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Posted on March 12, 2015 1:47 am
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uPaVuT
uPaVuT
Reps: 102
Professionalism while disagreeing with colleagues
I have been working with a group of other teachers creating projects for my county since my state recently eliminated our standards of learning test and is requiring alternative assessments. We have worked for two months to create one project. We have all been really excited about what we have created. I went to a training on rubrics today and realized that our project does not align to our standards or the cognitive level that the standards expect. I feel that it is important to share what I have learned with my colleagues so that we do not attempt to submit project results to the Department of Education at the end of the year and have poor results. However, I also fear that my colleagues will not be open to hear what I will have to say because we have worked so long and hard on what we have. But I also do not want to give a project to my students that is not aligned. Plus, the county requires that we all implement the same project in the county. How should I proceed?
 
     
     
 
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Solution 1
Posted March 12, 2015 5:45 pm

buZage
buZage
Reps: 100
I would definitely bring the fact that the projects/rubrics do not align with the standards or cognitive levels because that is the entire point of the projects. Personally, I would develop about 3-5 ways that you could improve the projects that you have already created in order to help them become aligned. By providing the problem and possible solutions all at once, your colleagues are less likely to feel as though you are attacking the work that has been created and more likely to see that you are just trying to make the necessary improvements that are required.
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PaGuDu
PaGuDu
Reps: 101
I feel that by providing possible improvements, you will be working to deflate the possibility of an escalated situation. When you put a lot of time and effort into a project it is hard not to get defensive when you feel that you are being criticized. As a participant in the design process, you can communicate that you understand your colleagues frustration, but show that changes to meet the standards will not be difficult. Great solution!
  Posted on: March 13, 2015 11:52 am

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Solution 2
Posted March 15, 2015 1:56 am

tubyzy
tubyzy
Reps: 106
I would use my building level administrator of school lead teacher to help with this situation. First I would talk with one of them to see if they agree with your concerns about what you all have created. If they do, it would be wise to invite them to the next meeting and talk with ways that you all can divide the work to improve the assessments.
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Solution 3
Posted March 16, 2015 1:33 am

aheGeG
aheGeG
Reps: 113
It's all in the way you approach the situation. Your teammates need to have the new information. Go back to your team and tell them your appreciate all the work that they have put in but, there is a new challenge to face.
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