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Posted on September 26, 2012 1:26 pm
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Calina Irion
Calina Irion
Reps: 56
Boy, don’t you ever shower?
It is obvious from the first day of class that one of the students has bad body odor. By the end of the third week, you start to realize that the student as Steve. The other students in the class are going to greater and greater lengths to avoid sitting next to him. They mime choking when he sits in the seat in front of them. Any reference to odor or smell in the classroom is met with snickering. Finally, one day after Steve comes in late and sits next to a student in the front row, he turns to Steve and says, “Boy, don’t you ever shower?” The class breaks up in hysterics. When should I have intervened? How?, What should I say to student? What should I say to others? Should I confront the class with Steve present?
 
     
     
 
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Solution 1
Posted October 2, 2012 2:58 pm

Justin Mortenson
Justin Mortenson
Reps: 108
From the moment you realize the situation, you need to address it. Pulling the student aside at the end of a class to have a brief discussion about the matter privately could help avoid an embarrassing situation in the future. Sometimes schools will have a supply of sample-sized hygiene supplies in which you could lend out to hopefully influence the student to take better care of themselves. If the problem worsens, you will have not only deal with bullying but maybe have to open up dialogue with the parents. Often this is an embarrassing situation for the student, so handling problem promptly and privately will ensure that your class runs smoothly.
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Edward Gibbs
Edward Gibbs
Reps: 100
I found this to be the best solution and I would use this in my classroom.
  Posted on: October 19, 2014 4:17 pm

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Solution 2
Posted October 2, 2012 2:58 pm

NaZyde
NaZyde
Reps: 115
Steve could have personal issues at home that prevent him from showering or keeping up his personal hygiene. This could also be an issue of abuse. The teacher should report this information to the school nurse, who may be able to help Steve understand how to take care of his hygiene. The teacher should also report this issue to the appropriate school personnel in case there is an issue of abuse.
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nydyra
nydyra
Reps: 202
Thinking more deeply about the situation is a better way to solve the problem. It may not be that he just isn't showering. It could be something else, like abuse.
  Posted on: October 17, 2015 8:13 am

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Solution 3
Posted October 2, 2012 2:52 pm

atuLyD
atuLyD
Reps: 111
It is embarrassing for the student to talk about their personal hygiene so I would not talk about a certain student's hygiene in front a group if his peers but in private. I would want to team up with the PE/Health teacher to do a lesson on hygiene to teach the students that it is important have good personal hygiene and the value of it. I would also talk to other teachers to seek their advice on how to approach students with bad hygiene.
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Solution 4
Posted April 18, 2013 7:11 pm

ZeNyJe
ZeNyJe
Reps: 101
I have experienced this problem before and the best thing to do first is to talk with the student and make them aware of their odor. Then, I would contact the parent and let them know that their child is being teased because of his body odor and suggest things that can be done such as bathing regularly. Intervention should have taken place when the students first started making fun of Steve. When talking to him, you should be polite and explain that he should make sure he takes a bath an uses soap every single night so that the other students don't make fun of him. To handle the class, I would punish the ones are really mean to him and have a discussion about keeping mean comments to ourselves,
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erugyn
erugyn
Reps: 100
Great idea. Maybe even have some sort of personal hygiene class.
  Posted on: October 18, 2014 8:44 pm

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Solution 5
Posted October 2, 2012 3:01 pm

GeJese
GeJese
Reps: 116
It is inappropriate for the class to be laughing at Steve. The teacher should remind the students of this. The teacher should speak with Steve privately after class and discuss personal hygiene, maybe refer him to the school nurse. The teacher also needs to talk to the boy in the front row who made that comment, because bullying should not be tolerated in a classroom.
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Solution 6
Posted October 6, 2012 12:20 pm

NeDema
NeDema
Reps: 113
When his body order first came to light, a lesson on health and grooming should of been implemented. You could talk about many grooming issues including but not emphasizing body odor.
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Solution 7
Posted October 2, 2012 3:07 pm

amaJud
amaJud
Reps: 114
I think waiting until the third week of school is too late to intervene with this student. After the first week of school I would create a lesson plan about personal hygiene to the whole class because I do not think the students would single out the student at this point. I also will include hygiene about boys and girls as well as different areas of hygiene so the student does not feel like i am singling him out either. If the hygiene continues to be a problem I will notify the guidance counselor to reach out to the family.
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Solution 8
Posted October 2, 2012 2:52 pm

