TeacherServer.com
Home | How It Works | Stats
Login | Register
     
 
Topic Go Back
 
     
     
 
Case
Posted on February 22, 2015 10:50 pm
Add to Favorites Add to Favorites

TeQaqe
TeQaqe
Reps: 100
Small Group Issues
I work with a small group of students everyday. These students on their own are not too problematic, but together can be very challenging. Due to my obligations and feelings of my CT, I must keep the group as it is. They are constantly off-task during my instruction, making rude comments to each other, etc. I have tried both offering rewards for good behavior and the appropriate punishments for not behaving (I've done both a phone call home and given a few lunch detentions) What would you suggest to help correct their behavior?
 
     
     
 
Reply Submit a Possible Solution
Please read response(s) below (if any) before posting your solution.
 
     
     
 
Solution 1
Posted February 22, 2015 10:57 pm

Luvyba
Luvyba
Reps: 104
I would have them sit so they are not directly next to each other if possible. Also, perhaps the students feel that group time is a "break" from class time and feel like they can act out. Maybe you could start the group time by explaining to the students that their work is their first priority and it is important that they work hard to finish. Sometimes communicating with the students up front what is expected of them can prevent undesired behavior from occurring.
Votes: +6 / -1 Vote Up This Solution Is Useful   Vote Down This Solution Is Not Useful  

Comments posted for this solution

uJabaz
uJabaz
Reps: 100
Excellent suggestion!
  Posted on: February 26, 2015 8:41 pm

Candice Greene
Candice Greene
Reps: 201
This suggestions seems like it would help, make sure the kids aren't sitting together and that they know they have work to do.
  Posted on: February 27, 2015 6:30 pm

eQyVuj
eQyVuj
Reps: 200
Yes great suggestion. Would be very beneficial in small group activities.
  Posted on: March 1, 2015 12:43 am

Breanna Bunnell
Breanna Bunnell
Reps: 201
This is a great suggestion
  Posted on: March 2, 2015 3:34 am

Breanna Bunnell
Breanna Bunnell
Reps: 201
Great suggestion!
  Posted on: March 2, 2015 3:51 am

Breanna Bunnell
Breanna Bunnell
Reps: 201
Great suggestion.
  Posted on: March 2, 2015 3:51 am

Reply Add a Comment
 
     
     
 
Solution 2
Posted February 23, 2015 4:16 am

HeraPy
HeraPy
Reps: 100
I would be sure not to show my frustration to them. I know that keeping your cool is easier said than done sometimes but is necessary so you do not amplify the situation. I would try talking to the students like they are adults and explaining your purpose for being there. You are trying to help them and not waste anyones time. I would also be sure that your CT has spoken with them so the students understand that you are to be taken seriously and treated with respect. Since you are not their regular teacher they may lack the respect they need.
Votes: +2 / -0 Vote Up This Solution Is Useful   Vote Down This Solution Is Not Useful  

Comments posted for this solution

uJabaz
uJabaz
Reps: 100
Excellent suggestion!
  Posted on: February 26, 2015 8:41 pm

Candice Greene
Candice Greene
Reps: 201
This is a good suggestion, it is important to keep you cool in front of the students.
  Posted on: February 27, 2015 6:30 pm

Reply Add a Comment
 
     
     
 
Solution 3
Posted February 22, 2015 10:59 pm

uGyLuD
uGyLuD
Reps: 100
Is there any possible movement in the group? If possible, I would try to change the group of students you are working with. Maybe it is the group of students in particular.
Votes: +1 / -2 Vote Up This Solution Is Useful   Vote Down This Solution Is Not Useful  

Comments posted for this solution

Candice Greene
Candice Greene
Reps: 201
This suggestion doesn't seem to help because she said that the students couldn't be changed because of the request by her CT.
  Posted on: February 27, 2015 6:31 pm

Breanna Bunnell
Breanna Bunnell
Reps: 201
The group is final.
  Posted on: March 2, 2015 3:51 am

Reply Add a Comment
 
     
     
 
Solution 4
Posted February 23, 2015 1:01 am

Hebehu
Hebehu
Reps: 101
I would explain to the students that you are there to help them and if they are not going to take advantage of your help then you can just sit there. If they donít cooperate then let them do the work by themselves without any help from the group or you.
Votes: +1 / -3 Vote Up This Solution Is Useful   Vote Down This Solution Is Not Useful  

Comments posted for this solution

eQyvyT
eQyvyT
Reps: 102
First, I am wondering what grade level you are working with as this can influence the way that you handle this situation. One strategy that may be helpful is having the students teach each other. You simply facilitate. Giving the students the "teacher" role is very empowering. The other students are assured that they will get a turn and tend to listen so that the others listen when it is their turn. I have used this successfully with a kindergarten class.
  Posted on: February 27, 2015 3:07 pm

Reply Add a Comment
 
     
     
 
Solution 5
Posted March 2, 2015 3:50 am

Breanna Bunnell
Breanna Bunnell
Reps: 201
I would have them sit so that they are not facing each other. Also, keep up with the punishing of bad behavior. Try to call and personally talk to the parents to let them know what is going on. The students may need to be talked to and have reinforcement of the rules in the home as well.
Votes: +0 / -0 Vote Up This Solution Is Useful   Vote Down This Solution Is Not Useful  

Comments posted for this solution

Reply Add a Comment
 
     
     
 
Solution 6
Posted March 10, 2015 12:36 am

qaqeHy
qaqeHy
Reps: 101
I would have a serious heart to heart conference with each of them individually. The talk each time should be serious and encourage the students to be the leader of the group in maturity. I also believe follow up praise to good group behavior should be quick. Students love praise and many, like you said, respond better in a one on one setting. It is harder to deal with them collectively when they are showing these behaviors.
Votes: +0 / -0 Vote Up This Solution Is Useful   Vote Down This Solution Is Not Useful  

Comments posted for this solution

Reply Add a Comment
 
     
     
 
Solution 7
Posted March 12, 2015 6:58 pm

PejuQe
PejuQe
Reps: 100
I would set expectations at the beginning of each session. I would make sure that they are aware of the consequences for not following expectations. I would set some type of incentive up for them to do good over a period of time rather than just one time.
Votes: +0 / -0 Vote Up This Solution Is Useful   Vote Down This Solution Is Not Useful  

Comments posted for this solution

Reply Add a Comment
 
     
     
 
Reply Submit a Possible Solution
Please read response(s) below (if any) before posting your solution.