him to process his emotions in a more constructive (and less distracting) way.
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Tiffany Parker
Tiffany Parker
Reps: 69
I really like your journal time idea for the Japanese student! This would be a great time for the student to reflect on his/her day and write to their friends overseas. This would also help make the student feel more comfortable. Great idea!
  Posted on: June 7, 2014 2:25 pm

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Solution 104
Posted June 3, 2014 6:10 pm

Sara LeClair
Sara LeClair
Reps: 68
The student probably does miss his friends to an extent, but he probably misses fitting in and being accepted more. In the US, he has to fit into the norms of our culture, and this is probably really hard for him. Some kids remain silent at new schools and new surroundings, but maybe his way of dealing was to cry and let his emotions out. Like the teacher in the book sets up an art table, there may be a way for the teacher to find a coping mechanism for the student so he will not distract the other children: such as drawing, coloring, or reading.
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Krissy Chance-Bailey
Krissy Chance-Bailey
Reps: 65
I would use the strategies discussed in Cristina Igo,s book "The Inner World of the Immigrant Child and introduce the young boy to the ESL class at school, inform the teacher and provide a safe place for the boy at school when his emotions begin to take over. If this were the case with any other student we would send them to the counselors office.
  Posted on: June 12, 2014 12:50 pm

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Solution 105
Posted June 3, 2014 9:16 pm

Michael Herndon
Michael Herndon
Reps: 68
He may miss his friends back in Japan or he may simply be scared being in a new country and not speaking the language. I would attempt to learn a little bit of Japanese so I could communicate with him a little. I would also encourage other students to try to interact with him and play with him. Having other students around him may help him learn English and having new friends may lead to him missing home less and may eliminate the crying.
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Solution 106
Posted June 6, 2014 1:38 am

Caley Copeland
Caley Copeland
Reps: 69
The student is crying because he is going through a culture shock. He has had to pick up everything and everyone he knows and leave it behind in Japan. This little guy is going through a big adjustment and it will just take some time. There are some things you can do to make this transition easier. I would recommend talking to the counselor and/or ESOL teacher at your school. Discuss what is going on and ask for their advice in the matter. Young children also take comfort in material things, so maybe there is something from his home that he can bring to school and keep with him. Something small that he could keep in his cubby/desk that wouldn’t be a distraction to the others, but would bring him comfort. You could also have him draw pictures of Japan for the class to see what it is like.
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Solution 107
Posted June 6, 2014 1:58 am

Jennifer Loncon
Jennifer Loncon
Reps: 68
I would suggest starting by trying ways to make him feel more "at home" in his new classroom. He has to be overwhelmed and maybe just needs a sign of comfort. Perhaps offering for him to bring in one small item to keep with him that he can look at and hold throughout the day when he is feeling overwhelmed or scared. Since his parents say he misses his friends, maybe a picture of him and his friends if he has one. Then I would try to find time to sit with him and communicate, such as through artwork, so that he can convey his thoughts and feelings.
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Solution 108
Posted June 6, 2014 2:10 am

wendy burns
wendy burns
Reps: 80
The teacher is this situation is going to need to help this child make a connection with his environment and encourage friendships with other students in the classroom. It might help to find out some things about the child's culture and include those things in the classroom. There maybe something the child likes the parents can share with the teacher, for example a favorite game that he likes to play.
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Solution 109
Posted June 8, 2014 7:27 pm

Cierra` Barksdale
Cierra` Barksdale
Reps: 61
I think he cries everyday not only because he misses his friends in Japan but also because he is in a new, different, and strange place. It can be difficult to adjust to a new place but in this case I think the student is intimidated because he’s in a new place where no one speaks the same language as he does and the culture is so different. I would contact the parents and notify them of various activities that I would be implementing in the classroom to help him feel more comfortable. To help him adjust and stop crying, I would try to learn some Japanese phrases to make him feel more comfortable. I would also make it a learning experience for the other children in the classroom so that they as well as he would not feel excluded. I would also try playing familiar children’s songs in Japanese to make him feel better. To further the learning experience I would take our weekly spelling words and translate them into Japanese so that the other children would also learn how to say those common words in Japanese. I think another way to make him feel comfortable would be to have him bring his favorite authentic Japanese food to school to eat; I think it would help if each child did this but also brought enough to share with the other students so that they could bond and get to know one another. If he begins to cry in class I think it would help if I sang a familiar Japanese song to him; one that would soothe him and make him feel better.
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egyveW
egyveW
Reps: 103
I like your ideas of food and music to get the other students engaged with this students. I think that would go a long way in making the child feel more comfortable in the new environment.
  Posted on: October 19, 2014 11:55 am

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Solution 110
Posted June 9, 2014 2:59 pm

aBugeS
aBugeS
Reps: 77
I believe he cries because he feels out of place in the classroom. I think the key to getting him to stop crying would be integration. He needs to make new friends. Maybe have him share something from home that he enjoys with the rest of the students and encourage other students to be welcoming to him. Time will correct this but the teacher can help to improve it by making the student feel at more at home in the classroom. The teacher needs to move quickly on this because if other students are becoming annoyed then they may begin to bully him. The teacher needs to be preemptive in stopping this from happening.
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LeeAnna Elder
LeeAnna Elder
Reps: 75
True the teacher needs to find the root cause to the crying. The child feels alienated, and unfamiliar with his new surroundings. I think placing him on one of the RTI tiers and creating a plan to move this student from crying and misery to a self sufficient and happy thriving student within the school setting is a good approach.
  Posted on: June 13, 2014 5:25 pm

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Solution 111
Posted June 13, 2014 12:43 am

Alicia Garcia
Alicia Garcia
Reps: 69
Your new student must feel overwhelmed. I imagine you may be also. According to Cristina Ioga (1995) one of the keys in helping immigrant students adjust is to help them feel a sense of acceptance and to develop a warm relationship with someone such as a teacher. To facilitate this you should try to learn a few key phrases in the child's native language. Perhaps there are some cognates, or words that have the same meaning and are very close in pronunciation between English and Japanese. Pointing some of these out as a type of recognition game might help your student feel less overwhelmed and begin to learn some English which will help them feel less isolated.
Another method might be for you to learn about the students culture and find some common interests that will facilitate language development and relationship building. For example, baseball is one of the most popular sports both in Japan and in the United States. If your student likes baseball and you are lucky enough to have a paraprofessional either you or your paraprofessional could watch some baseball with the student and you could narrate what the players are doing in English. If this is not possible but the student likes baseball maybe students could play baseball during P.E. or recess to help the student feel less alienated by all the new things around him.

