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Posted on February 27, 2015 3:42 pm
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eQyvyT
eQyvyT
Reps: 102
Too much Teacher Talk
I am currently in a self-contained class comprised of 15 middle grade students with intellectual disabilities. I am having a difficult time reducing the amount of teacher talk in my lessons. The students have difficulty with reading comprehension so I feel as if I need to explain everything to them. A few of them can work well with a partner but many have limited social skills which make collaborating with a peer challenging. I would love some suggestions as to how I can incorporate more independent and cooperative learning in my lessons so that I do not hate the sound of my own voice at the end of the day.
 
     
     
 
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Solution 1
Posted March 6, 2015 2:55 pm

ymuZuG
ymuZuG
Reps: 101
A good way that you can reduce teacher talk is by changing up the way you do things a little. instead of always explaining everything to the students ask them if there is anyone who can explain what you just said back to you. this will get them talking more and you talking less. If no one wants to raise their hand, you can always use popsicle sticks with the students names on them drawn at random to pick who will have to answer your question. To get the students working together more you can start really small. After you have explained something to the students, ask them to think pair share or to turn and talk with the person next to them. These are both really simple ways to get students talking to each other.
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Solution 2
Posted March 3, 2015 4:28 am

Sapypu
Sapypu
Reps: 95
I would recommend cooperative learning if at all possible. Ask a student to share what they think the story is about, or some other relevant question. Right or wrong, call on another student and ask them. Why do they agree with student A? Why DON'T they agree with student A? If they are not coming to the correct conclusion or answer offer them a helpful clue and then ask them to think about that one. The more class discussions you have versus class LECTURES can help the students warm up. If nothing else, you might want to just take some time out of a lesson to have a good old fashioned "get to know you" activity to try and help the students to connect to each other. It might put you behind a little bit, but it would make up for it if it improved their communication skills.
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Solution 3
Posted March 15, 2015 5:38 pm

ByHuSu
ByHuSu
Reps: 102
I would agree with incorporating more technology. I use sites like Educreations and LearnZillion to present new lessons and concepts. Students really enjoy it. They then take a short quiz afterwards to give me an idea of who understood and who needs more support. That leaves me doing a lot less talking. It also sets the scene for peer tutoring, and my time is freed up for remediation and small group support. I even have student who are excelling at a standard create their own video lessons for their peers.
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Solution 4
Posted March 2, 2015 4:14 am

vaguPe
vaguPe
Reps: 99
Implement technology in your daily curriculum. There's a reason the internet was invented as it plays a role of presenting information in the most aesthetically manner. There has to be a read aloud or short play that relates to what you're reading to your students. You can then apply fun activities online if applicable.
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Solution 5
Posted October 9, 2016 1:30 am

uVupuz
uVupuz
Reps: 100
I am having the same problem.
One thing that I have done in my lessons was have a YouTube video ready for the content. I will stop the video and ask questions. I will generate mini-discussions though out the video. I will teach the content and relate it back to the video.
Also, relating the video to real world situations will engage them.
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