Ashlyn Eddinger
Ashlyn Eddinger
Reps: 121
It would be a great idea to do a lesson based on personal hygiene. This will allow you to reach out to this child without personally attacking him. Another lesson idea would be to teach about bullying. This would prevent a lot of trouble in the future. If this act continues to go on, I would pull the child aside and talk to him one-on-one to see what is going on.
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Solution 9
Posted October 5, 2012 9:28 pm

David Corrigan
David Corrigan
Reps: 137
I would talk to the class without Steve being present, about appropriate behavior. It is never acceptable to laugh or make fun of other classmates. I would send a note home to all students about the importance of personal hygiene. If this does not solve the problem I would set up a meeting with the student's parents.
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Solution 10
Posted October 12, 2012 5:03 pm

Rachel Ressler
Rachel Ressler
Reps: 121
As difficult as the conversation may be, I would speak to his parents. I would start off by telling them some good things that are going on in school for Steve. Then I would tell them that he may be coming home upset today, and explain what happend in class. I would then ask the parents if they need any help and give them websites or phone numbers for charities that can help to buy things like deoderant or soap with out being too pushy or forward. I would explain that I do not want to see Steve get tormented through out his years of puberty.
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Solution 11
Posted October 13, 2012 5:27 pm

vemybu
vemybu
Reps: 119
I would try to talk to the student one on one. Maybe he is unaware or maybe something more serious is going on (no water at home, abuse, etc.) If you talk to him it may be as simple as "you are now blank years old, it is important to wear deodorant and shower regularly." He does not have to know that you are only talking to him about it. If he thinks that you are talking to each student individually then he will not feel as uncomfortable.
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Solution 12
Posted December 5, 2012 9:02 pm

Kristine Morris
Kristine Morris
Reps: 153
Nowadays, students are very sensitive about their personal appearances to others. I came across this situation a few years ago with the same situation. The problem was that a student was coming to my class directly from P.E. and was doing activities he came to school in. Therefore, that is where the P.E. comes into play. I talked to the teacher to express concern about making sure they change their clothes for health reasons. Students need to understand germs and other stuff that can go around by not taking care of their body. The teachers planned a day in health to express importance in cleanness and taking care of their body to stay healthy and strong.
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Solution 13
Posted December 9, 2012 7:24 pm

Shankeil Tarver
Shankeil Tarver
Reps: 116
The teacher should have intervene as soon as she noticed the smell. She should remind the class of the rules of not picking on others and treating people like they want to be treated. She should meet with the parents and let them know about what is going on so they could resolve it.
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Solution 14
Posted February 25, 2013 6:06 pm

TaHazy
TaHazy
Reps: 115
This is an extremely common issue in middle school and late elementary grades. While it could be an issue of neglect, or an impoverished student, it doesn't necessarily mean anything other than the student is going through puberty and doesn't understand it or know what to do. I would have given a health class to discuss the importance of showering, wearing clean clothes, and especially deodorant. I would see if I could get samples and pamphlets to hand out.

As this situation did happen, I would begin by reprimanding the class and the student who made the comment. It was disrespectful and hurtful. The students need to understand that the classroom is a safe zone and that they need to respect everyone in their class. I would call Steve's parents and let them know of the ongoing issue and of the incident.
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Solution 15
Posted April 18, 2013 6:39 pm

eWaPyH
eWaPyH
Reps: 100
This may sound extreme, but I have observed this in a classroom setting recently. CPS is now doing an investigation on said student. I am going to recommend reporting it immediately. It is a different story if the child comes in once in a while and he smells a little off, but if it is a daily occurrence, it needs to be reported immediately. I shower every day, as do most people. It is because of cleanliness, rather than smell. If there is a child that is not being given that opportunity, they are breeding germs and illness and will spread it to the rest of your class.
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Solution 16
Posted October 2, 2012 2:57 pm

tebyXu
tebyXu
Reps: 114
I would then teach a lesson on hygiene. During this lesson I would offer samples of deodorant and soap. If the problem continued I would contact his parents and approach the subject in a respectful tone.
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Edward Gibbs
Edward Gibbs
Reps: 100
I do not agree with this solution. I can see this only making the taunting of the other students, worsen. They will only just continue to laugh and snicker and you don't know what is going on at home with this student.
  Posted on: October 19, 2014 4:15 pm