I think the key here is to find something that the student can relate to and that is common to both cultures and use it as a connecting thread to pull him into the class and help him learn. Once you find this common thread and he is able to start feeling like a part of the class rather than an outsider I believe he will not cry as much. For now though in order to promote learning for all students and to protect give him some reprieve perhaps you can create a "reading space" where he can retreat to when he needs a moment to regroup. In this corner you could put maps and books featuring both Georgia and Japan that show geologic features common to both. That way when he is taking a break he can start to make connections to some of the second grade content.
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Jordan Nelms
Jordan Nelms
Reps: 104
Yes!! I love the idea of making them feel accepted and developing a nurturing relationship with the teacher. This is crucial...if the child feels welcome and safe, then he will stop crying because he will know that his teacher has his best interest at heart. Great idea!
  Posted on: October 20, 2014 3:46 am

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Solution 112
Posted June 17, 2014 9:39 pm

Alisha Wesley-Moore
Alisha Wesley-Moore
Reps: 60
The child just left everything he was familiar with to come to a place where he does not understand anyone and no one understands him. He is around strangers and knows no one at the school. His misses his environment where he was comfortable and where he was not the "elephant in the room". I would suggest that you definitely talk with the counselor. In the best interest of the child, a tutor to help him with English or translator should be provided since no one at the school speaks Japanese. A translator may also be able to help the child feel more comfortable since he or she would be speaking Japanese. So meet with administration and the child's parents about this matter. Since he can not speak English, he may not understand English, so until a solution can be found, you may need to have one on one as much as possible and create different activities to keep him at ease. Find out about the Japanese culture (especially the different activities) and possibly provide him with some. This could be a temporary solution until an agreement is made about a translator or tutor.
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NyVyTy
NyVyTy
Reps: 90
You make some great points. I agree that there should be a meeting between the counselors, teacher, and parents of the student. I also think that an ESL teacher should become involved in this matter so that differentiated instruction strategies may be given to make the student feel more welcomed.
  Posted on: October 3, 2014 6:09 pm

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Solution 113
Posted October 7, 2014 7:37 pm

BazaNu
BazaNu
Reps: 89
I am sure this student feels totally isolated, having no one at all to talk to while he is at school. Whereas, at his old school this boy had friends and others he could relate to. Additionally, there are bound to be some cultural differences. Combined, I am sure this young student is overwhelmed. I would do what I could to make this student feel welcome. Smiles and nods of encouragement will help. Ensure the other students understand what this boy is probably experiencing so that they can include him in games or group assignments. He also needs someone at the school who can speak Japanese to communicate with and begin teaching him English.
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Solution 114
Posted October 3, 2014 6:06 pm

NyVyTy
NyVyTy
Reps: 90
It could be truly possible that the student simply has not adjusted to the US yet, and misses his home and friends in Japan. I would encourage you to use an English-Japanese/Japanese-English translator, which can be found online to ask the student what is bothering him. If this does not work, allow the student to draw a picture as a representation of what is wrong with him. Afterwards, allow the student to share some of his cultural background with the class, and allow the class to share some of their cultural experiences from the US. In this manner, the students will become more comfortable with the new student, and he will also feel more comfortable with the class. Allow the students to work in small groups for a while, and rotate the groups out so that the new student can mix and mingle with other members of the class. Hopefully, he'll become so engaged, that he won't cry anymore.
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PyveDu
PyveDu
Reps: 101

I think a translator will also be handy for this child to be able to start communicating with others in his language while he is adjusting to America. I think as a teacher we need to build our relationships by really focusing on the child and where they come from. I think this is awesome that you say to share pictures and other things from his old home with the class. I also stated it would be good to FaceTIme or have pen pals with his school.
  Posted on: October 9, 2014 8:34 pm

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Solution 115
Posted October 6, 2014 4:10 pm

ezasyp
ezasyp
Reps: 107
I feel like this student is crying for a number of different reasons. To start with he does not understand what anyone in his classroom is saying. To this student everyone is speaking words and he has no idea what is going on. He probably does not even feel like he can communicate his issues (even down to having to use the bathroom) because of the language barrier. If I was in this situation I would sit down with the ESOL teacher at the school if there is one to develop a plan to help this student. I would then print up some basic translations for the student so he can use that guide to not feel so lost with communicating. As a teacher I would also try to learn some basic phrases so I could at least say good morning, how are you, do you need anything, etc. I think I would even take a day and have my students learn these phrases as well. I would try to make the student feel as comfortable and safe as I could. By creating an environment that shows the student we want to get to know him, I think he will slowly become comfortable in the situation. It is important to keep in mind the situation at hand and just what this student has gone through with the move from Japan.
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yXeBeX
yXeBeX
Reps: 114
I agree that accommodations need to be made to make sure this student has someone to talk to which will make him a feel a bit more comfortable. If a student with an IEP was new to the classroom, they would immediately be given the appropriate accommodations to ensure their success. This student should be granted them as well.
  Posted on: October 12, 2014 8:32 pm

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Solution 116
Posted October 7, 2014 8:31 pm

SaSyXu
SaSyXu
Reps: 105
I think the real reason your student is crying is because he feels like an outsider. He has moved thousands of miles away from his home, his friends, and probably some of his family. He might just like having someone to talk to about it. You could spend some time having students write letters and he could write a letter to his family in Japan.
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aheduX
aheduX
Reps: 112
This is a great idea. Maybe his friends could become pin pals with the class and the students could use their culture pf Japan for learning experiences as well. This would make the new student feel important and special.
  Posted on: October 20, 2014 2:07 am

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Solution 117
Posted October 12, 2014 10:20 pm

ePeHyM
ePeHyM
Reps: 105
The first thing you should do is take note of when he cries. Does he cry during playtime, during lunch or during a lesson? This could help you better pinpoint why he is crying. He could be crying for a number of reasons. He could be frustrated because he doesn't understand the lesson, because his misses his friends, because he wants to fit in with his peers, because he can't communicate with other in the class and they can't communicate with him.
This would be a great opportunity to teach the other students in your classroom about compassion. Your students can make him feel accepted or rejected. Let them have a discussion about how they would feel if they left their home and friends and moved somewhere else. During the discussion ask them to come up with things that they could say and do to make the young boy feel welcomed. You could then get his parents to translate the phrase into Japanese and teach the class. Once he has become comfortable with the class you can assign him a buddy. Also one he gets more comfortable with the class he can teach some phrases in Japanese.
It is also important not to make the young boy feel bad when he cries and that the other students know that it is okay to get upset sometimes.
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Jordan Nelms
Jordan Nelms
Reps: 104
Great idea to take note of when he cries! I didn't think of that....maybe there is a trend, or he only cries at certain times of the day. If this could be figured out, maybe he could find a way to prevent the problem. Great idea!!
  Posted on: October 20, 2014 3:42 am

