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Posted on March 11, 2015 8:12 pm
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SyRaNy
SyRaNy
Reps: 103
Low readers
I am wanting to start an after school program to help struggling readers. How do you suggest to approach the instructional aspect of this program? Meaning, what skills are essential for struggling readers?
 
     
     
 
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Solution 1
Posted March 11, 2015 10:36 pm

aNuLyB
aNuLyB
Reps: 102
I work with struggling readers daily. Depending on how many teachers and kids, I recommend grouping students according to their level (low, lower, lowest)in small groups (4-5). The smaller groups allows more one-on-one direction and less distraction for the students. Students who are low readers are usually very bored in bigger groups and they often are overlooked by the students that always answer all the questions.

When in groups, I always start off having students picture read a book. Then I have them close their books and ask them questions that they have to infer. If you allow students to feel like they are giving correct answers and their explanations are valued, they will feel more confident when learning to read.

Next, I introduce any new vocabulary found in the book. I have students sound out the words with me and then I continue to refer back to the word. Then, we read the book together with me reading and students echoing (repeating). After reading, I ask comprehension questions about the story or ask what they learned and what they think about the book. Again, when a student is praised for their answers they will be motivated to continue to participate.

Because these students are struggling readers, I only like to read through the book one time on the first day. I always play a game at the end of the group that pertains to the book. For example, if the story is about animals on a farm, then I would have students match the vocabulary words, such as pig, cow, goat, with the appropriate picture.

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Haley
Haley
Reps: 104
I use a differentiated phonics program. Assess the skills that students do have and then go from there. Look into the book Differentiated Phonics by Dr. Sharon Walpole, this program basically directly teaches phonics patterns to students and uses practice words and reading passages to build fluency. The program is designed to meet students needs based on a pre-assessment. Students can start as low as CVC then move in to working on blends, r-controlled patterns, CVCe, vowel teams, multisyllabic words, and fluency. It is not an end all be all program but it has been helpful to my students who struggling with reading. Also, find books that students are interested in, do book studies, literature circles, etc. in order to get students excited about reading.
  Posted on: March 12, 2015 1:12 am

eTypaX
eTypaX
Reps: 103
I agree with using Differentiated Phonics by Dr. Sharon Walpole. I too use this approach and it is working in my classroom. Give your students the Informal Decoding Inventory (IDI) and this will pinpoint where your students are lacking the skills they need. Then you can use Dr. Walpole's book for lessons to start either in CVC, blends & digraphs, r controlled, vce, or vowel teams. It is a systematic approach and is very repetitive for students who need to hear things several times. There are assessments after each section to give to the students to keep data on whether or not they have learned the pattern.
  Posted on: March 12, 2015 1:26 am

unuhaj
unuhaj
Reps: 102
Differentiation is key. Grouping students by level is definitely effective.
  Posted on: March 12, 2015 1:44 pm

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Solution 2
Posted March 12, 2015 2:28 pm

maTaTy
maTaTy
Reps: 103
Differentiated instruction will allow you to teach to each student. You can use different assessment methods for the student. Also students love computer activites. There are numerous educational website for reading and it can be fun for the students while learning.
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Solution 3
Posted March 14, 2015 9:36 pm

Xunezu
Xunezu
Reps: 107
One way you could approach the after school program is to include 4 teachers. Each teacher would focus on one important area of reading so that students are exposed to them all. One teacher would teach a session of phonics, one fluency, one vocabulary, and one comprehension. Depending on the amount of time you have, students could go to two sessions each day and follow with the other two the next day.
Students would be grouped for each session based on the assessment data that you have, with each group being a similar level. This may mean that you have some first, second, and third graders together, but they would be receiving instruction appropriate for them.
One school in my system as approached summer school in this way, and they've experienced great results!
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Solution 4
Posted March 12, 2015 6:05 pm

PejuQe
PejuQe
Reps: 100
I would begin with giving inventories to assess where the students are. I would separate them in to groups according to their abilities. This would ensure that you are meeting each student's needs. I am not sure of the grade level, but I teach 2nd grade and notice that phonics seems to be a major downfall. I typically start from there and build upon that.
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Solution 5
Posted March 12, 2015 4:05 pm

myqydy
myqydy
Reps: 102
It is impossible to post a solution for your specific students. We simply need more data! You need to know their sight word fluency, phonics ability, reading fluency and comprehension. Try a Fry Word assessment, Informal Phonics Inventory, Fluency Passage and cold reads to determine where your students' weaknesses lie.
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Solution 6
Posted March 13, 2015 12:44 pm

yqureZ
yqureZ
Reps: 103
The biggest area that I see with students that struggle with reading is phonics. Students cannot sound out words if they don't know them. I would say that a program that does focus solely on phonics but gives them a good base in the area. Then you can slowly implement reading books, articles, or magazines that the students are drawn too. Really the only way to improve reading is to read more and progressively harder material too.
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Solution 7
Posted March 16, 2015 1:09 am

J SJ
J SJ
Reps: 101
Students need to have decoding skills and need to learn sight words, so they can read a page without having to decode every word. They also need to work on comprehension skills. I might start with a sight word list and see how each student is doing on that skill. Then I would develop games and small group activities that will work on specific skills.
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