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Posted on March 11, 2015 7:41 pm
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eRuPeT
eRuPeT
Reps: 103
When co-teacher leaves the room.
I work with a co-teacher for two inclusion classes. From time to time my co-teacher leaves for small group instruction, the students I am left with completely change and do not behave the same way that they did when my co-teacher is in the room. Might I add that most of the issues are with my boys, and my co-teacher is a man. Today I snapped and asked them, "What makes it so different when Mr. "so and so" is not in the room?" One of the boys said, "Because he is a man!"

I did not respond to their comment, but it did bother me. How do I get these boys to stop misbehaving when my co-teacher is not in the room with me?
 
     
     
 
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Solution 1
Posted March 12, 2015 1:51 am

edyRav
edyRav
Reps: 108
Sometimes, the students need to see that you are your coworker work as a team. Maybe your co-teacher could take some of the opportunities to refer the students to you when they are asking to do something. This may send the signal that they should be listening to you like they are to him. Also, it may let the students know that the two of you work as a team.
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Solution 2
Posted March 12, 2015 6:19 pm

HyseSa
HyseSa
Reps: 100
I would let the students know that you and the co-teacher are in constant communication. I have a co-teacher in my classroom and while the my students who work with her normally don't act any differently with either of us, if one is having an exceptionally hard time I will let them know that I would hate to tell the co-teacher what is happening. My co-teacher goes to different classrooms in the county, so I tell them that I'll just go ahead and call her on her cell phone. Normally, that snaps them out of it quickly. If they are aware of how easily you can get in touch with the co-teacher, things may change!
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Solution 3
Posted March 12, 2015 1:05 am

Haley
Haley
Reps: 104
I think the best thing to do would be to talk with your co-teacher. Tell him that this is happening and you would really appreciate his support in getting students to understand that respect should be given to all teachers, no matter the gender. If your co-teacher talks to students and encourages them to be respectful to all they may respond better. Sometimes we all need support from another adult that may have more of an influence of certain kids. Don't be embarrassed or frustrated, you might be the one helping someone else out one day.
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Solution 4
Posted March 15, 2015 3:02 am

zygudy
zygudy
Reps: 130
Make sure that you and your co-teacher are on the same page with discipline and that your consequences are the same. If you co-teacher does most of the discipline or he is stricter, you students may have identified this and feel that they can get away with more when he is out of the room. Make sure that you are actively disciplining students as much as you co-teacher. Also, have a talk with your co-teacher to discuss the situation. He may also have some insight into the issue.
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Solution 5
Posted October 5, 2015 2:24 am

Qebysu
Qebysu
Reps: 203
You need to explain that you have just as much authority as your co-teacher and that if they do not listen to you, you will be forced to take action against them. If you feel comfortable with this I would also speak to my co-teacher and have him explain to them in private that you are just as qualified and a authority figure as he is.
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Solution 6
Posted October 5, 2018 5:36 pm

yGapeW
yGapeW
Reps: 202
Talk to the co teacher! Maybe he can give you some advice or he can talk to the class as a whole (with you in the room). The students need to know that you are both equal and should be treated that way.
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