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Solution 118
Posted October 13, 2014 2:56 am

aheduX
aheduX
Reps: 112
The boy could be crying because he is in a unknown setting and cannot communicate well with anyone. He may feel lost. Parent involvement would be very vital in this situation. I would speak with them about ways or techniques that I can implement in the classroom to help their child learn and feel more comfortable. Trying to tie the child's home, Japan, into lessons might help him feel more confident and special. The other students might take a little more time with him and help him and console him.


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GyJeWy
GyJeWy
Reps: 105
I like the idea of tying in Japan into the lessons!
  Posted on: October 19, 2014 3:00 pm

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Solution 119
Posted October 15, 2014 10:32 pm

aQazuV
aQazuV
Reps: 105
I definitely think this would be a difficult situation to deal with for the student and the teacher. I can't imagine going to a new country where no one else speaks my language. I think the first step is to meet with the parents and a translator if necessary to develop strategies and ideas on how you can help the student in your classroom. I would then do everything possible to make connections with the student and make them feel "at home" in my room. I would bring some of his culture to the classroom by using his language or sharing pictures. I think once you make a personal connection with the child, he might stop the crying. I agree that his crying may be from the culture shock not just because he misses his friends. The student will definitely need to be enrolled in speech and I would go to the administrators for more outside help.
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Solution 120
Posted October 16, 2014 2:53 am

Kayla Mullins
Kayla Mullins
Reps: 89
This is a very hard topic to approach. There could be many factors that influence his crying. It is odd to me that he is in 2nd grade and still crying. I think the best way to handle this is to take time to get to know the student. Sit with him at lunch, talk with him during recess, or work with him independently. All of these things will provide a comforting factor to the situation. I would also discuss this issue with the class. Make them aware and teach them ways to help the student open up to the class. Usually if the other students feel involved and needed they enjoy helping. This student is learning a new culture and needs to slowly be exposed and taught about the new culture.
-Kayla Mullins
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Solution 121
Posted October 16, 2014 4:14 pm

Myzusy
Myzusy
Reps: 113
The student is clearly going through a culture crisis and as a result he is crying. His tears are due to the loss of his former country, fiends and everyone he knew. His tears are also from fear and frustration due to his inability to understand and communicate in his new country. As his teacher you should make him feel welcome in the class by learning about Japanese culture. One way to do this would be to learn a few words in Japanese such as greetings like "Good morning" and some simple costumes for greeting people equivalent to shaking hands here. That would help break the ice and let the student know that his teacher is happy to have him in the class. Playing music from Japan would be another way to make the classroom environment feel more friendly to the student. Since the student does not know English yet he could communicate through art by drawing pictures in place of writing. To help him make friends I would set up a buddy system in which he had a class mate who would teach him class routines and answer questions. Having a buddy would provide a way for the student to meet new classmates. Another way to meet class mates would be to have a special lunch in the classroom. I would ask the cafeteria when they were serving an Asian style meal like stir fry. When the meal was arranged I would invite the student and a few others to have a special meal in the classroom. Decorate the room with Asian art work, music and other decorative items. Then I would guide the conversation to discussing the customs of Japan. Doing so would generate friendly conversation and encourage the new student to talk about his country. It would also help build friendships with the other students.Using these methods with time and patient acceptance would provide the cultural bridge needed for the student to feel more comfortable at school.
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Ashley Smith
Ashley Smith
Reps: 107
I think your suggestions are ways to help the student deal with the adversities of his life. If the teacher tries to speak the language of the student, they will develop a connection that was not present in the beginning. As a human, the teacher is guaranteed to make mistakes when learning the new word phrases of the second language. The student will see the difficulty that others are experiencing in the situation, which will diminish the sense of loneliness and sadness.
  Posted on: October 19, 2014 7:19 pm

vabehe
vabehe
Reps: 69
I really like the idea of a buddy system to help him adjust to the new classroom culture. I could imagine, just by reading about schools in Japan, that their classrooms are so much different. If the student was partnered with a child who could help them get settled into a routine in the new culture, that would alleviate a lot of stress. I also think it's a great idea to incorporate his culture into the classroom. Even if you couldn't arrange a lunch, ask his parents to come in and have a snack arranged or let them present something special from their culture for the students to enjoy.




  Posted on: June 2, 2015 12:12 am

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Solution 122
Posted October 19, 2014 11:50 am

egyveW
egyveW
Reps: 103
I think that the student may just need more time, but I would also make sure that the counselor is informed of this behavior. It is normal for a child to miss friends and even have difficulty adapting to a very new environment, but if the student is crying every day without fail, it needs to be reported because it may run deeper than simply having to adjust to a new environment. I think that trying to incorporate the student's culture into any lesson would be a great idea to help the student feel more at home. At that point, connection with the student is key, no matter how small that connection might be.
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Ashley Smith
Ashley Smith
Reps: 107
I made a similar suggestion of consulting the counselor about the situation. Other coping strategies may be developed to help the students adjust to the changes that have been thrown into his life by moving to a different country. I believe the crying is attributed to the shock that he is experiencing in an unfamiliar place with new cultural expectations. While there may be other unseen reasons that the student is releasing these emotions in such a candid manner, I propose that the teacher learn some friendly phrases of the language that the student is fluent in to help the student feel more comfortable and accepted in the educational setting.
  Posted on: October 19, 2014 7:26 pm

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Solution 123
Posted October 19, 2014 1:32 pm

Qureby
Qureby
Reps: 102
I would imagine that he is crying because he has been placed in an unfamiliar situation and cannot navigate the new experiences because he cannot communicate. I would probably start by looking for a computer program or iPad app that can help with translations. I would also contact the district office and see if there is someone in the district who speaks Japanese who might be able to come to the school at least for one day. If that fails I would start reaching out to the community to try and locate other Japanese immigrant families. Then I would pair him up with one of the most understanding and patient students in the class. This would give him a sort of support system and the student he is paired with may even learn some Japanese.
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Ashley Lawrence
Ashley Lawrence
Reps: 70
I like your idea of a computer program! I haven't thought of something like that. With technology today, surely there is so much that can be used for communication.
  Posted on: June 1, 2015 4:31 pm

