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Posted on March 11, 2015 6:58 pm
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Jennifer Dowdy
Jennifer Dowdy
Reps: 101
Benchmarks
In my school, we have to give benchmarks every 4.5 weeks. We are expected to show student growth with our data from these tests, however, these tests are not allowed be counted as grades. Students know this, and many do not try at all on these tests, which results in no growth. We have brought this issue up with administration, but have no definite answer for how we can motivate students to try their best on these tests. We've tried talking to students about their scores and any growth they have made, and some students do care, but most do not. So, we still have many students who will bubble answers and turn in their test in five minutes. Any suggestions for motivating students to try their best on a test that won't affect their grade?
 
     
     
 
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Solution 1
Posted March 11, 2015 7:08 pm

RuReja
RuReja
Reps: 104
You could offer to replace their lowest grade with their benchmark grade. This would give validation to the test for some students.
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Solution 2
Posted March 13, 2015 1:22 am

dyTuDu
dyTuDu
Reps: 103
One suggestion could be to allow student input on what they would like to receive for their best effort on the benchmark. For example, students might want technology time, extra recess, lunch outside, etc. Knowing what motivates them to do their best would probably be a great place to start.
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unuhaj
unuhaj
Reps: 102
I agree giving students the option to say what they would like would motivate them.
  Posted on: March 13, 2015 11:52 am

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Solution 3
Posted October 12, 2016 5:04 pm

jaDehy
jaDehy
Reps: 200
One possible solution would be to use the test scores as attendance/participation grades. If they score an 80% or higher on the tests, then they get a 100% for participation that day.
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Solution 4
Posted March 11, 2015 7:50 pm

SyRaNy
SyRaNy
Reps: 103
Our school keeps a clipboard of student behavior/work ethic and at the end of each benchmark we host a grade level kickball game. If the students have a certain number of tallies then they do not get to participate. This really worked for us last year in preparation for the CRCT! Maybe it will work for you too!
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Solution 5
Posted March 12, 2015 12:23 am

MateJa
MateJa
Reps: 100
I am not sure if these tests are involved in making high-stakes decisions, such as retention. If so, the test scores should have the same level of motivation as grades. I would imagine that this data would be used in conjunction with grades to make determinations about student placement. I recently had a student take a benchmark math test and not work out any problems. This student had the "opportunity" to work out the problems during free time. If I had to guess, this student will work out the problems on the next test.
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QeRary
QeRary
Reps: 101
I motivate my students by giving the students that meet a homework pass and students that exceed a pass and a treat. It sounds like bribery but it works. I also make student break down their questions by circling verb and underlining nouns. This slows them down.
  Posted on: March 13, 2015 5:30 pm

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Solution 6
Posted October 18, 2015 1:14 am

vaWety
vaWety
Reps: 82
At the school I use to teach at, they created incentives for students to do well on the benchmark. For example, there was a math wheel. If a student scored an 80 or higher on the math benchmark, they were allowed to spin the wheel. Each section of the wheel had a different prize for students to win. This really motivated students to do their best.
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