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Posted on March 10, 2015 9:00 pm
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VadeQa
VadeQa
Reps: 105
When teachers don't do their job
What do you do when parents fill your ears with horrible things about co-workers- stories about how they don't grade assignments, or how they sit behind their desk and rarely interact with the kids. You believe that some of it is true based off of the kids (and their skills) that you inherit each year from his/her room. Do you tell your Asst. Principal about it? Do you gloss over it with the parents?
 
     
     
 
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Solution 1
Posted March 12, 2015 4:02 pm

maTaTy
maTaTy
Reps: 103
I think this comes down to your own judgement. You don't know the history behind the parents coming for that person they are talking about. It is just gossip for the most part. You could always go to this co-worker and let them know what is being said. You can make them aware of the situation and if there is a problem they can try and correct it themselves.
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nydyra
nydyra
Reps: 202
I agree you should go to the individual. People talking gossip probably have something bad to say about everyone, including you, and not just the one person you heard about.
  Posted on: October 17, 2015 9:33 am

uzyXuV
uzyXuV
Reps: 208
I agree I would talk to my co-worker in private about what the parent had to say. My co-worker may have valuable insight on that parent's child learning skills.
  Posted on: October 18, 2015 1:57 am

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Solution 2
Posted March 15, 2015 5:25 pm

XyGady
XyGady
Reps: 106
I think it is important to develop your own opinion of others and realize that your opinions should not effective the classroom or school setting. If you feel that a teacher is not being as effective as they should, maybe you could provide advice to the teacher as to what students like. Nevertheless, if a teacher is being ineffective and effortlessly when it comes to their students, then it will surely show. Then, it will be the principal's job to get involved.
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Solution 3
Posted March 11, 2015 1:46 pm

yqureZ
yqureZ
Reps: 103
I can see both sides of the argument. I think that you have to take the situation and deal with it differently in public and inside of the school. Outside of school you do not "bad mouth" a teacher with anyone: parent or colleague. Doing this allows for the school to look unified and to help cut down on rumors that can start about teachers. Inside of school, I think that you talk to the teacher personally about the situation. Also, you have to think about the severity and authenticity of the complaint.
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ezeDeZ
ezeDeZ
Reps: 107
I would take the parent's concerns with a grain of salt. I'm sure that there is some legitimacy behind the concerns, but we know that oftentimes parents see and hear what they want to. I would evaluate the students on my own, see where they are at compared to their peers from other classrooms. If it turns out that the children are lacking significant skills, I would go speak to the teacher about how they presented the information, what lessons were used to practice that skill, and maybe bring up using more rigor. If it continues, maybe speak to administration.
  Posted on: March 11, 2015 5:36 pm

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Solution 4
Posted March 11, 2015 11:58 pm

aNuLyB
aNuLyB
Reps: 102
If the students are being academically affected, then I would immediately bring up the concerns with Administration. I would just thank the parents for letting you know. You do not ever want to gossip with a parent about another co-worker.
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Solution 5
Posted October 13, 2015 12:38 pm

Sarah Drake
Sarah Drake
Reps: 100
First, do you have an opportunity to observe the classroom firsthand? This may provide insight into the legitimacy of parents' claims. Second, if you do determine there may be issues, then use data of previous students to discuss general concerns with your administrators. Perhaps suggest a vertical meeting so neighboring grade levels can discuss desired skills of incoming students.
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uzyXuV
uzyXuV
Reps: 208
I wouldn't put that much effort into parent's gossip. Simply state what and how you do things in your classroom. I can't imagine observing by co-worker class uninvited to tell the admin. her teaching methods are incorrect.
  Posted on: October 18, 2015 1:55 am

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Solution 6
Posted October 14, 2015 4:13 pm

aHeRaJ
aHeRaJ
Reps: 128
Parents usually talk about other teachers to see what you will say. Keep your mouth closed about your colleague unless it is positive (no matter how you personally feel). You could always say something general like, "we have some very hard working teachers here" or "I'm sorry you have had that experience". Depending on how well you know the teacher they were talking about, you might want to inform him or her about how parents are seeing them so that they can make sure they are doing the right thing. Unless it is an unethical or immoral behavior, the principal does not need to know right off hand. Go to the person first. But never talk about a colleague negatively to a parent. It not only makes the colleague look bad but it makes you look bad as well.
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Solution 7
Posted July 2, 2015 7:10 pm

uZynaG
uZynaG
Reps: 103
I think that this is up to your own discretion as far as deciding how to deal with it.
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nydyra
nydyra
Reps: 202
I think as a fellow teacher, it would be unethical not to do anything...which is what some teachers might end up doing.
  Posted on: October 17, 2015 9:35 am

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