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Solution 124
Posted October 19, 2014 2:57 pm

GyJeWy
GyJeWy
Reps: 105
Maybe if he could get a translater or the other students get one to learn to commmunicate with him until he learns English. There are websites that are available to translate. Also, putting one word a day from the Janpanese language on the board for the class to learn each day may make him feel welcome.
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Solution 125
Posted October 19, 2014 11:53 pm

LeHyZa
LeHyZa
Reps: 107
I can imagine this has become a distraction for the class and a very uncomfortable experience for the new student. It is important to get to the route of this student's sadness so that he can begin to adjust to his new setting, learn, and make new friends. I suggest reaching out to the parents once more to see if they can gather any further information for their child other than he misses his friends from Japan. If the student won't open up to you, perhaps you can also have one or two students who you trust and think are kind befriend the student. Assign them together in group assignments to form a natural bond. A classroom activity using a translator app may be a way to initiate conversation between the new student and the class. It may just be time that the student needs to adjust as he is young and obviously very uncomfortable.
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Solution 126
Posted October 20, 2014 1:10 am

Whitney Johnson
Whitney Johnson
Reps: 97
My solution to this issue is to have a conference with the child's parents and present two solutions. The first solution is that the child be paired with another student in the classroom, designating them as "buddies" to help him get through the day. This will also allow him to have someone his own age to talk to instead of referring back to an adult. My other solution is to get him involved in a migrant children's program. This will help give him an outlet of comfort after the hours of school. Hopefully, this will also help him cope with his new surrounding. Both of these techniques can occur in order to help this young student adapt to his new world.
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Solution 127
Posted October 20, 2014 2:55 am

Kim Lucas
Kim Lucas
Reps: 107
I am sure that not only does he miss his friends and family in Japan, but also everything else that was familiar to him, food, smells, home, toys, and being able to actually communicate with people other than his family who are not available during the day! Poor boy!! One way that might make him feel as though you are understanding where he is coming from would be to research Japanese words for basic daily activities and things within your classroom and environment. Just like we do in Pre-school and kindergarten when we are teaching students to read beginning words, label items in the classroom with both the Japanese words and the English words. Others in the class will benefit from this as well! Although you can not spend every minute of the day teaching one student, maybe he could stay right next to you and you could comfort him until he begins to feel more comfortable.
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Solution 128
Posted October 20, 2014 3:41 am

Jordan Nelms
Jordan Nelms
Reps: 104
Poor little guy!! I'm sure he is crying for many reasons...he probably does miss his friends in Japan but he is also probably scared to death. He doesn't know anyone here and does not speak the language at all :( My first step would probably to try to find a translator as soon as possible, although Google Translate may not be 100% accurate, it could be a good start. Once I knew that he was able to understand something I was saying, I would just reassure him that he was safe and was going to be okay. I would also allow him to bring something with him that makes him feel comfortable. If these strategies didn't begin to help, I would seek the help of my school counselor or allow him to go to the school counselor's office to give him some time to calm down. I would also try to get a student from the class to try to become his friend to make him feel more comfortable. This is a tough situation.
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Solution 129
Posted October 27, 2014 6:54 am

HyraLe
HyraLe
Reps: 73
This is a hard situation to be in because I know that as a caring educator you care about him but you are having a hard time comforting him because of the communication issue. If there is no translator, you should get with the school counselor to come up with and develop some ideas to break that barrier and make him feel at home. Learn some basic things in his language so that some communication can be done with him because I'm sure he feels so sad and lonely crying but no one can understand him at all. By learning some of his language I'm sure this will help him not to feel so lonely.
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Solution 130
Posted February 19, 2015 5:31 pm

uHugyT
uHugyT
Reps: 100
It's important to make the new student feel welcome and at home. It would probably be helpful to allow the student to bring in an item from home that he associates with comfort like a stuffed animal. It would also be nice to have a featured Japanese word of the week. It would spark the other students' interest in the new student's culture and get him to interact more with other students.
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Solution 131
Posted March 2, 2015 3:30 am

Breanna Bunnell
Breanna Bunnell
Reps: 201
It must be an extremely scary new environment for this child. I think that it would be a great idea to introduce to the class items and traditions that are celebrated in Japan, or a big part of Japanese culture. He would love to come in to school and see something (for once) familiar to him. Another recommendation would be to give him his space. He is not going to feel comfortable for a couple of weeks to try to even speak a word of English. Let him know (by gestures, body language, facial expressions) that he can speak when he is ready, and that he can take his time. For the time being, he is taking in so much around him, and gaining so much new information, that he might just need to be left to do his own thing (while being monitored) until he picks up a little bit on the English language.
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Solution 132
Posted March 13, 2015 6:59 pm

qaGuqy
qaGuqy
Reps: 129
I agree with all the solutions that have been posted so far. The same problem actually occurred at my school last year. She was also a students from Japan. She cried every day. So I understand where you are coming from. One solution that I suggest is having someone come in and translate for her. We did this here with the little girl. She had one on one counseling with the counselor and translator. She was able to express her thoughts and ideas. We also had to take the time as a school and make her feel welcome. Students are sometimes bothered when their routines have been changed let alone a new environment. Another thing would be to have her write her ideas in Japanese and have someone translate it or simply use Google Translate. This way the student doesn't feel pressured.
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Solution 133
Posted June 1, 2015 1:00 pm

uqeXun
uqeXun
Reps: 69
I think your student cries every day because his world has been flipped upside down. He is in a new country and a new school. He is experiencing a new language and a new culture, and he's being required to participate and function like he would in his native country. I think it would be a great idea to keep open communication with his parents discussing what's going on in the classroom, what your expectations are, and eliciting their support. Find a few peers that will befriend your student and will sit by him in class, at lunch, and play with him at recess. If the crying continues, then I would treat him like you would any other child and ignore the crying (not the child). You can sit him somewhere safe where he can see you. You can smile and make eye contact with him and when he stops crying, give him immediate positive attention. This may be hard to do at times, but I believe it will pay off in the long term and he will become a vital member to your class.
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Ashley Lawrence
Ashley Lawrence
Reps: 70
Your advice is right on. The student is crying because his whole life has changed and his age doesn't allow for full comprehension for that. Making him feel welcome will help him adapt.
  Posted on: June 1, 2015 4:28 pm

