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Posted on February 26, 2015 8:05 pm
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BuMynu
BuMynu
Reps: 101
Uninvolved Parent
Mrs. Fish has a student in her 1st grade class whose parents have several children and is not involved in any of their school work. Sometimes the child doesn't show up for school and sometimes the student comes to school hungry, tired, or dirty. Mrs. Fish knows that there may be money issues, especially with so many children, but what can she do to help motivate these parents and students?
 
     
     
 
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Solution 1
Posted February 26, 2015 8:50 pm

Dameju
Dameju
Reps: 98
I think it is best for Mrs. Fish to visit the child's home along with a social worker. I suspect there are some major issues happening here beneath the surface (and beneath the poverty even) that need to be addressed. You can not necessarily fix the parents lives so that they will be better parents, but Mrs. Fish should still do everything in her power to fix the child's life.
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eQyVuj
eQyVuj
Reps: 200
Great suggestion. Sounds like a tricky situation but it must be taken care of.
  Posted on: March 1, 2015 4:15 pm

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Solution 2
Posted March 2, 2015 4:19 am

Breanna Bunnell
Breanna Bunnell
Reps: 201
I think that the guidance councelor should be notified, or some action needs to be taken. The child might be in danger at home and need better care. Also, I would offer the child help or somehow tutoring (after class, during lunch, recess, etc.) on her homework. Enforce that the parents sign an agenda each day, or something similar. Try to reach out to the parents, and even show up at the home if nothing else works.
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Solution 3
Posted March 2, 2015 2:24 am

upyRyX
upyRyX
Reps: 185
I would possibly ask to meet with the parents, along with the school guidance councilor. I would also find literature that shows how parent involvement is positive for the students. Before meeting with the parents I would ask the guidance councilor for literature on possible shelters and food banks.
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Solution 4
Posted March 2, 2015 3:52 am

vaguPe
vaguPe
Reps: 99
In order for the students to be motivated something needs to happen to parents. They are guardians of these children yet allow them to come to school dirty? hungry? tired? Teacher's have a responsibility to address this matter to the authority and administration for further actions.
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Solution 5
Posted March 10, 2015 2:21 pm

yPyjeW
yPyjeW
Reps: 104
First and foremost, contacting the counselor and inquiring about the financial issues would be a start. We had an entire family living out of a car this past Christmas season, and none of us knew until the child forgot his coat one day, and the principal dug into the situation. OFten times, parents are embarrassed that they have fallen into hard times and simply don't ask for help. It is our job to make sure students are safe and educated. And that means making sure we do what can be done to keep them fed and warm. Speaking to your counselor about a seasonal fund that could be developed for this purpose would be an idea. We have a specific budget just for needs like this. AT Christmas, we send money to families that we know are in need, but they never have to pay us back. The faculty each puts $20 into the bucket each fall, and that is where we draw the funds from. Noone even knows which families benefit outside of the counseling department.
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Solution 6
Posted March 15, 2015 3:41 pm

yqeSeL
yqeSeL
Reps: 102
I have had a child in this same predicament this year. The child cam to school dirty at times, or wearing shorts and flips flops with the temperature at 55 degrees outside. The child has had lice several times and the parent blamed the school (got ugly). The parent has also shown up dirty, bruised, and nearly unconscious early in the morning upon bringing her child to school. The child has missed more days than he has been at schools this year (pre-k). As a mandated reporter I had to do what was necessary for the safety and well-being of the child. I say look into it further, document everything on a daily basis and discuss the information with your supervisor.
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