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Posted on October 20, 2014 3:59 am
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mequqy
mequqy
Reps: 87
Writing Numbers and Letters Backwards
Mrs. Allen is a Kindergarten teacher and she notices that a student in her class writes many of his letters and numbers backwards. Mrs. Allen knows (or assumes) what he means on his work, but she fears that this will become a greater concern later in his educational career. Is this a common occurrence, or should she be concerned?
 
     
     
 
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Solution 1
Posted February 19, 2015 4:52 pm

SeguHu
SeguHu
Reps: 96
I noticed this once with one of the kids I babysit. He was dyslexic. This does not necessarily mean he is also dyslexic, but it is a possibility. She should not worry, but it can be a larger problem in the future if not corrected. Practice tracing letters, letter recognition, and other concepts of print such as reading from left to right.
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Comments posted for this solution

Rezaty
Rezaty
Reps: 102
Thanks for sharing
  Posted on: March 11, 2015 4:25 pm

unuhaj
unuhaj
Reps: 102
Good insight. Thanks for your input.
  Posted on: March 13, 2015 2:09 pm

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Solution 2
Posted October 20, 2014 10:42 pm

umyhyT
umyhyT
Reps: 95
I think it would be good for Mrs. Allen to hold her concern, but just keep an eye on the student's progress. Also she should notify the student's parents so they may be aware of the situation in order to further keep an eye on how their child performs.
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Comments posted for this solution

yvesyv
yvesyv
Reps: 37
Writing letters backward is a major concern that could indicate a disability. This should be relayed to parents immediately and the teacher should keep documentation.
  Posted on: October 22, 2014 1:09 pm

Rezaty
Rezaty
Reps: 102
Thanks for sharing
  Posted on: March 11, 2015 4:25 pm

unuhaj
unuhaj
Reps: 102
Good insight. Thanks for your input.
  Posted on: March 13, 2015 2:10 pm

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Solution 3
Posted March 10, 2015 1:25 pm

Getube
Getube
Reps: 104
When I taught pre-k, I found it to be quite common for my students to write letters and numbers backwards, especially if they were left handed. I made copies of the alphabet and numbers for them to trace, I laminated them so that they could use them over and over. I think it is just something that needs to be practiced and seen repetitively.
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Comments posted for this solution

Rezaty
Rezaty
Reps: 102
Thanks for sharing
  Posted on: March 11, 2015 4:26 pm

unuhaj
unuhaj
Reps: 102
Good insight. Thanks for your input.
  Posted on: March 13, 2015 2:10 pm

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Solution 4
Posted March 1, 2015 5:21 am

dubaNu
dubaNu
Reps: 190
I think that Mrs. Allen should immediately talk to the child's parents and implement a plan of solutions for the child since this would effect him in his later on educational career.
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Comments posted for this solution

Danielle Brock
Danielle Brock
Reps: 100
This idea would be very logical. I would do the same.
  Posted on: March 1, 2015 10:31 pm

Rezaty
Rezaty
Reps: 102
Thanks for sharing
  Posted on: March 11, 2015 4:25 pm

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Solution 5
Posted March 2, 2015 1:39 am

upyRyX
upyRyX
Reps: 185
One possible solution to this issue could be to give the child a bookmaker and have them cover up the letters/numbers of the word/number so that they can move through it one by one. This could become a greater concern if the issue continues, the parents of the child may consider getting them tested for a possible learning disability.
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Comments posted for this solution

vaguPe
vaguPe
Reps: 99
Great valid points, will keep note.
  Posted on: March 2, 2015 4:41 am

Rezaty
Rezaty
Reps: 102
Thanks for sharing
  Posted on: March 11, 2015 4:25 pm

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Solution 6
Posted March 14, 2015 6:03 pm

PejuQe
PejuQe
Reps: 100
I teach 2nd grade and we currently have a student that is having the same issue in our grade. I am not sure how long this student has been doing this as she was new to our district this year. I would say that more attention should be payed to the errors now to ensure the student can get help later on if/when needed.
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Solution 7
Posted March 9, 2015 1:33 pm

yPyjeW
yPyjeW
Reps: 104
My son had this same problem. We even had him tested for dyslexia. He has no trouble reading or understanding text. He simply could not get his b's and d's correct! We started having him write words beginning with each letter and writing each "b" and "d" in a separate color from the rest of the words. Then he could easily see his mistakes because the colors would be off. It seemed to work well, and didn't seem as a punishment.
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Comments posted for this solution

Rezaty
Rezaty
Reps: 102
Thanks for sharing
  Posted on: March 11, 2015 4:25 pm

unuhaj
unuhaj
Reps: 102
Good insight. Thanks for your input.
  Posted on: March 13, 2015 2:11 pm

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Please read response(s) below (if any) before posting your solution.