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Solution 134
Posted June 1, 2015 4:26 pm

Ashley Lawrence
Ashley Lawrence
Reps: 70
I think he cries because he is scared and alone at this new school in this new country. The first thing you need to do is find a way to communicate with him. Once he feels like someone cares for him, he may be able to remain calm. Let him sit beside your desk or help him find a friend, someone to help take care of him. Once he begins to learn more English, he will be able to communicate his feelings. The great thing about the age group you are teaching is that kids that age love each other. They can help you help him to feel more comfortable.
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yteduM
yteduM
Reps: 77
I agree with this solution. The most important thing for this child is to know that the teacher cares about him and wants to help him. Letting him sit in your lap and offering extra care are exactly what this student needs.
  Posted on: June 5, 2015 4:20 pm

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Solution 135
Posted June 1, 2015 8:11 pm

jamasy
jamasy
Reps: 67
The student could have been pushed very hard by his parents to succeed in school by his parents in the home country. I believe the issue probably lies with both a fear of being punished by his parents if he does not succeed in school at the same level as in the home country and from missing his friends and family he left behind in Japan. The first issue can be addressed in a parent teacher conference by convincing the parents their son will have a steep learning curve in attempting to learn English and get caught up in class. They will need to make their son understand that they understand his difficult situation. I would ask his parents to let him bring items from home that could remind him of his friends and family he left behind while attempting to foster relationships between him and other students in the classroom. He will need to make new friends but that will be challenging until the language barrier is overcome.
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Kalie Walker
Kalie Walker
Reps: 66
I did not think about how the child could have been and feel he is going to be pressured by his parents to do well in school. It got me thinking that he is probably continuously upset because since he does not understand anything he will not succeed and his frightened he will get punished. Your post really got me thinking, great job!
  Posted on: June 2, 2015 2:57 pm

zyzaSy
zyzaSy
Reps: 68
I think it may be challenging to get a parent-teacher conference with the student's parents but it doesn't hurt to try. You also brought up a different perspective I had not considered. It is true that this student may feel up against the world since he can't even understand the teacher. He may also be frustrated and end up crying as a result of this frustration.
  Posted on: June 8, 2015 6:36 am

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Solution 136
Posted June 2, 2015 12:05 am

vabehe
vabehe
Reps: 69
I had a student a few years ago from Japan who was in the US because the family lost everything in the tsunami. He didn't cry, but he was very reclusive. In his case and that of your student, I would say making the child feel safe and comfortable in a completely new setting is key. Akira, my student, was able to have his parents come in and share about their country and home during a multicultural week our school held. They came into our classroom and taught the kids some words in Japanese, brought a traditional treat and also sang a song. At the end of their presentation, they presented every child in my class a small card with their name written in Japanese. It was such a special day for our class and Akira. He was so proud of his country and his family. After that day our class really bonded with him and he became more outgoing and social with the other children. If this is not something you can do in your class, maybe allowing him to bring something familiar to him into the classroom would help him feel more at ease and less alone. Maybe you could choose a child in your class who would be a good friend to him and sit with him and try to help him adjust to his new surroundings.
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Paige Lutes
Paige Lutes
Reps: 64
Allowing the child to present is an AMAZING idea. If the child can't speak English, then that might be difficult! The pride and excitement the child would be cool to watch.
  Posted on: June 2, 2015 3:27 am

Rebecca Ritch
Rebecca Ritch
Reps: 70
Wow, that is an amazing idea to allow for the parents to come in and speak to the children. I love your idea of allowing the young boy to present a card to each child with their name on it that has been written in Japanese. That is a great way to create a special bond between the child and his classmates.
  Posted on: June 7, 2015 11:59 pm

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Solution 137
Posted June 2, 2015 12:40 am

avuNaD
avuNaD
Reps: 36
I can relate to this situation. The same thing happened to me in my first year of teaching. I had student who was from China and had only been in the country for about two months before starting school. He did not speak any English and cried for the entire first week of school. The one thing I can say is that he cried for about 30 minutes in the morning and then he seemed to stop as the day went on. I think that in this particular situation the student is not only missing his friends but having a little bit of cultural shock. It is a lot to come into a new place and not know anyone. I would try letting the student bring some pictures from home or something from home that gives him comfort. This way the student has something he can hold on to or look at. Since the student is young patience is key! Students at a young age are still getting use to school overall and having to come to a place that he does not know and that no one speaks his language on top of still getting adjusted to school is a lot for anyone let alone a 7 year old. I think having something that brings him comfort will help with the crying. When I had the situation my students were able to tune it out and once he got comfortable and saw all the fun we were having he started participating with us. Again the key is patience because the student is young and it is going to take patience on both parts to make the year successful.
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Paige Lutes
Paige Lutes
Reps: 64
Pictures would really help the kid! That's a great idea. That way he feels like the teacher and his peers are welcoming, understanding, and patient with the adjustment.
  Posted on: June 2, 2015 3:24 am

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Solution 138
Posted June 2, 2015 3:11 am

Paige Lutes
Paige Lutes
Reps: 64
Treating this issue with sensitivity is key. Since the kids notice and are aware, I think that it would be helpful if the teacher spoke to her English speaking students about what they could do to make him feel more comfortable. Since the kids are confused, it may be helpful to use this as a learning experience to help broaden their horizons. I would refer him to the counselors if the crying become distracted but I would really encourage to use this time to help other students learn about cultural sensitivity.
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Kalie Walker
Kalie Walker
Reps: 66
I like how you mentioned bringing in the counselors for the crying issue. The other students still need to learn and the distraction from this student may be causing them to stray away from lessons. And you're right, treating this issue with sensitivity is what is important. Allowing the other students to learn about culture sensitivity is a great thing, good post!
  Posted on: June 2, 2015 3:01 pm

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Solution 139
Posted June 2, 2015 12:11 pm

Amanda Morris
Amanda Morris
Reps: 70
This is a hard situation. I do believe he is crying because he is missing his family and friends back in Japan. He could also be crying because he feels lost due to the fact he doesn't understand what is being said and what is going on. I think the first thing I would try is to ask him/his parents to send a picture of something he loves back in Japan. It could be a picture of his family, his friends, his favorite place to go, and so forth. I would have the student place it on his desk so when he feels sad or upset he can look at it and get happy thoughts. I might would even show the class different video clips from Japan to make him feel more welcomed.
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Solution 140
Posted June 2, 2015 2:52 pm

