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Posted on October 19, 2014 10:23 pm
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yMyTyq
yMyTyq
Reps: 100
Lexile Scores
With the implementation of the new Georgia Milestones Assessment, there has been a push on ELA teachers to increase students' lexile scores. With all of the distractions associated with cell phones and social media sites, students just aren't as interested in reading any more. I require students to read (books in their lexile range) for 10-15 minutes at the start of each class. But how do I assess my students to know if their lexile scores are increasing?
 
     
     
 
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Solution 1
Posted October 19, 2014 11:08 pm

BeSeQa
BeSeQa
Reps: 99
Common Core strongly encourages close reading skills. Regardless of what the student is reading, you should encourage them to submit a one or two sentence summary of the plot or keep post-it chapter notes. Then, have the students submit them for a informal assessment of comprehension skills. Your school should perform a quarterly or semi-quarterly reading inventory such as Scholastic Reading Inventory (SRI). The data from this assessment will provide good information to drive your instruction.
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eQyVuj
eQyVuj
Reps: 200
Great suggestion
  Posted on: March 2, 2015 1:39 am

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Solution 2
Posted October 19, 2014 10:28 pm

aMaDyS
aMaDyS
Reps: 99
Anytime a child reads, whether it is a newspaper article, magazine article, or a flyer posted around school, they are raising their lexile scores. The STAR assessment is the tool that measures a student's increase in reading level. Encouraging students to read the first 10-15 minutes of class is awesome, don't change that. Just encourage them to read more than just books, but to read material that is within their level of interest.
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eQyVuj
eQyVuj
Reps: 200
Yes I agree, allowing the students to have in class time to read is a great idea. Also, having different types of reading material that interest the student is a great idea as well.
  Posted on: March 2, 2015 1:41 am

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Solution 3
Posted March 14, 2015 1:12 pm

yTaSuD
yTaSuD
Reps: 128
The students need to practice summarizing everything that they read. Also, you could either read to the student or give them common readings and give formative assessments to test comprehension and even retention. Involve the students' technology. Allow them to read on a phone or a tablet. Just using technology as a medium is often enough to change interest let.
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Solution 4
Posted October 18, 2015 2:21 pm

SaSyJe
SaSyJe
Reps: 107
Our school has purchased a Scholastic Program. With this program we are able to use the Scholastic Reading Inventory that measures the students' Lexile scores. We then test at the beginning, middle, and end of the school year. I am very fond of the data analysis available through the teacher side of the programs. We also have a program for lower students, Read 180. There are numerous books that the students can read and test on. The test program is called Reading Counts Inventory, and the teacher has access to so much information to monitor the change of Lexile scores.
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