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Solution 17
Posted February 16, 2015 10:46 pm

abypaN
abypaN
Reps: 103
It is important to try interventions before there are verbal insults coming from the students. The teacher knew there was a problem from the first day of school and then witnessed students mime choking when the student sat nearby. I would have checked with the guidance counselor to see if there had been any previous documentations of this student having this issue. The guidance counselor might also be aware of any poverty issues going on with the family. If not then I would be the one to address it and use a collaboration of the guidance counselor and the school nurse to help the student understand the consequences of improper hygiene. I would also, before the rude harassment of the other students became verbal, made sure to emphasize my rules against speaking out in class and would remind them of the consequences of breaking that rule. If that student still chose to say that to Steve, then he would have faced those consequences.
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Solution 18
Posted February 19, 2015 6:53 pm

uHugyT
uHugyT
Reps: 100
I would address this situation promptly and privately as soon as I notice that there is an issue. I would rather ask the student about their hygiene which may slightly embarrass, them then have a scenario like you discussed happen.
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Solution 19
Posted February 22, 2015 1:39 am

uLuqup
uLuqup
Reps: 100
I think that talking to the student directly is a good idea. But, I would bring the student down to the nurse's office to do so. I would then ask the nurse to come with us and sit in a comfy area (bean bag chairs in the library, outside on the grass, etc....somewhere where the student can feel relaxed and like he is not being attacked). I would then proceed to discuss the issue with the student with the help of the school nurse. It is possible the nurse can offer the student some personal hygeine products the school has available, letting him choose what he wants, so that he feels like this is not something that he should feel upset about.
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Solution 20
Posted October 4, 2015 3:08 am

uZyvaP
uZyvaP
Reps: 204
I believe you should have intervened as soon as you identified Steve as the child with the problem. I would have immediately referred Steve to the guidance counselor to see what was going on in the home. There is probably financial hardships at home that is causing the student not to bathe. Together with the guidance counselor, I would notify the parents of the problem. There is obviously a neglect issue as well. finally, I would work with the guidance counselor to provide social services for the family.
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Solution 21
Posted October 18, 2015 4:51 pm

tuRemy
tuRemy
Reps: 75
I would have intervened sooner. Speaking directly with the student then with the parents, and most importantly, reporting it to the counselor. This student is obviously suffering from neglect and it needs to be reported.
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Solution 22
Posted February 22, 2016 8:32 pm

Victoria Horn
Victoria Horn
Reps: 201
I would immediately let the student know that is inappropriate. I would remind the students of the classroom rules and say that we treat everyone with respect. I would also say that there will be consequences for those who choose to disrespect others.
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Solution 23
Posted October 14, 2016 9:42 pm

yNubas
yNubas
Reps: 101
I would say that the best solution would be to talk to the student and ask him if he is aware of the body odor. If not I would tell him that there are products out there to get rid of it. If he chooses too. I believe talking to be key when trying to figure out a solution to the problem.
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Solution 24
Posted October 16, 2017 1:52 am

ReLeve
ReLeve
Reps: 103
I think the best and first step is to always contact the parents for a private meeting. Perhaps just address that the child is facing some bullying and try to suggest maybe taking a shower first thing in the morning before school, or something of the nature. Do NOT make it seem like you are attacking or accusing the parents of anything or they will shut down immediately and not listen to anything you have to offer. Perhaps the boy runs around before school and the parents are simply unaware of the problem. This could also be something deeper like abuse or something of the nature, and perhaps then if the problem persists after the conference, it is time to take it to the school's social worker. They are trained in handling cases just like this.
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