Kaitlin Stringer
Kaitlin Stringer
Reps: 116
The student is probably very upset because he has left his entire world behind and moved somewhere unfamiliar. Moving or changing settings is hard for any child, but changing countries and not speaking the language must be unbearable. Personally, I can't imagine being placed into a situation where I don't speak the language and don't have any friends. I think that the student, teacher, and class as a whole would benefit from some 'team building' activities. These activities incorporate group community and make all students feel like they belong. This would not only benefit the new student, but the rest of the students as well. I think it is also important for this student to feel like his Japanese culture is not being forgotten. Incorporating Japan or Japanese into the lessons somehow might be a great way to help this student feel welcome in the classroom. I have seen teachers label items in their classroom in Spanish vocabulary words. You could easily do this with Japanese words and allow the class to learn some Japanese while this student learns English.
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Solution 141
Posted June 2, 2015 2:54 pm

Kalie Walker
Kalie Walker
Reps: 66
This is a sensitive case and I agree with you that the situation is bigger than the child just missing his friends. I think one of the steps to take would be to make his surroundings feel more like home. I think putting up decorations such as dragons, paper lanterns, pictures of the Japanese culture would be both fun and helpful for the student and his peers. Also, maybe creating a small lesson on the Japanese culture would make the student feel a little more welcome now that his peers know a little about his country. I also think that the school should take further steps in finding a translator for this child so that he can join in on conversations and feel even more welcome.
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Solution 142
Posted June 2, 2015 3:00 pm

Monica Rainwater
Monica Rainwater
Reps: 71
Oh my. There are multiple reasons as to why this 2nd grader from Japan is constantly crying. First of all, he is probably scared, and like his parents said, I'm sure he does miss his friends. This little boy is also experiencing culture shock, and crying is his way to show that he is feeling lost and hurt. Since he cannot use his words to communicate effectively with his teacher yet, he is using his emotions to communicate. It is imperative that I, the teacher, do some research on the Japanese culture, so that I can begin making some connections with this little boy ASAP. I need to find some music, books, or movies that could help him to feel like he is in a safe place, and that I truly care about his well-being. Quite possibly, something of huge importance occurred in Japan, and that is why the family felt they had to leave. I need to find out if they had voluntary migration or involuntary migration. He feels as if he has been thrown to the wolves, and no one understands him.
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aQanaD
aQanaD
Reps: 67
I absolutely agree that the classroom must be made more comfortable. Figuring out how to make him feel welcome in the classroom is key. I like how you said to incorporate things such as music to make the classroom seem more familiar. I can only imagine how this small child feels being in a new country, in a new classroom, unable to understand anyone, without his familiar friends and family!
  Posted on: June 3, 2015 1:18 am

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Solution 143
Posted June 3, 2015 1:13 am

aQanaD
aQanaD
Reps: 67
The student is experiencing emotions due to being uprooted and now separated from the warmth of his parents and friends. Due to the language barrier, I suggest trying to learn some of the language. Be open to attempting to learn some words and even let the child teach you some. This is a way to validate the student and to perhaps calm him down. I would suggest letting the child use art. For instance, ask about the friends. Let the child draw his friends. In addition to letting the child tell you about his friends, I would suggest letting the child bring something from home that would make the school environment feel more like home. It is important to encourage the child to share about life in Japan as he comes used to life in America. This is the essence of acculturation.
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ynyqaz
ynyqaz
Reps: 64
I too think having the child bring something comforting from home would help with his emotions. Learning a little of the language is a wonderful idea. It may be difficult at first but that would definitely show the child and his family the commitment you have for making the child feel comfortable in your classroom
  Posted on: June 5, 2015 5:22 pm

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Solution 144
Posted June 3, 2015 1:18 am

Nicole Turner
Nicole Turner
Reps: 70
This is a difficult situation seeing as the student knows no English. What I would do is to try to familiarize myself with his background. Incorporate little things from his own hometown that would make him feel comfortable again. You could also have him write to his friends back home and have the other students in the classroom write to a student in Japan as well. It could be like starting a pen pal to again comfort the child. It is obvious that he is not comfortable with his surroundings yet, so incorporating his own culture and background would help him adjust a little easier.
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zyzaSy
zyzaSy
Reps: 68
I agree that bringing in elements that remind the student of Japan may help the student feel more comfortable in the classroom. Additionally, I like the idea of a Japanese pen pal. The students could even be assigned secret pen pals and have the pen pal activity be an in class activity to help build that sense of community and acceptance the new student needs.
  Posted on: June 8, 2015 6:40 am

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Solution 145
Posted June 3, 2015 2:47 am

vasere
vasere
Reps: 70
In summary, I would say this student is scared, not necessarily because of anything you or any other student has done to purposefully upset him, but because of where he is in the process of coming to an acculturating in the US. Nearly everything is different for him here than it was in Japan. One of the first things you could do is learn as much as you can about his school in Japan. How does school there work? How do teachers and students interact? Perhaps you can help bridge this gap and make school seem a little more familiar. Also, think about language. I cannot imagine being in a place where I feel am completely incapable of communicating. Help him see that he can communicate, even without words. Give him opportunities to draw or point to pictures. Perhaps this would help him feel less alone and fearful. You could also talk to the guidance counselor or the school's ELL coach.
As for the crying, I am not sure what to do about it distracting the rest of the class. Of course, if possible when this student is not in the class, you could remind the other students to be friendly to him and to remember that he might be a little scared, much like they all are when they go different places. I think you could quietly, as privately as possible, offer for the student to step out of the classroom to blow his nose, or catch his breath whenever he gets upset. Watch how he interacts with others and what seems to make him comfortable. Maybe provide him a special area in the classroom that would be more comfortable for him.
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Solution 146
Posted June 3, 2015 6:19 pm

