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Posted on October 20, 2014 12:00 am
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uGeWus
uGeWus
Reps: 86
Quantity or Quality?
In my classroom, my students are required to complete written responses in our reading and language that are typically integrated with social studies and science topics. These responses ask students to create a response using higher levels of thinking based on Bloom's Taxonomy. The assignment I will mention states:
"How did John Brown's beliefs and ideals impact his actions?"

One student, we will call him Student A, responds in great length and truly explains his thinking and uses specific examples that we have read about in our social studies texts, our read-alouds, and our guided reading text. I can really get a grasp on this student's understanding of the topic through his thorough response. Student B responds in one sentence. I can gauge his understanding through his response, but it just seems to lack in comparison to Student A's response.

Which should have the better grade? I honestly think the quality and quantity is better in Student A's response, but Student B did actually answer the question, but very poorly.

 
     
     
 
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Solution 1
Posted October 20, 2014 12:11 am

eHuJeW
eHuJeW
Reps: 80
If the question is still answered correctly I would say both students should receive the same grade, unless you can provide bonus points for the one student going above the required answer by providing more details. A suggestion would be to provide a rubric for any future responses which may help Student B learn to provide more in depth responses.
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unuhaj
unuhaj
Reps: 102
Good insight. Thanks for your input.
  Posted on: March 13, 2015 2:20 pm

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Solution 2
Posted October 20, 2014 12:14 am

BeSeQa
BeSeQa
Reps: 99
In the modern classrooms, there are levels of learning and skills. Teachers should be aware of the skill levels. I will suggest to this teacher to create a rubric that explicitly state how and why to answer the questions. Also, teachers can offer their students a wealth of knowledge by modeling the written strategy or response for the desired product. I teach my students to write in paragraphs. For example, students state their claim, then provide evidence from the text, and finally elaborate with an explanation. This modeling strategy has breathed life into the constructed response assignments in my 9-11 grades classes.
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unuhaj
unuhaj
Reps: 102
Good insight. Thanks for your input.
  Posted on: March 13, 2015 2:20 pm

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Solution 3
Posted October 20, 2014 1:14 am

LynyWa
LynyWa
Reps: 70
Provide rubrics for how students should respond to constructed response questions. The rubric will guide them to do exactly what you expect from them. I agree Student A should have the better grade but provide feedback as to why they didn't receive a better grade and what you are looking for.
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unuhaj
unuhaj
Reps: 102
Good insight. Thanks for your input.
  Posted on: March 13, 2015 2:20 pm

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Solution 4
Posted October 20, 2014 1:07 am

HyNusa
HyNusa
Reps: 80
I would push the student B to try to write more, if that's what I was assessing. I would also use a rubric to grade the writing, so that the students know what is being expected of them.
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Solution 5
Posted October 20, 2014 12:16 am

MeVetu
MeVetu
Reps: 81
This really depends on what one is trying to measure. First you must ask yourself if you are trying to assess the student's knowledge of Brown's decision to raid Harper's Ferry or the student's ability to write a meaningful response. On the other hand, if both are what you are trying to accomplish, I would create a rubric or student checklist and include both the information about the topic, and the expectations for the constructed response.
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unuhaj
unuhaj
Reps: 102
Good insight. Thanks for your input.
  Posted on: March 13, 2015 2:20 pm

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Solution 6
Posted March 11, 2015 2:48 pm

ynusuM
ynusuM
Reps: 103
Have a rubric ready before you give the students the question and let them know how you will grade the question. If you want more detail, let them know beforehand so they can do as student A did. If you don't let them know what to expect before the assessment, it is hard to compare answers.
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Solution 7
Posted October 12, 2016 7:53 pm

jaDehy
jaDehy
Reps: 200
I believe that both of the students should receive the same grade, probably a B each because student A didn't fully answer it and Student B didn't elaborate. I would write comments on both saying "Please sate your answer clearly" on student A's paper and "Elaborate more" on student B's paper. If you do not see improvements then give both students a lower grade next time.
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Solution 8
Posted February 19, 2015 5:17 pm

SeguHu
SeguHu
Reps: 96
Based on the question given, I am assuming this is a intermediate grade level. Student A would benefit from revising and editing. Discuss what in his response is unnecessary and what is not. Maybe you can use a main idea and supporting details organizer.
Student B would benefit from a similar graphic organizer. This would help him spread his ideas out and think more deeply and expand on his ideas, especially because that is seen as an unexceptionable response for intermediate grades and higher order thinking questions.
I would also suggest collaborative pairing. They could both probably help each other very much.
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unuhaj
unuhaj
Reps: 102
Good insight. Thanks for your input.
  Posted on: March 13, 2015 2:20 pm

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Please read response(s) below (if any) before posting your solution.