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Posted on February 19, 2015 6:09 pm
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uHugyT
uHugyT
Reps: 100
Students with ADHD
What are some classroom management strategies that can be used for students with ADHD? How should you deal with students who have outbursts in the classroom and are distracting other students?
 
     
     
 
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Solution 1
Posted February 21, 2015 2:25 am

aPuhyj
aPuhyj
Reps: 101
One of the areas of difficulty for students with ADHD is attention span, therefore lessons should be brief, and feedback for these students should be immediate (and often). Larger projects should be broken down in to manageable parts for students with ADHD. Students with ADHD tend to have a harder time staying on task as the day progresses, therefore, academics should be scheduled for the morning. Afternoon activities should include activities that allow for more physical activity.

As important as it is to give consequences to students who have outbursts in class, these students must also be provided with an expected, or desired behavior, as part of a behavior intervention.
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Candice Greene
Candice Greene
Reps: 201
This suggestion was helpful, I will try to schedule my days with academics in morning to accommodate students with ADHD.
  Posted on: February 27, 2015 9:11 pm

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Solution 2
Posted February 22, 2015 4:49 pm

ugeBeS
ugeBeS
Reps: 120
One student that I am working with has ADHD and responds very well to positive reinforcement and a reward system. The student has a behavior chart that I fill out for every class period, including both positive and negative behaviors. I record these behaviors and write specific situations down on the chart for his parents to review every night. At the end of each class period, if the student has earned enough positive behavior points (7 in this case), the student is allowed one piece of candy. Although it may seem that candy/sugar will cause the student to become more off task, this reward is very motivating for him and causes him to engage in positive behaviors more often than not.
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Candice Greene
Candice Greene
Reps: 201
This was a helpful suggestion.
  Posted on: February 27, 2015 9:11 pm

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Solution 3
Posted February 23, 2015 4:48 am

HeraPy
HeraPy
Reps: 100
I would be sure to have this student help with things if possible. Have him/her run errands for you or pass out papers to his/her classmates. You have to be sure to not seem like you are favoring this student but they do better feeling needed and staying busy. You can also give this student something to have in their hands that will help them focus and not disrupt the other students.
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Solution 4
Posted February 20, 2015 7:01 pm

aBudyP
aBudyP
Reps: 97
Allowing these students a "chill out" is a good way for them to be responsible and manage their emotions and behaviors. They can do this by removing themself from the class group and into a chill out corner. This would be a corner further away from the group that would have a bean bag and rug space and some books to let the student relax for a brief few minutes. When they feel they can come back and act properly then they do. If they are there more than 10 minutes the teachers needs to talk with them and see what else is going on.
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yPutyX
yPutyX
Reps: 96
I have a son with ADHD and I have home schooled him on the past. You really have to get to know your student and develop a solution that works for them. If they are having outbursts, allow them to express the problem to you, then come up with a solution. If a cool down period is needed. allow them to take it doing an activity they enjoy, then check in with them after a few minutes and ask them if they are ready to join the class. If the problem is another student, you can separate the students and put the child with someone they may get along with better. If the situation is minor enough, they may not need a cool down period, some redirection may do the trick!
  Posted on: February 20, 2015 11:44 pm

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Solution 5
Posted February 24, 2015 2:34 am

araseS
araseS
Reps: 101
If a child in the classroom has ADHD, maybe you could find out if the child has been on medication in the past? A lot of times, the child was on medication, but the parent does not believe they need it or does not like how their child acts on the medication. If the medication is not going to solve or rather, diffuse, the issue, the next step would be to see if there are specific things that make this child act out to get a better idea of the situation.
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eQyVuj
eQyVuj
Reps: 200
great suggestion. I will have to try this in the class I sub in.
  Posted on: March 1, 2015 1:29 am

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Solution 6
Posted March 11, 2015 2:10 pm

ynusuM
ynusuM
Reps: 103
Having a class with ADHD students can be a struggle. No matter what you do, there are going to be days that are difficult for them. I try to have as many hands on opportunities for students like this. I also get them involved with jobs in the classroom that keep them involved as well. Seating them near you where you can give them a slight cue to get back on task is also important.
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Solution 7
Posted October 4, 2015 9:12 pm

Alyssa McGee
Alyssa McGee
Reps: 101
dealing with ADHD also comes with maturity levels of the student. As they get older they learn how to cope and control their outbursts better but to help them do that make sure they have short term goals to reach for and lesson and lecturing should be brief. Find something that they can do with their hands during the lesson. During transitions make sure they have a job to do so they are busy and occupied.
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