TyhyMa
TyhyMa
Reps: 84
I do agree with the fact that the issue is probably bigger than him just missing his friends. He is probably dealing with missing his friends of course, but there has to be more. I believe the child is having a hard time coping with the whole situation. He isn't used to everything that is going on around him. The social part of school is probably bothering him. He may not be used to the way American students communicate with one another, and probably feels embarrassed about trying to get involved. He may also not understand some of the lingo Americans use. It is a weird situation as a whole for this child. Everything is probably extremely new, and weird for him as a student. If I were you, I would first try to talk to the child with his parents in a one on one conference. I would try to figure out what is going on and try to make things more comfortable for the child. If this does not work I would probably get the school counselor involved. This way the child could talk to the counselor, but it wouldn't be brought to the other children's attention. This way the child can express his thoughts and concerns once again one on one with someone.
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Solution 147
Posted June 3, 2015 9:08 pm

deTusa
deTusa
Reps: 74

From personal experience, when I was in third grade, we got a new student from Japan that did not speak any English. I volunteered to help him and to assist him when needed. He had a neat handheld computer that translated Chinese to English and vice versa. When he first arrived, he would not speak; he would not try and do anything. I would have to say it’s probably because he was experiencing a culture shock and was very scared, afraid and uncomfortable. I’m sure this is the case with the little girl you are talking about. Not only does she miss her friends, but she does not know the language, she does not know the ways of the culture and she is not comfortable in the classroom. I enjoyed working with the student when I was in third grade and we became friends. He began learning English and how things were done and he opened up more and more as the year went on. It was a struggle for him and he told me it was hard. I felt sorry for him. I could not imagine going through something like that. In this case, I would try my best to make the student feel comfortable, maybe give her a friend to help her learn slowly and see how things are done. Once she is more comfortable, I feel like the rest would begin to follow and she would feel more at ease and maybe not cry as often.
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Solution 148
Posted June 3, 2015 10:13 pm

Tina Joiner
Tina Joiner
Reps: 63
I believe that you have to remind yourself that even though you've gone through the adaptation process of 2nd grade, certain behaviors of that age group would still arise and difficult for a veteran teacher of the upper grades. I personally would find it difficult for me to teach a younger age group than 5th grade because I am more experienced at teaching 10 and 11 year old children than 7 and 8 year old children. I feel that he is crying because he does miss his previous school, friends, and he is experiencing culture shock. He cannot communicate with anyone because he does not speak the language so he communicates by crying. One thing I feel that would help is by finding a Japanese video that he could watch that would be entertaining or Skype through technology with his previous students in Japan. Maybe there is a way to get the class online and communicate that way. I feel that you should try as much as possible to incorporate his Japanese culture into his environment to make him feel more at home and to ease into the transition of your American classroom.
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Solution 149
Posted June 4, 2015 3:42 am

Chris Clark
Chris Clark
Reps: 70
There are many reasons why this student could be crying, all of which involve him being transplanted to an entirely new country and culture. That is not an easy process, and it can be very scary. I think that the most important thing to do is to attempt to bring in some aspects of Japanese culture into the classroom as a sign of respect and validation. If the student is allowed to bring in his own item (for example, a favorite toy or a picture, etc.), then that could be even more helpful. Ultimately, I think it is necessary to have a student-teacher-parent conference as soon as possible. At this conference, you can open the doors of communication, and you can establish procedures for the student to follow if he begins to feel sad. For example, you might create an area in the classroom with some of his personal belongings that he is allowed to go to when he is feeling sad or you might allow him to write in a journal…basically, whatever he feels will make him feel better. Giving him the freedom and space to manage his own emotions, I think, will be beneficial in the long run, and working with him and his parents to create that safe space really sends a message of care and respect. I also think that, through all of this, you should never show frustration or anger, and you should also talk to the students about the same thing. You could even begin to work with the students to learn a few simple phrases in Japanese to build important inclusivity and help him develop new friendships.
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Solution 150
Posted June 4, 2015 4:47 pm

Katy Fitzgibbons
Katy Fitzgibbons
Reps: 71
I think it would be beneficial for the student to have the opportunity to illustrate his feelings. This would allow the teacher to provide documentation that the school counselor may be able to use to gain some insight into why the student is feeling the way that he is. I believe the child is crying due to the 'culture shock' phenomenon described in our text. He has nothing at school that reminds him of who he is. It would be like sticking a fish in a desert; it suffocates the individual. Also, a calm-down corner or safe spot could benefit all of the students as well as the new student since it would minimize distractions for the other students. Moreover, it would provide the new student with protection and a place for emotional release. It may even benefit the new student to have coloring materials in the calm-down corner that he may utilize to express his emotions.
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Solution 151
Posted June 4, 2015 6:52 pm

Sarah Davis
Sarah Davis
Reps: 69
Moving to a new country with a different language and no friends in the second grade has to be difficult and intimidating. I suggest allowing the student to bring pictures of his friends or items from home that comfort him to make the transition smoother. I also suggest finding a translator (iTranslate on iPad, etc.) to help you learn important Japanese words and vice versa for the student. I would also incorporate a mini lesson on Japan, its culture, and language for the entire class. This will help all students have an understanding of the student's culture and language. Lastly, I suggest incorporating Japanese symbols around the room to help the student understand simple routines and directions of the classroom. I believe that this is a great start to help the new student in your class and decrease his crying throughout the day.
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emuZuW
emuZuW
Reps: 69
I like your suggestion of using technology to aid in translation for us educators. I didn't think about that... even though I like to sometimes write something into Google and translate it for my bilingual friends I didn't think to simply do this in the classroom. I agree that making yourself knowledgeable makes one more approachable to ELL students, it also shows that you care.
  Posted on: June 5, 2015 2:09 am

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Solution 152
Posted June 4, 2015 10:13 pm

emuZuW
emuZuW
Reps: 69
I think that since these students are a younger age group that a show and tell day would be nice. However, I'd be sure to introduce some of the cultural differences as a class prior to this part of the lesson. Before the new Japanese student presents I'd take time in the days prior to establish what he will bring in and what should be said about the item or items in the case that he needs assistance in explaining his item. I'd also meet/email with his parents a good bit prior so that this is orchestrated perfectly. Also, I'd select a few of my star students to chat with and ask them if they'd include and help him through his school day from here out. He needs these initial people to look to until he builds his confidence enough to make his own friends, effectively communicate, and distract him from feeling like crying in class.
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uzyXuV
uzyXuV
Reps: 208
Those are all great suggestions, there must be a way through technology that this little boy can communicate.
  Posted on: October 18, 2015 1:06 am

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Solution 153
Posted June 4, 2015 11:19 pm

Meagan Cook
Meagan Cook
Reps: 53
I would try my best to have the student communicate with me through an online translator to see if we can get general ideas across to each other. In this transaction, I would ask what is making him sad and what I can do in school to make him happy. I realize this may be limited, but it would show him my concern while also working towards a solution. I would also use it as a time to teach about Japanese culture and some fun things he did in Japan. I would also try and work with the parents on what they feel should be done in the classroom to utilize their understanding of their son and his transition. Lastly, I would keep data on the times he cries to see if it is when I am talking about a specific topic or at a specific time just for more information.
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RuXuqe
RuXuqe
Reps: 67
I think the idea of using an online translator is a good one. Sometimes they can interpret things strangely, but at least the teacher would get the gist of what the student was saying.
  Posted on: June 7, 2015 1:49 pm

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Solution 154
Posted June 5, 2015 3:52 am

Brad McMahon
Brad McMahon
Reps: 71
First, I think there needs to be a conference with the student and his parents. I think it is important for the teacher to be able to introduce him or herself through an interpreter. I am assuming that one or both of the parents speak English and Japanese. The student needs to be able to hear from the teacher in the presence of his parents. The student also needs to be able to hear exactly what the teacher is saying, at least for the initial introduction.

