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Posted on October 19, 2014 11:16 pm
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eRazeg
eRazeg
Reps: 77
Ticket out the door
In our school system, we are not required to use a "ticket out the door" in the closing portion of our lesson plans. I am struggling to come up with various forms of tickets out the door. Suggestions?
 
     
     
 
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Solution 1
Posted October 20, 2014 12:03 am

eHuJeW
eHuJeW
Reps: 80
One thing I have used as a ticket out the door has been an example for students to complete or solve. For example, if teaching unit conversion in 5th grade math I would have students independently complete an example of what we learned in class for the day or even have the student write out a quick explanation of how this should be completed. This will give me an idea of the students understanding of the lesson and help to prepare for the following day.
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eQyVuj
eQyVuj
Reps: 200
Excellent suggestion. Great way to end a lesson for the day.
  Posted on: March 2, 2015 1:42 am

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Solution 2
Posted October 20, 2014 12:10 am

Robyn Davis
Robyn Davis
Reps: 85
Students can also do a windshield check that will allow the teacher to informally assess where students are in their learning. The students give a thumbs up for one of the three responses:

- My windshield is clear (I understand the lesson)

- My windshield has bugs (I still have some misconceptions)

- My windshield has mud (I did not understand the lesson)
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Solution 3
Posted October 19, 2014 11:34 pm

HyNusa
HyNusa
Reps: 80
Some TOD's that I use in my room are 3-2-1, answering the EQ, sum it up, think-pair-share, turn and tell a partner, and "while you were out". Google or look on pinterest for Ticket out the Door ideas, I am sure you will come up with some great ideas.
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raWubu
raWubu
Reps: 97
I like this solution, and I also will use pinterest for ideas.
  Posted on: October 20, 2014 1:29 am

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Solution 4
Posted October 19, 2014 11:30 pm

uGeWus
uGeWus
Reps: 86
I use 3-2-1 with partner. If it was a literary text, you could, for example, have the students turn and tell your partner three events from the story, two characters, and the theme.
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Solution 5
Posted October 20, 2014 12:03 am

BeSeQa
BeSeQa
Reps: 99
TOTD can be administered in a variety of ways without being coined exit slips. The purpose of summarizers are to inform you as the teacher with a snapshot of progress or the lack thereof. Using simple stick notes on your desk of a simple question from class or clarification on a topic are all ways to ensure your instructional practices are on target.
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Solution 6
Posted October 16, 2015 1:12 am

Ashley Lewis
Ashley Lewis
Reps: 77
I usually use the hot seat as a closing strategy. I'll put sticky notes under a couple of different chairs. At the end of the lesson, the person with the sticky nots have to answer the question. I have also done relay summary as a closing.
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Solution 7
Posted March 9, 2015 2:26 pm

yPyjeW
yPyjeW
Reps: 104
I teach music, so of course the content of my "tickets" will be different than most. But I love to pass out notecards with an unanswered question regarding improvement. I make a huge stack and about once a week, I ask each student in all six classes to complete an "improvement" card. The question asks "What have I improved upon this week on my guitar"? This is beneficial for both parties, because it allows the student to tell me what they feel they've done well on, as well as gives them personal value for a job well done. I enjoy reading the answers, but more so, it validates the good things that are going on during my rehearsals.
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Solution 8
Posted March 13, 2015 7:25 pm

qaqyvy
qaqyvy
Reps: 135
In lieu of a ticket out the door I have incorporated a quick Kagan strategy for summarizing my lessons. My favorite is "Take-Off" or "Touch-Down." I ask the students a review question from the lesson taught that day or even the previous day. The students then stand up (take-off) if they know it or stay seated/sit back down (touch-down) if they don't. I then call on one of the students standing to answer the question. It is a very quick and easy way to see who retained and/or understood information from that day's lesson or those who did not.
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Solution 9
Posted October 20, 2014 2:56 am

asaSuW
asaSuW
Reps: 73
You can use learning scale check, where students place a sticky note on a scale that relates back to the learning goal for the lesson.
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Solution 10
Posted October 18, 2015 1:18 am

vaWety
vaWety
Reps: 82
One thing I use is a 3-2-1 pyramid. Students draw a triangle and separate it horizontally into 3 sections. In the top sentence they are to write a 1-sentence main idea. In the second section, they write 2 details. In the third section they write 3 interesting facts.
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