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Posted on February 21, 2015 7:29 pm
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uLuqup
uLuqup
Reps: 100
Peanut Allergy
A little boy, let's call him Jeremy, is highly allergic to peanuts. The students in his class know this and the classroom door even has a sign on it that says "no peanut zone." It seems that there have been some issues at lunch with students threatening Jeremy with peanut butter--all playful, but saying things like "look, Jeremy, PEANUT BUTTER!!!" and holding it inches from his face. Is simply talking to the students at fault enough? Should other actions be taken?
 
     
     
 
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Solution 1
Posted February 22, 2015 10:38 pm

Luvyba
Luvyba
Reps: 104
I would have a health lesson on different allergies and the sometimes dangerous allergic reactions. I think it is important to cover some of the most common allergies so that I was not calling "Jeremy" out. This lesson could also be combined with a lesson on respecting other people's needs and space. Besides the peanut allergy, students should understand to respect other people's personal space.
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uJabaz
uJabaz
Reps: 100
Excellent suggestion!
  Posted on: February 26, 2015 8:53 pm

Candice Greene
Candice Greene
Reps: 201
Having a health lesson on the subject is a great idea!
  Posted on: February 27, 2015 8:52 pm

eSyTyt
eSyTyt
Reps: 101
Great suggestion!
  Posted on: October 16, 2015 2:55 am

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Solution 2
Posted February 22, 2015 2:28 am

eqeTys
eqeTys
Reps: 103
Talking to the students at fault isn't enough. It is a good start, but it isn't enough. Depending on how severe the allergy is, the student could die if peanut butter is so much as in the same room as him. Doing a series of class health lessons which include allergies and the severity of them is one option that you could take. Another option is to get an administrator or the school nurse involved.
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uJabaz
uJabaz
Reps: 100
Excellent suggestion!
  Posted on: February 26, 2015 8:53 pm

Candice Greene
Candice Greene
Reps: 201
This is a great suggestion, I also think sending a letter to the parents at home will help.
  Posted on: February 27, 2015 8:52 pm

Danielle Brock
Danielle Brock
Reps: 100
I enjoyed reading this idea.
I will use this in the future for sure
  Posted on: March 1, 2015 11:13 pm

eSyTyt
eSyTyt
Reps: 101
Great suggestion!
  Posted on: October 16, 2015 2:55 am

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Solution 3
Posted February 22, 2015 1:56 am

aHemaV
aHemaV
Reps: 100
Threatening a child with a food allergy knowingly is extremely serious. I feel the students may be doing this because they do not fully understand the implications of this food allergy. The students need to understand that threatening someone with a food allergy is equivalent to threatening to hit them, if not worse.
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Solution 4
Posted February 23, 2015 3:23 am

Angela Avery
Angela Avery
Reps: 202
I would talk to the students first and explain how allergy's work and how some extreme food allergy's can cause death. If the problem continued then there would be serious consequences for the students.
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Solution 5
Posted February 23, 2015 4:41 am

HeraPy
HeraPy
Reps: 100
I would start by having a health lesson on different allergies and the possible reactions. Showing videos would help and also comparing allergies to things we can not change, they are a part of who we are. I would also pull the few students aside and explain that we are all friends and want to protect each other from harmful things. I would not want to make Jeremy uncomfortable by making him the primary focus for the classroom discussion about allergies.
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uJabaz
uJabaz
Reps: 100
Excellent suggestion!
  Posted on: February 26, 2015 8:53 pm

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Solution 6
Posted February 21, 2015 8:11 pm

yjugeM
yjugeM
Reps: 90
There needs to be serious consequences for that. Depending on the severity of the allergy, it could be a matter of his well-being.
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Solution 7
Posted February 26, 2015 9:24 pm