I think it is important to fin some Japanese words to be able to use with him to break the ice. There has to be some common ground from which to build on. Internet translation programs can help the teacher learn some rudimentary language to be able to communicate with the student on a basic level. Is the student ill, does the student need to use the bathroom, etc. These will most likely begin to make the student feel more comfortable and more at home. Hopefully, once the student begins to feel more comfortable, there can be growth from there.
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Solution 155
Posted June 5, 2015 4:18 pm

yteduM
yteduM
Reps: 77
I think that not only is he crying because he misses his friends I think that he is crying because it is an unfamiliar place and no one looks like him or talks like him. I have found that no matter what cultural background a child comes from that love feels the same in all backgrounds. As a teacher I would try to sit the child by me at all times possible, rub his back, pat his back, anything to assure him that you are there for him and care about him. I know that this might take time away from the class but is important to make this child feel comfortable. Another idea would be while you are teaching the class put him at a table with an IPad that has games loaded on it that he can play. Usually all children love games. One of my kindergarten teachers that is now retired volunteers at our school is from Japan. She is still very familiar with their culture. I would invite her to come into my classroom and see if she has any ideas that would help him feel more comfortable. She speaks Japanese also so maybe I could learn a few words from her.
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ynyqaz
ynyqaz
Reps: 64
Inviting someone to visit the classroom from Japan is a great idea. She may be able to shed some light on some of the cultural differences that may be overwhelming. It is definitely in the teachers best interest to deal with the issue as soon as possible so that the child does not use crying as a copping mechanism in the future. I think a classroom peer would be something to try as well. It sounds like the boy needs a friend in the class.
  Posted on: June 5, 2015 5:20 pm

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Solution 156
Posted June 5, 2015 5:16 pm

ynyqaz
ynyqaz
Reps: 64
While i have not faced this dilemma in my years of teaching, it is a real issue that needs to be addressed. I can only imagine the culture shock and possible emotional trauma the young boy has faced upon moving to a new country with no understanding of the new world around him. I would first suggest to his parents to let him bring a comforting item from home. School has obviously not been a comforting environment yet for him and allowing him to bring an item from his culture to the classroom may make him feel more at home. Due to the boy not speaking any English, implementing a vast amount of visuals around the classroom may help him understand day to day routines. I would also strongly suggest that the family and teacher meet with a school counselor with an interpreter of course to help build a positive relationship and hopefully find ways to make the boy more comfortable in his new home. Assigning him a peer buddy may be a good choice as well.
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Misty Coleman
Misty Coleman
Reps: 73
I also feel that there must be an interpreter involved. That will definitely help the boy and his parents feel more comfortable and better understood.Bringing something from is a good idea. A school-home connection is very important. Once he begins to feel comfortable he will be more likely to come out of the silence stage and stop crying. Relating to the visuals, maybe make him a daily schedule with pictures so he knows what to expect throughout the day. I also suggested in another response to label things in the classroom in English and Japanese to help him see the differences.
  Posted on: June 6, 2015 10:40 pm

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Solution 157
Posted June 5, 2015 5:42 pm

HyZery
HyZery
Reps: 70
I have seen other immigrant students with this problem. Fortunately, we have someone who spoke the language of the students and they were able to get to the root of the problem. I think that such a huge transition is difficult when a student speaks some of the new language, but if a student does not know any new phrases or cultural norms, it makes it so much harder! I think that I would first get to know some phrases of Japanese..."Hello" "How are you today?" "I am glad to see you." "Do you want something to eat/drink?" ...Just enough to let the child know that you care enough to try to communicate in his native tongue. This will perhaps make him feel welcome into this new environment. Perhaps even the other students could learn a few phrases...especially "Let's play." Knowing that you are welcome and belong to a community is a comforting feeling for most people especially children.
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Misty Coleman
Misty Coleman
Reps: 73
That is a great idea! Maybe a class lesson on some phrases in Japanese. Eventually the child may feel comfortable enough to teach the students more of his language. This would help him build relationships and communication skills. You could also label things in the class with the English word and the Japanese word so that he can see the difference.
  Posted on: June 5, 2015 9:13 pm

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Solution 158
Posted June 5, 2015 9:11 pm

Misty Coleman
Misty Coleman
Reps: 73
Let him pick his own seat. Allow him to write letters to his friends back in Japan. Allow him to talk about his friends, draw pictures, write about them. Bring in some things from his culture or allow him to. Someone needs to be contacted that can speak the language so that he has someone to open up to. Maybe some time with the guidance counselor so that he is able to have some one on one time with an adult. Once he starts to open up, allow him to pick someone to share his drawings or writings with. It is going to take time, but it is important not to rush him or make him feel rushed in the process.
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Beth Jackson
Beth Jackson
Reps: 71
The first thought I had was to incorporate his friend into his work, such as allowing him to write letters to his friend during free writing time. This is a great idea because it shows that he isn't being forced to forget about the life he had in Japan. He is encourage to continue interactions with his friend, which might make him look forward to this time during the day. Perhaps it could be used as a reward in a way to try and eliminate or reduce the amount of time spend crying in the classroom.
  Posted on: June 6, 2015 6:49 pm

Melissa Aspinwall
Melissa Aspinwall
Reps: 79
Beth I thought of the filmstrip activity that Igoa had her student do. I also think this would help this second grader cope with the missing his friends. Over time the student could turn it into a movie through the use of technology and share it when he/she felt comfortable. It is so important for us to remember all the change including the language barriers that these children have to deal with when moving from one country to another.
  Posted on: June 7, 2015 1:55 am

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