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Posted on February 24, 2015 6:46 pm
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Victoria Horn
Victoria Horn
Reps: 201
Students talk too much
There is this girl who talks entirely too much throughout the day. I tell her to be quiet, but when she isn't quiet, all she does is talk. I don't know how to approach it, especially because it's annoying. Help!
 
     
     
 
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Solution 1
Posted February 25, 2015 10:03 pm

eQyvyT
eQyvyT
Reps: 102
It would be a good idea to find out what this student may view as an incentive. Perhaps a special job in the classroom such as the student that passes out papers or the line leader could be offered as a reward if she does a better job of keeping quiet. It would be a good idea to have a chart or checklist that the student and teacher could use before and after every lesson throughout the day to keep track of her progress. Finding moments when she is being quiet and approaching her privately to tell her that you are proud of her is also very effective but you want to make sure that the other students do not hear you. If you praise her in fron tof the whole class it can cause backsliding. Good luck!
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Tabitha Tirado
Tabitha Tirado
Reps: 200
I would absolutely use this method as a solution.
  Posted on: February 26, 2015 2:24 pm

uJabaz
uJabaz
Reps: 100
Excellent suggestion!
  Posted on: February 26, 2015 8:33 pm

Candice Greene
Candice Greene
Reps: 201
I think this is a great idea, I would use it my classroom. I think offering the student incentives to be quit during class will definitely work.
  Posted on: February 27, 2015 6:17 pm

Ashley Noe
Ashley Noe
Reps: 99
Incentives work. I agree with this solution.
  Posted on: March 1, 2015 3:23 am

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Solution 2
Posted March 9, 2015 7:48 pm

HyseSa
HyseSa
Reps: 100
Depending on what grade it is, you could use something called a quiet critter. I teach pre-k, but they can be adapted for other grade levels. My quiet critters are just little pom pom balls with eyes on it. I use them especially when the majority of my class is talking out of turn or not listening during whole group activities. If a student is listening and not talking out, I give them a quiet critter. This is incentive enough for them, because then the rest of the students want one too. But I go a little bit further with it and if they have a quiet critter at the end of the activity (if they play with it and are off task it comes back to me)they earn a point on the Class Dojo system.
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uzyXuV
uzyXuV
Reps: 208
I love the quite critter idea, an incentive they can see and hold is great for the little ones.
  Posted on: October 15, 2015 4:13 pm

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Solution 3
Posted October 19, 2015 7:23 pm

yZytaz
yZytaz
Reps: 201
Try having a "stick" system. Whenever she wont stop talking even when you asked her to, move the stick down the chart. It can go from Excellent to warning to no recess then to a phone call home. She needs to know what she is doing is not only wrong but disruptive to the whole class.
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Solution 4
Posted February 26, 2015 5:20 pm

yGyPaZ
yGyPaZ
Reps: 101
If this student is constantly disrupting class, have her write sentences such as "I will not disrupt my class" a certain amount of times. If that does not solve it maybe you could talk to her parents.
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Candice Greene
Candice Greene
Reps: 201
I would not use this in my classroom. When I was younger, I was one of the students who talked to much and I don't think this method is effective.
  Posted on: February 27, 2015 6:15 pm

Ashley Noe
Ashley Noe
Reps: 99
I feel like that would embarrass the student more than it would help them learn their lesson. There are better strategies.
  Posted on: March 1, 2015 3:24 am

uzyXuV
uzyXuV
Reps: 208
Writing sentences doesn't accomplish any goal. I would use positive reinforcement.
  Posted on: October 15, 2015 4:14 pm

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Solution 5
Posted March 2, 2015 3:37 am

Breanna Bunnell
Breanna Bunnell
Reps: 201
Punishment needs to be enforced when she is talking out of turn, and rewards need to be given if she is obedient and minds her business quietly. Consistency is key. She needs to understand that she will be punished each and every time that she is bad, and needs to know that others are pleased with her when she is doing what she is supposed to.
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Solution 6
Posted March 11, 2015 1:26 pm

ynusuM
ynusuM
Reps: 103
Try you best to give her time to talk when it is appropriate (before school, lunch, etc.) Directly to her and give her this attention then. During class time, give her jobs to do that will distract here from talking. The key is to try to win her over on your terms so she doesn't talk on her terms.
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Solution 7
Posted March 12, 2015 1:15 am

eTypaX
eTypaX
Reps: 103
You could divide her day up into increments on an incentive chart. For each time increment, if she controlled her talking she could get a sticker. If she could not control her talking then she would not receive a sticker. The incentive chart could have points attached to it with rewards. So depending on how many stickers she received she could earn a reward. You could even have her help pick the rewards she would like to work towards to earn. This might help motivate her to control her talking.
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Solution 8
Posted March 13, 2015 6:21 pm

ByHuSu
ByHuSu
Reps: 102
This is my first year with older students where talking is really a problem. I have found that my super talkative ones are much more likely to listen to their classmates than me when it comes to not talking ALL the time. I have a three screens on my interactive board... one red, one yellow, and one green. When the noise level is appropriate, I have it on green. If it gets too loud, I turn it to yellow. This indicates they have 2 minutes to get it together. If they don't, or if it is a time where they should not be talking, I have it on red. The red indicates five minutes of silence. Each time someone talks during this time period, the five minute silence starts again. It only takes one or two times of that one child blurting out that he or she stops because he knows his classmates are getting frustrated.
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Solution 9
Posted March 15, 2015 2:58 am

yTenyV
yTenyV
Reps: 104
I have found with my talkers I give then first a non-verbal warning, a second verbal warning, and then the third time I say, "since you chose to keep talking, you choose to sit alone," and then I move the student to a large table off to the side of the room. After a period of good behavior alone-whenever you feel is long enough depending on age, the student can then move back with the group. They will eventually get the point.
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ybereD
ybereD
Reps: 104
I have found that sitting this student down and discussing the classroom rules and procedures works best. I have also experienced great success by writing up a student contract at this time and holding the student accountable when they refuse to uphold their deal on the contract.
  Posted on: March 15, 2015 1:49 pm

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Solution 10
Posted March 15, 2015 2:27 pm

equLyV
equLyV
Reps: 104
For this student, you could allow a few minutes before you start your mini lesson for the class to have free discussion time where they talk to their groups or friends about anything they please. Make sure you tell your students that this is the ONLY time they can speak freely without permission. After the free discussion time, have a cue such as a countdown or clap cue to indicate free discussion time is over and to focus their attention on your for the beginning of your lesson. The clap cue is when I announce "if you can hear me, clap once! If you can hear me, clap twice!" I continue numbering the claps until every student is clapping. This strategy works for my girls' classroom because girls are natural talkers. Allowing them free discussion time at the beginning of class helps students feel independent and once class starts, your talker shouldn't have much to say.
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Solution 11
Posted October 9, 2016 6:03 pm

Chanell Wolski
Chanell Wolski
Reps: 200
give her a job. give her an extra incentive.
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