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Posted on October 20, 2014 1:25 am
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Whitney
Whitney
Reps: 89
What co-teaching?
Mary's Sp.Ed. co-teacher never makes modifications for her language arts students when that period comes to her. Mary has been to the Sp.Ed. co-teacher to specifically ask for help for making modifications for her special needs students. When emailing the Sp.Ed. co-teacher the lesson plan for the upcoming week, Mary specifically asked the co-teacher what days she would like to teach. Instead of helping Mary out with the "co-teaching" and modifications, the Sp.Ed. co-teacher only points out mistakes that Mary has made on the lesson plan. When the co-teacher has been in Mary's room, she offers no help with the teaching for instruction and only helps one particular group during differentiated group activities. Mary has been to her administrator and the Sp.Ed. director about the Sp.Ed. co-teacher, and they suggested meeting with the co-teacher on a weekly basis to set up who would teach what and when. Since the Sp.Ed. co-teacher has not made any efforts to help Mary, what suggestions do you offer Mary to try to get the two teachers on the same page in sharing teaching responsibilities?
 
     
     
 
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Solution 1
Posted October 20, 2014 1:59 am

MeVetu
MeVetu
Reps: 81
I would also ask for an observation. It may be good to have an outside opinion of what is actually happening in the classroom when co-teaching is suppose to occur. Subsequent to the observation, the parties can meet to discuss both the strengths and areas of improvement in the classroom.
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Solution 2
Posted October 20, 2014 1:42 am

Victoria Neely
Victoria Neely
Reps: 95
A meeting with both teachers definitely needs to happen and you can put your name on the parts you will teach and her name on the parts she will teach. When you send them to her tell her you labeled the lesson plans with who is doing what. Make sure your administrator knows of this plan and when you turn in the lesson plans make sure that it is clear who is teaching what, so when the administrator comes in and you are still teaching everything and they look on the lessons and see she is suppose to teach tha part they can ask her why are you not teaching, you are responsible for this part of the teaching. It will make her accountable. I had to do that with a co-teacher a long time along and it worked, she had to answer for it and she did not like it and started doing her share. She was mad, but like I told her we are CO-TEACHING for a reason and I would love you input and help please. It is harsh, but the nice way is not working.
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Solution 3
Posted October 20, 2014 2:17 am

asaSuW
asaSuW
Reps: 73
Before beginning professional learning communities and/or team collaborating, groups norms should be developed; therefore, there would be an agreed method to dealing with individuals who don't contribute to the planning process appropriately. Mary should most definitely have a meeting with the teacher. If nothing changes from the meeting, Mary should speak with administration.
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Solution 4
Posted October 20, 2014 2:12 am

azesuz
azesuz
Reps: 63
A meeting needs to be scheduled with the special education teacher outside of the school setting; maybe over lunch on the weekend or over coffee. Have a calm and relaxed conversation about the issue while getting your point across.
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Solution 5
Posted February 24, 2015 4:01 pm

zyWute
zyWute
Reps: 201
I would ask for the principal or even a district member to come in and assess the teaching strategies. This way it's a non bias review and the problem will be solved much faster than sending emails about the co-teacher.
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Solution 6
Posted March 10, 2015 2:22 am

udapum
udapum
Reps: 101
With co-teaching strategies, one way to ensure that both teachers are delivering instruction is to use parallel teaching. In this method, both teachers are working with different students at the same time, usually in the same classroom. Rather than alternating who is teaching at certain times, this method of co-teaching gives both teachers a clear responsibility and goal throughout the class period. In addition, the students benefit from the use of differentiated instruction. Parallel teaching will require the co-teacher to take more responsibility in the teaching process, rather than just monitoring students during instruction. While a confrontation may be necessary, it may be more beneficial for the students and teachers involved to try a practical approach before creating dissension in the classroom.
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Solution 7
Posted March 11, 2015 4:33 pm

yqureZ
yqureZ
Reps: 103
I think that planning for the week to come would help out. Also, alternating days that the teacher and co-teacher teach would help because both teachers would be involved. This would help put each other in the others' shoes and common ground could be reached.
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Solution 8
Posted March 15, 2015 11:29 pm

aheGeG
aheGeG
Reps: 110
Co-teaching is a difficult task if both teachers are not on the same page. Working with another person and sharing classroom responsibilities can get tricky and resentment can grow quickly. First a candid yet courteous meeting with both co-teachers, administration, and the Sped director should be scheduled. Mary should ask the director to explicitly list their expectations of both co-teachers responsibilities during class time and for planning. If after this Mary's co-teacher is not contributing to the teaching perhaps Mary could ask her Sped director to make unannounced visits to the classroom to observe and read over both teachers lesson plans. If there are still problems, it would be in the best interest of the students to have the problem solved even if reassignment of teachers is necessary.
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