BuMynu
BuMynu
Reps: 101
When I was in elementary school, we had a boy in our class who was allergic to peanuts. During lunch, the students with peanut allergies sat at a certain table, close to friends, but not with them so there were no issues like that. If a student teased with peanut butter, they would be scolded. I think this was effective because it kept the students separate, but the students with peanut allergies were singled out. Maybe something similar could take place?
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Solution 8
Posted February 28, 2015 5:13 pm

yDegyv
yDegyv
Reps: 101
I agree with many of the others. Simply talking to them is not enough. What maybe could be done is to have a short lesson on common allergies, and put an emphasis on the severity if some of these allergies were ignored.
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Solution 9
Posted February 26, 2015 5:22 pm

yGyPaZ
yGyPaZ
Reps: 101
I would talk to the students who are doing it. If it's a severe allergy I would suggest maybe letting Jeremy eat somewhere else like a picnic bench outside with a friend he can choose.
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eQyvyT
eQyvyT
Reps: 102
As a parent, I like your solution of having Jeremy eat somewhere else. It would be ideal to have a lesson on the severity of food allergies, but lets face it, many students simply will not stop the threatening behavior. I would send a letter home to every child's parent in the class. At the end of the day, unless the school can guarantee a peanut free cafeteria, than the student needs to be kept safe from harm.
  Posted on: February 27, 2015 3:12 pm

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Solution 10
Posted February 21, 2015 9:39 pm

Hebehu
Hebehu
Reps: 101
For these students that are teasing him, I would have them spend a lunch period or two eating in a room by themselves. I would then explain to them that this isolation is what this other student feels because of your teasing about a medical condition he canít help. I would then inform them that if the teasing continues this will be their new lunch location.
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uJabaz
uJabaz
Reps: 100
Excellent suggestion!
  Posted on: February 26, 2015 8:54 pm

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Solution 11
Posted February 23, 2015 12:14 am

TeQaqe
TeQaqe
Reps: 100
Threatening a child like that to me is bullying, and I would handle it in the same way, using school policies stance on bullying to determine the course of action to discipline those students.
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Solution 12
Posted March 6, 2015 5:14 pm

ymuZuG
ymuZuG
Reps: 101
I would start by just having a talk with the students about this behavior. I would explain to then the seriousness of a peanut allergy and tell them that it is no appropriate to behave this way. If that did not work and the situation continued I would then seek further help to make sure it stopped happening. Maybe I could talk to the lunch room monitor and make sure the students are being closely watched.
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Solution 13
Posted September 30, 2015 1:41 am

eduruM
eduruM
Reps: 100
It's important for all the students to understand the severity of this allergy. Once they understand the consequences of their actions they may stop. Otherwise, I think the perpetrators should be given consequences which can prevent other students from doing it as well.
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Solution 14
Posted October 3, 2015 8:28 am

reHuSe
reHuSe
Reps: 100
I would have a talk with the students and inform them how serious allergies are and should not be taken lightly. I would also inform them that teasing even playfully about health matters will result in disciplinary action.
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Solution 15
Posted October 4, 2015 7:22 pm

VeHyge
VeHyge
Reps: 229
Growing up and as I still have this problem today with myself. I am highly allergic to peanuts. I think this is a serious issue, that needs to be addressed immediately, as this allergy is severe, and deathly. Having a class discussion and showing visuals about what could happen, but yet being informal with this situation is crucial. Sending home the information that was presented to the kids in class even before showing the class, the students' parents/guardians can understand the safety factor with this child.
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Solution 16
Posted February 26, 2018 1:55 am

LuSaNa
LuSaNa
Reps: 103
I myself have a peanut allergy and have had multiple situations like this. I wished teacher's would talk about the severity of the allergy and explain that it isn't a joke. I believe if the severity of the allergy isn't explained this could lead to the child being singled out or even bullied for something he cannot control.
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Solution 17
Posted July 8, 2018 7:12 pm

Jeanette Jenkins
Jeanette Jenkins
Reps: 103
I would let the students know once again this is not ok and that it can be dangerous. If the students continue, their parents need to notified.
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