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Posted on October 18, 2014 11:56 pm
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uZaSav
uZaSav
Reps: 96
Lots of Questions!
After explaining an assignment and putting directions on the SmartBoard for reference, one student in Ms. Smith's class will continue to ask clarifying questions about the assignment. These questions are addressed during the original directions and within the directions on the SmartBoard, and are asked several times within the same class period. Ms. Smith will answer the student's question, and will refer the student to the SmartBoard, where the directions are, should the student have another question, but the student will continue to ask the same question, or similar questions (all that can be answered by looking at the SmartBoard), throughout class. Sometimes, she spends so much time asking questions that she hardly starts an assignment before class ends.

This not only occurs in Ms. Smith's class, but in the other four core classes, as well. What can Ms. Smith and her other team teachers do to ensure that the student sits down and has time to work on the assignment instead of always asking questions?
 
     
     
 
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Solution 1
Posted October 19, 2014 6:15 pm

ahubeT
ahubeT
Reps: 120
I have had this situation before. I usually would place all directions in a PowerPoint so I could print the slide in larger print for the student to keep at their desk and highlight during the explanation. The student was to write any important details they thought they might forget during the course of the assignment. I would read it over and give approval of the notes taken. I did all this after checking on the student's records for vision and hearing tests. I also placed the student closer to the board and made sure to make eye contact when giving instructions to be sure they were done writing necessary details and were ready to move on.
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Jenna Herberson
Jenna Herberson
Reps: 200
Always keeping the directions displayed is a good option.
  Posted on: February 25, 2018 7:15 am

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Solution 2
Posted October 19, 2014 10:15 pm

Ashley Gladden
Ashley Gladden
Reps: 103
I would also develop a buddy system. Pair the student with another student who can assist the student in their work. As the teacher, you can facilitate and try and keep the student on task. If you tell the student that you are going to start grading their work then that should motivate her to get started on their work a lot quicker.
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Solution 3
Posted October 20, 2014 1:49 am

suNypy
suNypy
Reps: 90
I would tell the student to hold all questions till after the lecture. I know this my seem harsh but asking questions over and over again interrupts the class and distracts other students. Tell the student all questions are answered in the power point and in the lecture and if they have any more questions to wait till the end of class.
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Solution 4
Posted March 16, 2015 12:27 am

ybereD
ybereD
Reps: 104
I find that students ask more questions because they choose not to read their notes or the board. There are many cases where the students know exactly where to look to answer their question; however, they are unmotivated to look it up themselves. Therefore, I take the route of refusing to answer a question that they can answer on their own. I also implement the rule of ask three then me. This seems to cut down on some of the questions as well.
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Solution 5
Posted February 19, 2015 1:45 pm

Javuna
Javuna
Reps: 100
Try using poker talking chips. The student is only allowed a certain amount of chips which means they can only talk a certain amount of times and will use them wisely. If the student chooses not to follow that rule implement your behavior management plan. Also maybe providing a printed handout to the student with the directions highlighted.
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Solution 6
Posted February 17, 2015 1:05 pm

ysaWab
ysaWab
Reps: 104
Give one or two of the students in your class the job of being 'question master.' While the working independently, if students have a question, they may ask the 'question master.' This can help a lot if you're working with small groups and don't want to be interrupted.
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Solution 7
Posted February 21, 2015 6:46 pm

uLuqup
uLuqup
Reps: 100
I would try using the paraphrase method before students are dispersed at the end of the lesson to the independent assignment: Address that student directly, and one or two others as well so they do not feel singled out, and ask them to summarize what their task is. This will ensure that Ms. Smith knows that the child understands all aspects of the assignment--if the child then proceeds to ask questions, Ms. Smith can say "_______, you explained the assignment perfectly earlier. You will be fine. Just try it first, ask a friend if you have trouble, THEN come ask me if you still have a question."
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Solution 8
Posted February 23, 2015 12:06 am

Luvyba
Luvyba
Reps: 104
I would print out the instructions for the student to review while i am explaining the assignment. The student can highlight and take notes to refer back to. If they still have questions I would ask them to write them down. This could help develop their question so they can make sense of it. After seeing it written out, I would tell the student to reread the instructions to see of they can find the answer. This may become a game to them and encourage them to find the answer on their own.
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Solution 9
Posted March 2, 2015 4:07 am

JuMaPa
JuMaPa
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Lots of Answers!
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eRuPeT
eRuPeT
Reps: 103
I find this problem in my higher leveled group. It's almost as if they want special instruction just for them. If it is an assignment I make a model for them to go by, that usually helps a great deal, and then after that I will actually limit their questions. I know this sounds harsh but it makes these students prioritize what they want to ask. I would not try this with a IEP/504 student because of accommodations, but with the higher leveled students telling them that they have 3 questions for the whole class really seems to help.
  Posted on: March 11, 2015 7:37 pm

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