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Posted on March 10, 2015 11:46 pm
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VadeQa
VadeQa
Reps: 105
Autistic student resists collaboration
An incredibly bright autistic student is sitting in your classroom with few accommodations other than being provided an individual testing room on tests . She is more than capable for the coursework; actually, she is quite brilliant. The problem is that you use partner turn and shares and small group collaborative work in your classroom on a regular basis. Your autistic student really hates this and, depending on her mood, refuses to work with others. How do you handle this situation?
 
     
     
 
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Solution 1
Posted March 11, 2015 3:34 pm

usyvaS
usyvaS
Reps: 100
Being that you must differentiate in your classroom to meet the needs of each student, I think you should honor her space and allow her to work independently especially if she is meeting the standards while working alone. We have to remember as educators that our students are people too, and some of them just don't like interaction with others. As an alternative, you could partner with her sometimes to assess informally her thoughts on the concept being delivered. That's just an option.
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udapum
udapum
Reps: 102
I would also suggest partnering with the student yourself. Many autistic children are more comfortable talking with adults than peers. After sharing with you for awhile, she may become more comfortable with the idea and be more willing to share with her peers eventually.
  Posted on: March 16, 2015 12:30 am

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Solution 2
Posted March 14, 2015 3:41 am

genusa
genusa
Reps: 102
I teach two students who are extremely intelligent and are diagnosed with Aspergers this year. It's been quite a challenge for myself because the two are extremely bright and don't feel they need to follow my instructions in multiple situations. One of them being group work. I allow them the opportunity to work individually but require that they demonstrate their understanding and ability to communicate with others by creating something like a Prezi or a Powerpoint that will give me all the information I need to know about the content. They are often much more willing to communicate with me than with classmates. While they will have to learn to communicate and work with their peers, I'm not sure if your school has any Autism Program Specialists but ours are phenomenal and I let them work with them on their group work skills.
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Solution 3
Posted September 30, 2015 8:14 pm

Kayla Campbell
Kayla Campbell
Reps: 105
I would respect her feelings and give her the option to work independently when she chooses to do so. As long as she is able to meet the objectives on her own I don't see a problem with accommodating the student in this way. Try to figure out why she hates it so much and if there is anything you can do to facilitate a more positive collaborative environment, maybe there is a certain student she would prefer to work with?
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Solution 4
Posted October 2, 2015 7:56 pm

PezaLe
PezaLe
Reps: 203
I would not force a students with ASD to work with others, if they are not yet comfortable doing so. I would have others students befriend this students and in time the student will open up. I feel the students may just be uneasy because she is not used to this type of collaboration just yet.
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Solution 5
Posted October 9, 2016 1:16 am

uVupuz
uVupuz
Reps: 100
I would gradually try this with the student. Maybe assign her to the same buddy for a few months? This will let her build relationships with students. I would change her buddy every few months and see how it goes. Maybe an alternative assignment could work? As long as she demonstrates understanding? I am on the fence.
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Solution 6
Posted October 13, 2016 8:30 pm

Jillian Rintrona
Jillian Rintrona
Reps: 103
you could do it as an option. give them an option to work alone or in groups.
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Solution 7
Posted February 21, 2017 11:17 pm

tygaBu
tygaBu
Reps: 201
I understand the wish for collaborative learning in the classroom. Many times it can aid student learning, however at the same time many students resist the environment for a number of different reasons. In this specific instance the diagnosis of autism often has a social limitation. My suggestion would be to have a part of the classroom that allows students to work independently on assignments while others work collaboratively. By not singling the student out you will create a more accepting environment.For pair and share pair the autistic student with a partner who she works well with.
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Solution 8
Posted February 21, 2017 11:18 pm

tygaBu
tygaBu
Reps: 201
I understand the wish for collaborative learning in the classroom. Many times it can aid student learning, however at the same time many students resist the environment for a number of different reasons. In this specific instance the diagnosis of autism often has a social limitation. My suggestion would be to have a part of the classroom that allows students to work independently on assignments while others work collaboratively. By not singling the student out you will create a more accepting environment.For pair and share pair the autistic student with a partner who she works well with.
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