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Posted on February 22, 2015 1:46 am
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aHemaV
aHemaV
Reps: 100
Suddenly Uncooperative Student
In one of my classrooms, I have a child with mild Autism. I have known this child for about a year now and I have become accustomed to his habits, but suddenly he has become very frustrated with classroom activities. He becomes frustrated when he cannot get a specific place in line, and he becomes frustrated when he does not win in every activity.

I'm not entirely certain what to do, as the normal punishments we have set up for him have stopped working. We would normally have him sit down for a short time, but now he refuses to stay in place in the chair, sits improperly, and tries to move whenever I am not looking at him.

I feel like I have suddenly lost control with this child and I am wondering what happened/how I can get it back. Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated.
 
     
     
 
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Solution 1
Posted February 22, 2015 4:43 pm

ugeBeS
ugeBeS
Reps: 120
I would sit down with the student and his parents and talk about these new behaviors, trying to understand why he may be acting this way. I would ask the student is he has new interests, or goals that he would like to discuss and work toward. Talk about what has been setting him off and why, as well as what he believes will be helpful for him to get him calm when these behaviors do occur.
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Candice Greene
Candice Greene
Reps: 201
I think this is a good suggestion, maybe his interests and goals have changed.
  Posted on: February 27, 2015 6:49 pm

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Solution 2
Posted February 22, 2015 11:05 pm

uGyLuD
uGyLuD
Reps: 100
I would have a one-on-one with this student and ask him why he feels he acts out this way. Call home and ask if theres any new medicine, etc. Maybe it is time to set new goals and accommodations on his IEP.
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Solution 3
Posted February 22, 2015 2:23 pm

aPuhyj
aPuhyj
Reps: 101
I recommend having a private conversation with the student to find out what is going on. The student needs to understand that you are on his side, and are here to help. Meanwhile, he needs to know that he is violating your rules and expectations, and his help with a solution is greatly needed. There is something causing this behavior, and the longer it is ignored, the worse it will get.
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Candice Greene
Candice Greene
Reps: 201
I this this a good suggestion, but maybe some new forms of punishment and rewards should be made for this student.
  Posted on: February 27, 2015 6:50 pm

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Solution 4
Posted March 12, 2015 6:37 pm

HyseSa
HyseSa
Reps: 100
Talk with the student and the parents. See if there are any changes that have happened at home. I have many children whose parents all of a sudden tell me that one of the parents has been deployed for the last month and then I realize why his or her behavior has changed. Take time to talk with the student as well so he understands you are in his corner and not against him. I had a student with mild Autism last year who would run around the room and tried to run out of the school on multiple occasions the firs two months of the school year. I put him on a separate behavior chart and let him work towards a small goal with something that worked for him. By the end of the year, he was one of my most well-behaved students!
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Solution 5
Posted February 22, 2015 11:17 pm

TeQaqe
TeQaqe
Reps: 100
I would first sit down with the child and go over the classroom procedures and rules. Explain that his behavior is not acceptable. I would then consider setting up a reward system for good behavior, as well as come up with new punishments for when his behavior continues to be troublesome. I would definitely consider getting the parents involved as well.
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eQyVuj
eQyVuj
Reps: 200
Yes I agree with your suggestion.
  Posted on: March 1, 2015 3:43 pm

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