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Posted on October 19, 2014 1:01 pm
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ahubeT
ahubeT
Reps: 120
Anxiety Disorder Bringing Disorder
Jan is a new teacher who has a student with an anxiety disorder. The student will have good days and so-so days, but then will have days that are horrible for teacher and student alike. The student is an A student and understands the concepts delivered. The student will sit quietly during classwork and complete assignments independently and not have one question, but on assessment days, the student constantly wants to ask questions and is upset when Jan cannot answer the question and causes a scene that disrupts the other students. Jan cannot possibly answer the student's questions and not expect other students to want their questions answered. Jan has reviewed the student's IEP, and he does not get small group testing, and she has spoken with his case manager who does not think he needs small group testing. Jan has spoken with the other teachers, and the student is in a collaborative or resource setting in all classes except math. How can Jan best serve this student and the other students during testing?
 
     
     
 
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Solution 1
Posted February 13, 2015 7:07 pm

DeJyQy
DeJyQy
Reps: 104
This is a tricky situation but it appears that the IEP team needs to find a way for this student to qualify for small group or individual testing. It is unfair for other students to have this distraction when they are taking their own exam. Trying some relaxation techniques might help this student. Maybe trying some "mock" exam situations with some relation techniques to find out which ones might work would be a good idea.
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Jenna Herberson
Jenna Herberson
Reps: 200
I agree, it is unfair.
  Posted on: February 25, 2018 7:20 am

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Solution 2
Posted February 17, 2015 2:36 pm

sezyQe
sezyQe
Reps: 101
It is apparent that the student needs a small group environment for testing, but since Jan cannot get this to happen immediately, she needs a short term solution so the student will not continue to interrupt other students. I suggest that she discuss with the student before getting into a testing setting that she cannot answer any questions. I think she--and perhaps the guidance counselor--should discuss with the student some ways to combat anxiety during testing. A possible suggestion may be to write her questions down on a separate piece of paper, and taking deep breaths instead of talking or yelling.
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Solution 3
Posted February 18, 2015 4:44 am

uheZeg
uheZeg
Reps: 100
The possibility of small group testing should be reviewed. Another option for a student with test anxiety may be simply to disguise it. If the test is presented simply as a worksheet for the lesson the student may be less likely to panic. Sometimes children with test anxiety are concerned with the time limits. They feel pressured to complete it in a specific time frame which can bring on panic and self doubt. This may be why the student asks so many questions about the information. It may help to either give the student extended time or even not mention a time limit of any kind.
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Solution 4
Posted February 21, 2015 11:22 pm

eqeTys
eqeTys
Reps: 103
Documentation is key here. When it comes time for the IEP to be renewed/reviewed, Jan should present the information from test days and non-test days (or disguised test days) to the IEP group as specific evidence that small-group testing is needed. Another option could be oral tests, depending on the subject matter and availability of the teacher.
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Solution 5
Posted February 23, 2015 5:40 pm

HeraPy
HeraPy
Reps: 100
I would suggest holding a short review before the test begins. Asking all students, especially this child, if they have any questions or concerns. I would let them know what to expect and remind them of testing rules. Sometimes just reminding the students and letting them know what to expect will help ease their anxiety.
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Danielle Brock
Danielle Brock
Reps: 100
awesome suggestion
  Posted on: March 1, 2015 11:14 pm

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Solution 6
Posted February 26, 2015 7:54 pm

BuMynu
BuMynu
Reps: 101
Maybe the teacher should place the student away from other students so it is less distracting, and possibly have another teacher come in to help answer the students questions.
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