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Posted on October 19, 2014 11:19 pm
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eRazeg
eRazeg
Reps: 77
No zeros for no work
In this school system, teachers are not allowed to give students a zero when they do not return work. Some teachers do not agree with this policy. Thoughts?
 
     
     
 
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Solution 1
Posted October 19, 2014 11:27 pm

Victoria Neely
Victoria Neely
Reps: 95
I do not agree with this, especially in the upper grades. Homework is to re-enforce skills taught and with that being said I believe it teaches students responsibility. I do not agree with loading students down with too much homework that it takes away from family and fun time. After all they are just kids, but some homework for practice does give a student responsibility and makes them accountable. If you do not give a grade for the homework the students do not care and therefore will not do it.
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Solution 2
Posted October 19, 2014 11:29 pm

Robyn Davis
Robyn Davis
Reps: 85
My former principal also implemented this same policy for students during her administration.

The positive side to this is that it gives students optimism about passing the course in case they decided they wanted to make an effort to try.

The downside to this is it gives students a false sense of reality. At the middle school level, students were receiving a grade of 50 for work that was not completed. However, that wasn't the case once they reached the high school level.

We saw many students have a difficult time transitioning at the high school level because of this policy.
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raWubu
raWubu
Reps: 97
I agree with this solution. I can see both sides to the policy.
  Posted on: October 20, 2014 1:23 am

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Solution 3
Posted October 20, 2014 3:39 am

azesuz
azesuz
Reps: 63
I disagree with this policy. Students need to know that there are consequences for not doing the work that they are supposed to do. In my opinion, I feel this policy will only hurt students in the future.
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Solution 4
Posted October 19, 2014 11:39 pm

havebu
havebu
Reps: 67
Giving a zero for work not turned in does not reflect the student meeting the standards. The student should not get a zero for not turning in work. Instead, find was to reward students for turning in their work...maybe motivating students more.
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raWubu
raWubu
Reps: 97
I do not agree with this solution. This policy is teaching students to not be responsible.
  Posted on: October 20, 2014 1:23 am

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Solution 5
Posted October 20, 2014 10:59 pm

umyhyT
umyhyT
Reps: 95
On one side of the story, some teachers say that giving students zeros sends them on some sort of "drop out path", that it is hard to recover from getting a zero. To be honest, that does not make any sense to me. For me, zeros were to alert me that I had not completed an assignment and to do better next time around. Zeros did not affect my life so drastically as to make me think that I was not meant for schooling.
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Solution 6
Posted March 2, 2015 4:22 am

vaguPe
vaguPe
Reps: 99
Allow students to further their education based on lack of dedication is a double edged sword. It only reflects upon the school system and what they consider an education.
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Solution 7
Posted March 10, 2015 2:29 am

PejuQe
PejuQe
Reps: 100
I do not agree with the policy. This gives students an out of completing their work and there are no consequences. However, I can see where giving a child a zero isn't an accurate view of whether the student has learned the material, which is what grades are (or should be) intended for.
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Solution 8
Posted March 11, 2015 1:21 am

edyRav
edyRav
Reps: 108
While I do have some issues with this policy, I understand the need for it. In the lower elementary levels, students who are struggling may become very defeated if they see that they grade is below a fifty as they may feel they can't bring it up. At such a young age, I don't think this would be a positive situation for the student.
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Solution 9
Posted March 15, 2015 4:25 pm

Katrina Hammonds
Katrina Hammonds
Reps: 103
One solution that I have found to work with my students is implementing an opportunity room during their socialization time (Lunch, pep rally's, or other school events that do not disrupt instruction). On my team, we have a teacher who host the opportunity room in their class and the other three teachers take the opportunity room teacher's remaining students with their classes. Students are assigned zero's when not turning in assignments, however, they have an opportunity to make the assignment up when they are given their opportunity room pass. Students go to the opportunity room everyday for a week until they complete their assignment. Each teacher on our team can send a maximum of eight students to the opportunity room. We have students sign in/out of the opportunity room as documentation of our willingness to allow them to make-up missing assignments.
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Solution 10
Posted October 11, 2015 5:36 am

deRudu
deRudu
Reps: 82
My school system has this same policy in place. I agree on one hand, but it is essentially dishonest for me to give a grade of 50 when NOTHING was turned in. My way around that-the student has to sit in silent lunch and complete the assignment. If that doesn't work, students with missing work are not allowed to attend our team incentive days that happen twice a quarter. That sure motivate them to turn in work.
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Solution 11
Posted October 17, 2015 11:27 pm

Ashley Lewis
Ashley Lewis
Reps: 77
It's the same way in the school system that I teach in. I do not agree with this because I give homework on Monday and it is due on Friday. I teach science so we only have to give one homework assignment. It's not fair to the students who completes their homework.
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