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  Case: Student Won’t Stop Crying
This is the first time I am teaching 2nd grade. I have taught 4th and 5th grades for the last 20 years. I have had to go through an adaptation process, but everything is working okay now. Students and I have learned to work with each other very well. Three weeks ago a new student joined my classroom. He and his family moved to the US from Japan. Since he arrived, he has been crying. He does not speak any English, and there is no one at my school who speaks Japanese. Both of his parents have full time jobs, so they cannot come to school every time I call them. What I found out from the parents is that he cries because he misses his friends in Japan. I think the issue is bigger than that. I have not found a way to help him yet. Why do you think he cries every day? What can I do to stop the crying because the other students in my class get distracted when starts crying?
Solution: (Rates are posted for this solution!)
I believe that this student should be accommodated! He needs help and needs it now. I don't know what your school system has or does when a new student transfers in, but he should have been identified as soon as he stepped in the doors. A student from Japan that does not speak any English should have some type of support to assist him with his English proficiency. I feel that his needs are not being met and that he feels that he does not belong here at this school. I would assume that he feels like no one can help him nor can anyone understand what he is going through. The teacher is the first line of defense in this case. The teacher needs to make every effort possible to make him feel like he is apart of the classroom. First and foremost, the teacher needs to take the time to sit down with the parents and the school system to devise a plan on how they are going to best serve and successfully integrate this student into the mainstream population. They need to find ways that they can incorporate his native language into daily classroom activities so that he does not feel so isolated and insignificant. Another strategy for helping him adjust is having him create one of the film strips similar to Igoa's concept about how he feels about leaving Japan and coming to this country as an immigrant. The teacher needs to select some students from the class and have them help him make this student feel like he is important and apart of this class. He needs to tell these students how they can make him feel more at home and less anxious by doing some research of his own. He needs to find out the student's native language, religion, beliefs, interests, and any other pertinent information that may make it easier for him to help this student transition into the American classroom. Granted, this is not a small feat, but the teacher could type his assignments into the computer and then change the text over to Japanese so that anything that this student needs to read can initially be in his native language (It is hard, we are doing it right now for a Korean student). He can also find audio exerts of poems and literature in his native language so that he feels welcome. He could also find out what school his friends attend back in Japan and he could establish some line of communication with them (i.e. letters, email, Skype, etc.) during the school day. The teacher can also allow this student to share his cultural heritage and who he is with the class. This will take some planning as he is unable to speak English. He may have to type it into a word document in his native language and the teacher may have to convert it to English and read it to the class. I believe that this will help in educating the students on how school and life was for this student in Japan. Then they will have a better understanding of just how different things really are here in America. I must say that this is a lot of work, but it is well worth it. We have a student that just came from Korea and we have had to do these things for her and she has made a wonderful transition into our school. She obviously misses her friends and has her moments, but she has friends here at school and had the ability to progress through the curriculum with proper support and accommodations.
 
     
     
  Rating
The suggested solution is respectful of the individual (student) Yes
The suggested solution is relevant to the case Yes
The suggested solution is reasonable (easy) for the teacher to implement Yes
The suggested solution is likely to solve the problem/issue Yes
The suggested solution is original Yes
Comments: Great Idea! If I were in this situation, I would exactly do this.
Rated On: October 17, 2014 8:43 pm
Rated By: Doniesha
 
     
     
  Rating
The suggested solution is respectful of the individual (student) Yes
The suggested solution is relevant to the case Yes
The suggested solution is reasonable (easy) for the teacher to implement Yes
The suggested solution is likely to solve the problem/issue Yes
The suggested solution is original Yes
Comments: I think you present some great ideas
Rated On: October 18, 2015 4:46 am
Rated By: Krystalynn Gulczewski