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Posted on March 11, 2015 12:57 am
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uLubet
uLubet
Reps: 104
My Child is an "A".
I had the pleasure of meeting a parent who thought her child never should receive any grade below an A. She asked for the student's work. I reviewed the work with her and the student. She started putting out the fact that she felt the subject was not being taught correctly. I had a meeting with the mother, father, assistant principal, principal, and curriculum coordinator. It seemed as if I was a villain all because the student was to be an "A." Of course it came out that the student was not very bright but because her mother was a teacher and the father was a board member, she was to always be an "A" student. It was clear that the student was under much pressure. This student of course passed my class with an 85 average. She did well and understood majority of what the student was to learn. The student received good grades (per past teachers) because they feared the inevitable.
Of course, I was new to the school system. I did not know who knew who and who was related to who. I felt all students were to be taught and assessed fairly. Of course, after this many others were waiting in line for their “A” child. I feel parents should be confident in their children but never labeled them as always making an A. I find that when students understand what they got wrong, they are successful at getting it right the next time. Every child that participates in their own learning would like to succeed. I feel that the system is set up to categorize students achievements with letter grades verse what they have actually learned through progression. Therefore, parents like the one above feel that a child being an “An” in high school is superlative. However, how was the child assessed? Or was she? What foundation has the student built for college? This same student went to college but ended up dropping out because she could not compete with the students in college. She ended up being chemically dependent in order to deal with her inferiorities of not being an “A”.
How do you get parents to validate the student by their progression, good habits, and inquisitiveness? Will the school systems have to change their grading system in order to change the parents’ frame of mind?
 
     
     
 
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Solution 1
Posted March 11, 2015 1:30 am

VadeQa
VadeQa
Reps: 105
This might seem unrelated, but bear with me. I actually collect student papers (with names removed) to use as anchor papers in my classroom. It validates students' grades when I can show them that, though not perfect, this was an A paper and this was a B, etc. Sometimes I project them on the whiteboard and we look at them and discuss what was done really well or what was done poorly - it helps them understand the rubric better. It also helps them with their own self-evaluation process. I have used these same papers when discussing disputed grades with parents. I copy one or two papers every time I grade an assignment. I always make sure to approach that touchy subject as a "this is where we're trying to move _____'s performance", etc. I try not to allow it to be an argument, but more of an explanation with proof. It lets them see their child's work against the work of others. This has worked wonders for me.
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eRuPeT
eRuPeT
Reps: 103
This is a wonderful idea!
  Posted on: March 11, 2015 8:27 pm

ymuXyg
ymuXyg
Reps: 100
This is an awesome idea!
  Posted on: October 18, 2015 6:04 pm

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Solution 2
Posted March 15, 2015 4:20 pm

XyGady
XyGady
Reps: 106
It is important to ensure the parent that learning is a process that has no set outcomes when it comes to the mind. Learning at the various stages of education require various levels of effort and knowledge that could be difficult for some to achieve as quickly as others. With these various levels, outcomes varies depending on the student, their efforts, and acquisition of knowledge at the time. I think in order to ensure the parent that the student is acquiring knowledge at an academically healthy pace, the teacher should inform the parent about the student's academic process and how they can be involved in aiding the process to help further advance their knowledge and educational journey.
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Solution 3
Posted March 11, 2015 9:12 am

yTuGub
yTuGub
Reps: 107
A good all-round teaching practice is to manage student's data effectively. This includes reviewing student's performance with them after each assessments. This is especially important when dealing with difficult parents. For lower schools, student led parent conference is a good place to start. Students are generally honest with themselves and will sometimes keep the parents straight when the parents blame the teachers. I have seen it work multiple times before.
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Solution 4
Posted March 4, 2016 12:45 am

nick morse
nick morse
Reps: 200
i coach travel softball and i have dealt with parents who believe there kid is the best at anything and everything they do. which at a young age is a huge coinfidence boost for them. but it will hurt them later in life when they realize they will come across people who are better then them
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Solution 5
Posted March 11, 2015 1:13 am

SyRaNy
SyRaNy
Reps: 103
I feel school systems do need to let parents understand with the rigor that is now placed in the content standards, students will no longer be expected to make 100 in every class or on every assignment. I get parents to validate their student by keeping a log is signed by the parent. The log contains all grades that the student has made. The students and parents are able to both see and be responsible for the grades that are made. Another way for parents to validate their student is to have them sign and write how much time was spent during the week at home studying the material. By doing this, the parent and the student is responsible for practicing and understanding the content and preparing for tests.
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